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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Sheriff's deputies knocked on Roger and Sandra Jenkins' front door in Taneytown early one Saturday in January to serve a court paper to the couple's teenage son. Within minutes, a chaotic scene unfolded, and the family's chocolate Labrador retriever was shot by one of the deputies and collapsed bleeding in the snow. The dog survived, but its owners say it is permanently disabled. The couple sued, alleging reckless endangerment and infliction of emotional distress. Their lawsuit, filed against the Frederick County Sheriff's Department in October, is part of a growing body of case law dealing with animal issues.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
In what lawyers believe was a first in Maryland, a judge recently ordered a divorcing Calvert County couple to split custody of their dog, a recognition, experts say, that pets stand apart from other property. Once rare, post-breakup disputes over who keeps the pet have grown more common in the past two decades. At the same time, some couples, many choosing not to have children, are lavishing attention on their pets and are willing to spend thousands of dollars in legal fees fighting for custody of Rover.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | August 24, 2012
The Thienel Law Firm of Columbia has four associates. Managing member Stephen C. Thienel, however, has two more of his own -- chocolate Labs Mocha and Star, who spend the day greeting clients or curled up in his office, where they could be poster pups representing the portion of the firm's practice involving animal law. “Animal law incorporates a range of different areas of the law, such as criminal, zoning, contracts, property rights, animal welfare...
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | August 24, 2012
The Thienel Law Firm of Columbia has four associates. Managing member Stephen C. Thienel, however, has two more of his own -- chocolate Labs Mocha and Star, who spend the day greeting clients or curled up in his office, where they could be poster pups representing the portion of the firm's practice involving animal law. “Animal law incorporates a range of different areas of the law, such as criminal, zoning, contracts, property rights, animal welfare...
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
The Harford County Council voted 5-2 last week to repeal a law that required the county to reimburse farmers for livestock killed by dogs, ending one of the more hotly debated issues before the council this summer.Councilman Robert S. Wagner, who introduced the bill, argued successfully that the law was outdated and ineffective and simply made the county an insurance company for farmers. The law once was required by state law, but no longer is."I think repealing it shows a commitment to downsizing government, even if it is in this very, very small way," said Council President Joanne S. Parrott.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
Damon Richardson sees his three pit bulls, Mustufa, Shaolyn and Chump, as pampered pets and protectors.Neighbor Judith Berger has a different view. She says the dogs are dangerous, aggressive animals that have terrorized the suburban community of Lochearn.The long-simmering backyard dispute has split the northwest Baltimore County neighborhood -- and is the kind of frustrating standoff the county wants to prevent with a tough new animal control law.Faced with increasing complaints about pit bulls and Rottweilers, the county wants to allow quicker removal of threatening animals and give authorities tighter control over them.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
The Court of Special Appeals struck down yesterday a Baltimore County animal control ordinance, saying it goes too far in penalizing residents for damages caused by their animals.Maryland's intermediate appellate court ruled that the Baltimore County provisions expose animal owners there to civil suits that their counterparts in other jurisdictions would not face.The 20-year-old law allows anyone injured by any type of animal to collect damages from the owner, regardless of whether he is negligent.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
An owner of the Siberian husky whose shooting death last year became a rallying cry for animal welfare advocates, urged state lawmakers Thursday to stiffen the penalties for violating the state's animal cruelty law. Ryan Rettaliata, who owned Bear-Bear along with his wife, said the newly married couple felt as if they had lost a child when Bear-Bear died after being shot in an Anne Arundel County dog park. Rettaliata said he hoped the change in law would spare other pets the same fate.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
An owner of the Siberian husky whose shooting death last year became a rallying cry for animal welfare advocates, urged state lawmakers Thursday to stiffen the penalties for violating the state's animal cruelty law. Ryan Rettaliata, who owned Bear-Bear along with his wife, said the newly married couple felt as if they had lost a child when Bear-Bear died after being shot in an Anne Arundel County dog park. Rettaliata said he hoped the change in law would spare other pets the same fate.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Sheriff's deputies knocked on Roger and Sandra Jenkins' front door in Taneytown early one Saturday in January to serve a court paper to the couple's teenage son. Within minutes, a chaotic scene unfolded, and the family's chocolate Labrador retriever was shot by one of the deputies and collapsed bleeding in the snow. The dog survived, but its owners say it is permanently disabled. The couple sued, alleging reckless endangerment and infliction of emotional distress. Their lawsuit, filed against the Frederick County Sheriff's Department in October, is part of a growing body of case law dealing with animal issues.
LIFESTYLE
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
In what lawyers believe was a first in Maryland, a judge recently ordered a divorcing couple to split custody of their dog, a recognition, experts say, that pets stand apart from other property. Once rare, post-breakup disputes over who keeps the pet have grown more common in the past two decades. At the same time, some couples, many choosing not to have children, are lavishing attention on their pets and are willing to spend thousands of dollars in legal fees fighting for custody of Rover.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANNIE LINSKEY AND ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTERS | February 10, 2006
Animal rights activists and law enforcement officials urged a Maryland House panel yesterday to pass legislation that would close a loophole in the law that allowed an Edgewater jogger who forcefully kicked a nipping poodle to go uncharged. The bill, drafted by Del. Murray D. Levy, a Charles County Democrat, would alter a state law so that anyone who inflicts "unnecessary pain or suffering" on an animal could be charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty. Under current law, a misdemeanor charge can be brought only against an animal's owner or caretaker.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
Damon Richardson sees his three pit bulls, Mustufa, Shaolyn and Chump, as pampered pets and protectors.Neighbor Judith Berger has a different view. She says the dogs are dangerous, aggressive animals that have terrorized the suburban community of Lochearn.The long-simmering backyard dispute has split the northwest Baltimore County neighborhood -- and is the kind of frustrating standoff the county wants to prevent with a tough new animal control law.Faced with increasing complaints about pit bulls and Rottweilers, the county wants to allow quicker removal of threatening animals and give authorities tighter control over them.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
The Court of Special Appeals struck down yesterday a Baltimore County animal control ordinance, saying it goes too far in penalizing residents for damages caused by their animals.Maryland's intermediate appellate court ruled that the Baltimore County provisions expose animal owners there to civil suits that their counterparts in other jurisdictions would not face.The 20-year-old law allows anyone injured by any type of animal to collect damages from the owner, regardless of whether he is negligent.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANNIE LINSKEY AND ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTERS | February 10, 2006
Animal rights activists and law enforcement officials urged a Maryland House panel yesterday to pass legislation that would close a loophole in the law that allowed an Edgewater jogger who forcefully kicked a nipping poodle to go uncharged. The bill, drafted by Del. Murray D. Levy, a Charles County Democrat, would alter a state law so that anyone who inflicts "unnecessary pain or suffering" on an animal could be charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty. Under current law, a misdemeanor charge can be brought only against an animal's owner or caretaker.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
The Harford County Council voted 5-2 last week to repeal a law that required the county to reimburse farmers for livestock killed by dogs, ending one of the more hotly debated issues before the council this summer.Councilman Robert S. Wagner, who introduced the bill, argued successfully that the law was outdated and ineffective and simply made the county an insurance company for farmers. The law once was required by state law, but no longer is."I think repealing it shows a commitment to downsizing government, even if it is in this very, very small way," said Council President Joanne S. Parrott.
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