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Animal House

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NEWS
August 16, 1993
The film comedy "Animal House," a depiction of the hilariously destructive ways of a fictional college fraternity, has provided a lot of laughs since its release 15 summers ago.For homeowners in residential neighborhoods, however, it's no laughing matter when a real-life "animal house" opens right next door or just down the street. The generally raucous behavior of student residents -- including loud music and rowdy parties at hours when most other folks are trying to sleep -- has long been a problem in communities where these houses proliferate.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
When Ron Tanner, an author and writing professor at Loyola University Maryland, purchased a condemned Victorian brownstone in Charles Village 14 years ago (against his real estate agent's advice), he knew nothing about restoration. The fact that the three-story rowhouse belonged to - and was trashed by - a college fraternity over a decade did not deter him and his then-girlfriend, Jill Eicher. In fact, they made it their mission to save the home from further destruction and restore it to its 1897 glory.
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FEATURES
By George M. Thomas and R.D. Heldenfels and George M. Thomas and R.D. Heldenfels,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 26, 2003
In 1978, a raucous, raunchy, testosterone-laden, anarchic comedy hit movie theaters -- and changed how movies have been made ever since. The movie is Animal House, a tale of the losers and slackers in the Delta Tau Chi fraternity in the early 1960s. They drank, smoked dope, cheated on exams, lusted after women, swore, lied, swaggered and gave a horse a heart attack. Before its release, it appeared to be a forgettable, cheap comedy. After seeing the script, Universal Studios "hated it," producer Ivan Reitman said.
NEWS
August 31, 2013
The evening before my wife and I took our eldest child to college, we pulled out a DVD of "Animal House" and watched it together in high definition. It's still pretty funny 35 years after it was first released. This isn't real-life college, we warned our daughter, but someday you may look back and see striking similarities between these Faber College miscreants and your own experience. Now that we have returned, having dropped her off with a minivan full of clothing, books, electronics and the other standard dormitory fare, I have to wonder if we're mistaken.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 22, 1997
Sure, it's rude. Sure, it's crude. Sure, it's lewd (although not so much on commercial TV).It's also a riot.Bluto, Flounder, Pinto and the gang are all there in "National Lampoon's Animal House" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., TNT), easily the funniest film about college life ever unleashed on American audiences.Everybody has their favorite moments: the horse in the dean's office, Bluto's impersonation of a pimple, the visit to the women's college, the bar, the supermarket, the parade. Rarely has so much anarchy made it into one film, and never has National Lampoon come close to scaling the heights it reached with this 1978 movie.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1998
"National Lampoon's Animal House," 1978's film tribute to collegiate revelry, was the first major movie for many an unknown actor who later shed his toga and grew up to be a major star.Among them were Tom Hulce and Kevin Bacon. But DeWayne Jessie, who was then one of Universal Studios' stable of character actors, was the only alum of the film to parlay a role in "Animal House" into a living monument to the film."They didn't want a big name, but they wanted someone audiences could identify with," says Jessie, who played singer Otis Day. Before "Animal House," Jessie had received an NAACP Image Award and had been in numerous Universal Studios productions.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
National Lampoon's Van Wilder is a very funny movie ... ... in some alternate universe, maybe. But in this one, it's about as funny as a dog's naughty bits, which, coincidentally, are key to this movie's idea of inspired humor. There's a gross, mean-spirited and excruciatingly long scene involving revenge, cream-filled eclairs and the aforementioned canine parts. If this is your idea of hilarious, read no further; I can be of no help to you at all. Everyone else, be forewarned. Don't be fooled by the National Lampoon name and comic pedigree stretching back to National Lampoon's Animal House, a terrific and truly funny film that managed to be both hilarious and in bad taste.
NEWS
August 31, 2013
The evening before my wife and I took our eldest child to college, we pulled out a DVD of "Animal House" and watched it together in high definition. It's still pretty funny 35 years after it was first released. This isn't real-life college, we warned our daughter, but someday you may look back and see striking similarities between these Faber College miscreants and your own experience. Now that we have returned, having dropped her off with a minivan full of clothing, books, electronics and the other standard dormitory fare, I have to wonder if we're mistaken.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
I found it highly amusing that a majority of those taking your reader poll on climate change are still in denial that the looming environmental disaster is man-made. They remind me of the Kevin Bacon character at the end of the movie "Animal House," who is frantically stamping his feet and screaming "all is well" just as an oncoming stampede of people tramples him to death. I guess if you sit in your air conditioned living room watching Fox News and listening to Rush Limbaugh, you can still pretend climate change isn't happening - as long as you avoid going outside in the real world.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
When Ron Tanner, an author and writing professor at Loyola University Maryland, purchased a condemned Victorian brownstone in Charles Village 14 years ago (against his real estate agent's advice), he knew nothing about restoration. The fact that the three-story rowhouse belonged to - and was trashed by - a college fraternity over a decade did not deter him and his then-girlfriend, Jill Eicher. In fact, they made it their mission to save the home from further destruction and restore it to its 1897 glory.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
I found it highly amusing that a majority of those taking your reader poll on climate change are still in denial that the looming environmental disaster is man-made. They remind me of the Kevin Bacon character at the end of the movie "Animal House," who is frantically stamping his feet and screaming "all is well" just as an oncoming stampede of people tramples him to death. I guess if you sit in your air conditioned living room watching Fox News and listening to Rush Limbaugh, you can still pretend climate change isn't happening - as long as you avoid going outside in the real world.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
What do you do in the face of looming disaster? In the movie Animal House, the character of Otter memorably suggested the situation "absolutely requires a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody's part. " That was meant to be funny, of course, the juvenile cut-ups of a frat house that refuses to take responsibilities seriously. But less amusing are the antics of conservatives who decided to conduct their own futile and stupid gesture this week in the form of the "cut, cap and balance" proposal that would take $100 billion from this year's budget, cap future budgets to a percentage of the country's economic activity and require a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
FEATURES
By George M. Thomas and R.D. Heldenfels and George M. Thomas and R.D. Heldenfels,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 26, 2003
In 1978, a raucous, raunchy, testosterone-laden, anarchic comedy hit movie theaters -- and changed how movies have been made ever since. The movie is Animal House, a tale of the losers and slackers in the Delta Tau Chi fraternity in the early 1960s. They drank, smoked dope, cheated on exams, lusted after women, swore, lied, swaggered and gave a horse a heart attack. Before its release, it appeared to be a forgettable, cheap comedy. After seeing the script, Universal Studios "hated it," producer Ivan Reitman said.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - It was a scene more worthy of a smoky bar than of one of the most powerful committees in the House of Representatives. Insults were hurled, threats were made and the police were summoned. In the end, there was even a trial of sorts. But this was no barroom brawl. It began as a meeting of the House Ways and Means Committee. It culminated with an angry debate in the full House over whether to formally scold the Republican chairman of the panel, the notoriously prickly Rep. Bill Thomas of California, for siccing the cops on his Democratic colleagues.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
National Lampoon's Van Wilder is a very funny movie ... ... in some alternate universe, maybe. But in this one, it's about as funny as a dog's naughty bits, which, coincidentally, are key to this movie's idea of inspired humor. There's a gross, mean-spirited and excruciatingly long scene involving revenge, cream-filled eclairs and the aforementioned canine parts. If this is your idea of hilarious, read no further; I can be of no help to you at all. Everyone else, be forewarned. Don't be fooled by the National Lampoon name and comic pedigree stretching back to National Lampoon's Animal House, a terrific and truly funny film that managed to be both hilarious and in bad taste.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1998
"National Lampoon's Animal House," 1978's film tribute to collegiate revelry, was the first major movie for many an unknown actor who later shed his toga and grew up to be a major star.Among them were Tom Hulce and Kevin Bacon. But DeWayne Jessie, who was then one of Universal Studios' stable of character actors, was the only alum of the film to parlay a role in "Animal House" into a living monument to the film."They didn't want a big name, but they wanted someone audiences could identify with," says Jessie, who played singer Otis Day. Before "Animal House," Jessie had received an NAACP Image Award and had been in numerous Universal Studios productions.
NEWS
August 6, 1993
Towson State University used to have waiting lists for its on-campus dormitories. Then the recession hit. Increasing numbers of students began to move off-campus in search of cheaper places to board. Some went back to the "Mom and Dad Hilton," others into group houses in local residential communities.For the most part, these group boarding houses have posed few problems for their neighbors. Still, youthful spirit being what it is, there are some that have earned reputations as "animal houses," much like the fictional fraternity pad depicted in the 1978 film comedy that starred John Belushi.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
What do you do in the face of looming disaster? In the movie Animal House, the character of Otter memorably suggested the situation "absolutely requires a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody's part. " That was meant to be funny, of course, the juvenile cut-ups of a frat house that refuses to take responsibilities seriously. But less amusing are the antics of conservatives who decided to conduct their own futile and stupid gesture this week in the form of the "cut, cap and balance" proposal that would take $100 billion from this year's budget, cap future budgets to a percentage of the country's economic activity and require a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | March 19, 1998
It was former Gov. William Donald Schaefer who commanded staffers at the Maryland Department of Agriculture to talk to the animals.Well, that's not exactly how Schaefer said it - though it's easy to imagine the colorful and oft-quoted politico making such a demand. After all, this is the man who as mayor of Baltimore got some of his best press frolicking with some frisky seals at the city's National Aquarium.Shortly after he was elected governor, Schaefer urged all state agencies to open their offices to the public at least once a year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 22, 1997
Sure, it's rude. Sure, it's crude. Sure, it's lewd (although not so much on commercial TV).It's also a riot.Bluto, Flounder, Pinto and the gang are all there in "National Lampoon's Animal House" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., TNT), easily the funniest film about college life ever unleashed on American audiences.Everybody has their favorite moments: the horse in the dean's office, Bluto's impersonation of a pimple, the visit to the women's college, the bar, the supermarket, the parade. Rarely has so much anarchy made it into one film, and never has National Lampoon come close to scaling the heights it reached with this 1978 movie.
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