Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnimal Cruelty
IN THE NEWS

Animal Cruelty

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 25, 2011
As the physicians quoted in your article on the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's use of animals for surgical training, we were disappointed that the school's only response was from a spokesperson, and that neither the dean nor the chair of the surgery department provided comment ("Johns Hopkins under fire for using animals in doctor training," Feb. 24). We requested that Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein look into whether Hopkins' use of animals violates Maryland's animal cruelty laws.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Regarding Becky Robinson's commentary on animal cruelty, Anne Arundel County should come out of the Dark Ages and into the compassionate era where all creatures are treated with respect ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept. 4). Trap, neuter and release is the modern way. We in Canada employ this technique and it is working great. James Cosgrave - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Advertisement
FEATURES
August 18, 2011
In the fight against animal cruelty in Baltimore, people have cursed, cried and written letters, protested and formed committees. But on Saturday, cycle enthusiasts will rev their engines in the name of treating animals better. The Peacekeepers Motorcycle Club is joining the Mayor's Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission, for a day dedicated to raising awareness about animal cruelty and domestic violence in Baltimore. They're calling it a "peace ride and rally against animal cruelty.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
A New York woman faces animal cruelty charges after she allegedly left a 15-year-old Yorkshire Terrier in a car in an Annapolis parking lot for two hours Tuesday, police said. Monifa Ayadelle Pendelton, 44, ran into a Petco in the 2300 block of Forest Drive with her dog, Chloe, around 2:30 p.m., asking for help after realizing what she had done, police said. Police and Anne Arundel County Animal Control were called, and an animal hospital veterinarian later diagnosed the dog with extreme heat stroke and recommended it be put down, police said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
The July retrial of 19-year-old twins Travers and Tremayne Johnson, whose first animal-cruelty trial ended in a hung jury, has been postponed. The new city circuit court date — Sept. 16 — could complicate a civil case now scheduled for days later, however. In January 2009, five months before they are accused of setting fire to a pit bull, the Johnson brothers and three others filed a lawsuit against a Baltimore landlord, claiming that exposure to lead paint has left them unable to work.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Two 16-year-olds are facing animal cruelty charges after Anne Arundel County police responded to a call about what appeared to be a dogfight. Shortly before 5:30 p.m. Thursday, a caller told police that there were about five people watching two dogs fighting in the woods near Athena Lane and Loving Road in Severn, according to a police statement. Police said that as they arrived, the group scattered, running toward Arwell Court, which is in the Orchards of Severn community.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
On reading Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener's commentary on Maryland's poultry industry, I kept waiting for them to cite the hideous cruelty to animals that is inherent in confined animal feeding operations ( "Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?" March 7). But it never came. I do not understand how one can write an article about the polluting agribusiness farms and leave out that part. Billions of chickens have lived torturous lives of misery on Maryland's Eastern Shore "farms," and at least mentioning that in the article would have garnered the writers a lot more support.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
I see yet another front page article in The Sun about combating animal cruelty ("Baltimore athletes show their 'soft side,'" Sept. 26) and my heart sinks. Why is another article about animal cruelty front page news while most stories about human beings losing their lives are reduced to a small paragraph on page four? When was the last time a large reward was offered for information on the murder of a teen-age kid as opposed to the thousands of dollars offered by people coming out of the woodwork when a dog gets hurt?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 26, 2010
Sometimes, though rarely, a Supreme Court ruling is so startling and jarring that Congress is moved swiftly to counter it. That may, and certainly should, be the response to the court's decision declaring unconstitutional a 1999 federal law against creation and distribution of material depicting acts of animal cruelty. By an unusual and rather remarkable 8-1 vote, with Justice Samuel A. Alito, a member of the conservative bloc, the only dissenter, the court held that the law was so broad that it violated the free speech protection under the First Amendment.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
The Queen Anne's County state's attorney's office has filed criminal charges against the owner of a Centreville horse farm from which 140 animals were seized in April. Marsha H. Parkinson, 66, owner of Canterbury Farms, faces 35 animal cruelty charges of failure to provide adequate care for an animal, after the horses were taken from her Melfield Lane farm, according to electronic court records. Neither Parkinson nor Queen Anne's State's Attorney Lance G. Richardson returned calls seeking comment Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Lori K. Brown | July 1, 2014
A Shar-Pei dog named Nala was set loose in a backyard with an inadvertently open gate in Canton last month. Shortly afterward, a well-meaning woman was bitten superficially by Nala as she tried to catch the dog. The woman then called the police, who sent officers to respond to the call. Veteran Officers Jeffrey Bolger and Thomas Schmidt gained control of the dog with a piece of equipment called a catch pole. A dog restrained with a catch pole can then be transported safely. But that's not what the two officers did, according to police.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
A second Baltimore police officer has been charged in the death of a dog whose throat was allegedly slit by another officer, but the city police union says both officers didn't have the tools they needed to do their job and shouldn't be charged. Thomas Schmidt, a 24-year veteran of the department, has been suspended without pay, department spokeswoman Lt. Sarah Connolly said. He had been on paid administrative leave since last week. Police say Schmidt held down Nala, a 7-year-old Shar-Pei, while Officer Jeffrey Bolger slit the dog's throat June 14. According to online court records, Schmidt was charged Thursday with aggravated animal cruelty, animal cruelty, and malfeasance in office.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Nala, the 7-year-old Shar-Pei killed when a Baltimore police officer slit her throat earlier this month, will be memorialized Tuesday at a city establishment where the dog's owner works. The event, Justice for Nala, is slated for 4 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday at Midtown BBQ and Brew, according to the establishment's staff and a listing posted online. A portion of the restaurant's sales for the entire day will be donated to two foundations: the North American Shar-Pei Rescue, Noah's Arks Rescue, and Defenders of Animal Rights, Inc., according to the event listing.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A Baltimore police officer slit the throat of a dog officers had under control and now faces felony animal cruelty charges, the department said Wednesday. Police Deputy Commissioner Dean Palmere called the killing "outrageous and unacceptable" and said internal affairs is investigating the incident, which took place Saturday morning in Brewers Hill. Baltimore City Councilman Robert W. Curran, council liaison to the Mayor's Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission, said there was no reason to have killed the dog if it was restrained with a dog-control pole, as police say it was. "It's pretty astounding that our public safety officers would ever have done this," Curran said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A second officer has been suspended as the Baltimore Police Department investigates a case in which a dog's throat was slit. Officer Thomas Schmidt, a 24-year veteran assigned to the Emergency Services unit, was placed on paid administrative leave after police say he held down a Shar-Pei while a fellow officer, Jeffrey Bolger, slit the dog's throat. Bolger, a Special Operations Section officer hired by the department in 1992, was released on his own recognizance Thursday morning after being charged the night before with aggravated animal cruelty, animal cruelty and malfeasance in office.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
On reading Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener's commentary on Maryland's poultry industry, I kept waiting for them to cite the hideous cruelty to animals that is inherent in confined animal feeding operations ( "Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?" March 7). But it never came. I do not understand how one can write an article about the polluting agribusiness farms and leave out that part. Billions of chickens have lived torturous lives of misery on Maryland's Eastern Shore "farms," and at least mentioning that in the article would have garnered the writers a lot more support.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown will decide whether a jury can see a police surveillance video that prosecutors say ties twin brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson to a pit bull that was set on fire in 2009. The second trial in the animal cruelty case opened Friday with a series of requests by the brothers' defense attorneys for Brown to throw out key pieces of the prosecution's evidence, including the video and a gas can. Brown held off ruling on the motions until at least Monday, when the trial continues.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A 33-year-old Pasadena man was arrested this weekend in the fatal shooting of a small dog that he and his girlfriend had recently adopted, according to Anne Arundel County Police. Clint Matthew Mowry, of the 700 block of 224th St., was taken into custody and charged with animal cruelty and reckless endangerment after officers responded to the home for a report of shots fired about 9:22 p.m. Saturday, police said. The dog, described as a small 8-year-old Yorkshire Terrier mixed breed, was found in the home dead from an apparent gunshot wound, police said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A city police officer is accused of beating a Jack Russell terrier puppy with a mop, then choking the dog and sending a picture of its dead body to its owner - his girlfriend. Montgomery County Police have charged Alec Eugene Taylor, 27, of Silver Spring, with aggravated animal cruelty and abuse or neglect of an animal. Taylor's girlfriend told police she received a text from Taylor on February 26 telling her that he killed the seven-month-old dog, named Rocko, after it defecated on the carpet.
NEWS
January 5, 2014
Ann Roberts wrote about how upset she was with confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and wondered "how humans can ignore and accept" the animal cruelty practiced on chickens and other feed animals ("Pollution is just the beginning of the problem with CAFOs," Dec. 30). Perhaps she might find a bit of pity for human animals who often rely on reasonably priced chicken for their protein needs. Being kinder to feed animals who will still be slaughtered is more costly and may price food out of people's reach, sending them to macaroni and cheese or junk food to fill their bellies.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.