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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
Here is Ricky Martin's to-do list: "Need to pick up injured cat from fire." "Dog bit two family members." "Stray cats and kittens on porch of vacant property and living in boxes without roof or water." "A German shepherd puppy is being kept in a cage too small for him and can't stand up." "Owner moved out and left animal on the street." "Citizen walked by and saw ribs on a dog." Ricky Martin is an animal control officer with the Baltimore health department, and this list is a fraction of complaints he investigated all over the city Thursday.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Baltimore animal control officers would have more leeway to seize dogs, cats or other pets deemed to be a nuisance under a measure the City Council will consider Monday. The legislation, sponsored by Councilman Robert W. Curran, would allow animal control officers to evaluate complaints, such as dogs barking or running loose, and decide whether to take the animal to the pound without having to observe the violation. The animal's owner could get the pet back after a hearing process in the city Health Department, Curran said.
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NEWS
June 6, 2008
An Anne Arundel County Animal Control officer pulled a 2-foot-long alligator out of a golf course pond, authorities said yesterday. A golfer first spotted the reptile May 30 in a pond at the Arundel Golf Park in Glen Burnie. The sighting prompted a hunting expedition of sorts for an animal control officer, who put down traps for several days but came up with nothing. It wasn't until another animal control officer, Glenn Johnson, went searching Wednesday with a rod and reel that the alligator was captured.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
In June 2007, a woman named Ruby Pulley was attacked by two pit bulls in East Baltimore. The dogs were owned by a teenager who bred them for sale; neighbors thought he might fight them, though no one wanted to go on the record saying so. An animal control officer wisely confiscated his other dogs, including a puppy whose ears had been cropped down to nubs. This is all public record: The Sun covered the incident and the dog-fighting culture that directly led to it. We don't know what happened to the other dogs, but the puppy was taken in by Recycled Love and spent her first year of life with a devoted foster family.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 2, 1993
KEY WEST, Fla. -- Like some tales of love gone astray, the short romance of Rocky and Canella ended in court.Rocky, a Chihuahua, somehow managed to impregnate Canella, a Rottweiler, very much against the wishes of Canella's owner, Kevin Foley of Key Largo.So Mr. Foley sued Rocky's owner, Dayami Diaz. Last week, Monroe County Judge Reagan Ptomey ordered Mr. Diaz to pay Mr. Foley $2,567.50.According to Judge Ptomey's two-page order, this is what happened:Canella was in heat, and Mr. Foley planned to breed her "to an acceptable male so that a litter might be sold."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Two Carroll County animal control officers tracked, shot and killed Tuesday a hybrid wolf-dog that had been wreaking havoc on pets and livestock on both sides of the Carroll-Frederick County line, officials said yesterday.The half-wolf, half-dog, which was 18 months old, weighed 100 pounds and stood 30 inches tall at the shoulder, had escaped from a pen at its owners' home in Frederick County about Oct. 28, officials said.The animal -- which had narrow eyes, long legs and big teeth -- stalked cows at Keyterra Farm near the Carroll-Frederick line for a week.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
A daughter of the Millersville couple whose condemned pit bull was stolen from a county Animal Control cage was arrested yesterday by county police after she was accused of refusing to cooperate with authorities investigating a report of unlicensed pit bulls at her Glen Burnie home. According to a police spokesman, Animal Control received information that two unlicensed dogs were at the home in the 200 block of East Thompson Ave. and sent one of its officers to serve a warning to the woman, 20-year-old Dawn Neal.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 19, 2002
In Baltimore City Group seeking to cut size of City Council gathers more names A group that wants to shrink the size of Baltimore's City Council submitted 7,320 more petition signatures to the mayor's office yesterday, bolstering its bid to get the plan on the November ballot. At last count, Community and Labor United for Baltimore (CLUB) lacked about 4,000 of the 10,000 petition signatures needed to place the issue before voters. But the names submitted yesterday do not automatically put the effort over the top because city election officials must confirm that petition signers are registered city voters.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
In June 2007, a woman named Ruby Pulley was attacked by two pit bulls in East Baltimore. The dogs were owned by a teenager who bred them for sale; neighbors thought he might fight them, though no one wanted to go on the record saying so. An animal control officer wisely confiscated his other dogs, including a puppy whose ears had been cropped down to nubs. This is all public record: The Sun covered the incident and the dog-fighting culture that directly led to it. We don't know what happened to the other dogs, but the puppy was taken in by Recycled Love and spent her first year of life with a devoted foster family.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
The animal activist group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals alleges that the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter allowed a mortally injured cat to sit for up to seven hours before euthanizing it — a charge the shelter denies. In letters to BARCS leaders and to city officials, PETA also describes conditions at the shelter as "overcrowded and unhealthy. " The situation regarding the cat stems from a complaint made by a Hamilton man who witnessed a dog maul a cat Aug. 8. Joe Lombardo called animal control to pick up the cat, which was not his, and an officer told him to call BARCS the next morning to follow up. "When he followed up the next day, he was told that the severely injured cat was left without treatment or euthanasia for more than 7 hours, and was not put out of his or her misery until 8:30 am," wrote Teresa Chagrin, a specialist with PETA's cruelty investigations department, in a letter to the director of BARCS.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
The animal activist group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals alleges that the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter allowed a mortally injured cat to sit for up to seven hours before euthanizing it — a charge the shelter denies. In letters to BARCS leaders and to city officials, PETA also describes conditions at the shelter as "overcrowded and unhealthy. " The situation regarding the cat stems from a complaint made by a Hamilton man who witnessed a dog maul a cat Aug. 8. Joe Lombardo called animal control to pick up the cat, which was not his, and an officer told him to call BARCS the next morning to follow up. "When he followed up the next day, he was told that the severely injured cat was left without treatment or euthanasia for more than 7 hours, and was not put out of his or her misery until 8:30 am," wrote Teresa Chagrin, a specialist with PETA's cruelty investigations department, in a letter to the director of BARCS.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann , peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
A 37-year-old animal control officer was shot and wounded Tuesday night shortly after he investigated a report that dogs were being kept illegally in a South Baltimore house and had seized a dog from another residence in a separate call, according to city officials. Jermaine Barnes, who has been on the job for four years, was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center for a gunshot wound to his hand and released. Mayor Sheila Dixon visited him while he was at the hospital. Police have not made any arrests, but the city's chief police spokesman, Anthony Guglielmi, said detectives "are trying to figure out if it was related to the course of his duty or if it was random gunfire."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
Here is Ricky Martin's to-do list: "Need to pick up injured cat from fire." "Dog bit two family members." "Stray cats and kittens on porch of vacant property and living in boxes without roof or water." "A German shepherd puppy is being kept in a cage too small for him and can't stand up." "Owner moved out and left animal on the street." "Citizen walked by and saw ribs on a dog." Ricky Martin is an animal control officer with the Baltimore health department, and this list is a fraction of complaints he investigated all over the city Thursday.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
An Anne Arundel County Animal Control officer pulled a 2-foot-long alligator out of a golf course pond, authorities said yesterday. A golfer first spotted the reptile May 30 in a pond at the Arundel Golf Park in Glen Burnie. The sighting prompted a hunting expedition of sorts for an animal control officer, who put down traps for several days but came up with nothing. It wasn't until another animal control officer, Glenn Johnson, went searching Wednesday with a rod and reel that the alligator was captured.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | October 3, 2005
Crisis on Cliftwood Avenue. Yvette Eppes and her daughter Keyona were pinned in their bathroom for two hours as their cat scratched and hissed from the other side of the closed door. Eppes called the city's animal control department to remove the cat before it mauled them. Officer Robert Hudnall came to the rescue. With eight years on the job, Hudnall has sped to his share of stray dogs, fighting pit bulls and opossums wandering through backyards. He also chased a fox that roamed through a Northeast Baltimore neighborhood for nearly two years, retrieved 90 cats from a house in Southeast Baltimore and saved ducks stuck in a sewer drain.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2003
Her neighbor, who rushed in with news of an unusual sight, didn't know exactly what kind of a critter was prowling their quiet Carroll County neighborhood. But Carol DeLisle had worked as a youngster at the Baltimore Zoo and the downtown aquarium, and she has read about Australia in hopes of one day traveling there. She knew an emu when she saw one. Early yesterday afternoon, the emu -- about 5 feet tall, with black, white and tan feathers and, DeLisle noted, "long eyelashes" -- was still making itself at home behind a split-level house in Eldersburg.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | October 10, 1990
The county auditor nicked the county's animal control office 30 times in a report filed last month with the council and the executive.The awarding of contracts, especially those for picking up dead animals, was criticized as particularly lax. The auditor also reported minimal training, animal adoption problems, computer software malfunctions and low morale.The administration said it will correct most of the problems cited in the report.Of 186 animal pickups for which the county paid $6,295, the auditor could find pickup sheets for only 94. And those "were often incomplete," reported Brenda Dean, who conducted the September 1990 audit on behalf of county auditor Ronald S. Weinstein.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
A 37-year-old animal control officer was shot and wounded Tuesday night shortly after he investigated a report that dogs were being kept illegally in a South Baltimore house and had seized a dog from another residence in a separate call, according to city officials. Jermaine Barnes, who has been on the job for four years, was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center for a gunshot wound to his hand and released. Mayor Sheila Dixon visited him while he was at the hospital. Police have not made any arrests, but the city's chief police spokesman, Anthony Guglielmi, said detectives "are trying to figure out if it was related to the course of his duty or if it was random gunfire."
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 19, 2002
In Baltimore City Group seeking to cut size of City Council gathers more names A group that wants to shrink the size of Baltimore's City Council submitted 7,320 more petition signatures to the mayor's office yesterday, bolstering its bid to get the plan on the November ballot. At last count, Community and Labor United for Baltimore (CLUB) lacked about 4,000 of the 10,000 petition signatures needed to place the issue before voters. But the names submitted yesterday do not automatically put the effort over the top because city election officials must confirm that petition signers are registered city voters.
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