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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Advocates for animals packed an Annapolis hearing room Wednesday in support of a recently negotiated compromise bill that would undo a court ruling last year that declared pit bulls inherently dangerous and made its easier to sue their owners and their owners' landlords. Representatives of the Humane Society of the United State, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and other groups told the House Judiciary Committee that the legislation, which would tighten liability standards for dog owners but not distinguish among breeds, strikes a fair balance between the interests of pet owners and dog bite victims.
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NEWS
By Dr. David Tayman, DVM | January 9, 2014
Q: My recently widowed grandmother is interested in getting a pet to keep her company. What pet might be a good fit for a senior? A: Numerous studies have shown that companion animals help seniors stay more healthy and active, so this is an idea worth exploring. The trick is making a good choice in harmony with your grandmother's health, activity level and home situation. Both cats and dogs can be great companions. But unless your grandmother is up for an exhausting adventure for the first year or two, I'd suggest getting an adult rather than a puppy or kitten.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 9, 2010
Carrying signs with slogans like "No awards for dog killers" and "Cowards abuse animals," Tuesday evening about 100 protesters picketed the award ceremony at which convicted dogfighter Michael Vick received an award for his courage and sportsmanship. Protesters, many holding pictures of Vick's mutilated fighting dogs, and a few with dogs of their own on leashes, lined the road leading to the Martin's West banquet hall, where the Philadelphia Eagles backup quarterback, was set to accept the Ed Block Courage Award Foundation's coveted honor.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Advocates for animals packed an Annapolis hearing room Wednesday in support of a recently negotiated compromise bill that would undo a court ruling last year that declared pit bulls inherently dangerous and made its easier to sue their owners and their owners' landlords. Representatives of the Humane Society of the United State, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and other groups told the House Judiciary Committee that the legislation, which would tighten liability standards for dog owners but not distinguish among breeds, strikes a fair balance between the interests of pet owners and dog bite victims.
FEATURES
July 23, 1993
As children leave movie houses after watching a tear-jerker about a young boy's attempt to free a whale, they're being urged to join the cause of animal rights activists.In 20 states across the nation, including California, Florida and Texas, animal advocates are handing out leaflets outside theaters showing the Warner Bros. film "Free Willy."The pamphlets ask those moved by the film to work to free captive killer whales from marine theme parks.It's a not a new effort. Earlier this year, the same groups organized a letter-writing campaign to "Free Shamu," one of Sea World's star attractions.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
Animal Advocates of Howard County is planning its Walk For Paws for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Lake Elkhorn. Contests ("Biggest Ears, Best Tail Wagger"), activities, and demonstrations for dogs and people are planned. Dogs are welcome, as are people without dogs. Homeless pets looking for permanent homes will be available. Proceeds from the walk will help saves the lives of cats and dogs. Information: 410-880-2488, Ext. 4. Columbia Clippers set swim clinic The Columbia Clippers, the swim team of the Columbia Aquatics Association, will be hosts for a "Mutual of Omaha Breakout!
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Howard County is organizing an expanded deer hunt this fall in the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area -- despite objections from animal advocates -- as part of a countywide effort to control a burgeoning population that is causing major damage, officials say.According to estimates in a Howard County Deer Task Force Study conducted from 1996 and released late last week -- but due two years ago -- the animals are causing more than 1,000 traffic accidents a...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
In an effort to expand hours at the Howard County Animal Shelter, advocates are stepping up a petition drive to increase its budget. Ann Selnick, a member of Animal Advocates of Howard County, a community group that volunteers at the shelter, said nearly 1,000 signatures have been collected and more are being solicited. Selnick said her group is willing to do whatever it takes to persuade officials to keep the shelter open longer. "We want to be in there saving lives," Selnick said. "We don't want to be out there getting signatures.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
After canceling a deer hunt in January in Howard County's Middle Patuxent Environmental Area, County Executive James N. Robey will allow hunting to resume on the 1,000-acre preserve this winter.The decision -- welcomed by hunters and beleaguered suburbanites, but scorned by animal advocates -- comes as a long-awaited report on the county's deer population and ways to control it is due.Robey revealed his plan this week without waiting for the report, but refused yesterday to explain his reasons until meeting with animal advocates and other interested parties.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
Eleven deer were killed and three others were wounded in the first two days of bow hunting this week at Blandair, the undeveloped park in central Columbia, angering local animal advocates. Phil Norman, deer hunting project director for the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks, said three bucks, including one mature male and two younger ones, and eight does were taken by a total of 38 hunters in tree stands Wednesday and yesterday. Three deer were hit by arrows but ran away, Norman said, something that also happens during firearm hunts.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
A group of animal activists is asking Gov. Martin O'Malley to quickly introduce legislation that would override a Maryland Court of Appeals decision deeming all pit bulls dangerous. Maryland Votes for Animals and similar organizations are urging residents to call the governor's office Tuesday to lobby him to act during the special General Assembly session scheduled to begin Monday. "We feel this is terribly important," said Carolyn Kilborn, chair and founder of Maryland Votes for Animals.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Erica Carter's move from Pasadena to Baltimore was difficult, she said, not because of the lack of housing options, but because many places would not allow her pit bull Bailey. Though Carter has settled into a rental near Patterson Park, she said the search was daunting. And she fears it will only get worse with her next move after last week's Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that pit bulls are inherently dangerous animals. The court's decision could have far-reaching implications for landlords and dog owners who rent.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
They sat in the courtroom, witnesses for Phoenix. They wouldn't be called to testify in the trial of the twin brothers accused of setting fire to the pit bull that came to be given that hopeful name. But their presence, they said, served as testimony that the dog's life and her terrible death mattered. "Phoenix needs a voice. She needs never to be forgotten because a life is a life," said Chris Lomagno, among the handful of animal lovers who are following the case as it unfolds in Baltimore Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
Marya Tregellas Strong, a retired volunteer and animal-rights advocate, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 29 at Stella Maris Hospice. The Homeland resident was 89. Born Marya Tregellas in Baltimore and raised on Enfield Road, she attended Bryn Mawr and Roland Park Country schools. Her father, John Tregellas, was a real estate developer who worked in Anneslie and Parkville. After high school, she attended the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she met her future husband, Lloyd A. Tinker, an Army veteran who worked for the Atomic Energy Commission at Los Alamos, N.M. While there, she developed a lifelong love of southwestern Native American culture and art, family members said.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 9, 2010
Carrying signs with slogans like "No awards for dog killers" and "Cowards abuse animals," Tuesday evening about 100 protesters picketed the award ceremony at which convicted dogfighter Michael Vick received an award for his courage and sportsmanship. Protesters, many holding pictures of Vick's mutilated fighting dogs, and a few with dogs of their own on leashes, lined the road leading to the Martin's West banquet hall, where the Philadelphia Eagles backup quarterback, was set to accept the Ed Block Courage Award Foundation's coveted honor.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
For years Darlene Sanders Harris donated money to the Ed Block Courage Awards Foundation and looked forward to the annual ceremony in Baltimore where she could mingle with the NFL players who won the prestigious honor and hear their inspiring stories. But as the Ed Block organization formally announces its winners today, the Glen Burnie animal advocate, along with at least a thousand others, will be protesting, appalled that the Philadelphia Eagles' Michael Vick, just released from prison for his role in a brutal dog-fighting operation, was chosen to be on the winners list.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2000
WOULDN'T YOU love to see your son or daughter go through an entire year of school without missing a day? Or have perfect attendance during middle school? Could you ever dream that one of your children could attend all 13 years of school with perfect attendance? Well, that's what Lauren Gray did. Lauren, a senior at Glenelg High School, has had perfect attendance during her 13 years in Howard County public schools. Last week, at an awards ceremony at her school, she was honored with a plaque and certificate for her accomplishment.
NEWS
November 30, 1995
The Maryland Chiropractic Association has named Dr. Scott Lawrence, who practices in Elkridge, as its 1995 Chiropractor of the Year.The award was given to Dr. Lawrence at the association's convention last month."
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