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By Amanda J. Crawford | August 31, 2000
State and county officials, representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant and its neighbors have decided to continue meeting - apparently the only official decision reached in the latest attempt to resolve a dispute over plans for an emissions-control system using potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia. After a meeting at the state Department of Environment headquarters in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, they gave differing accounts on anything else that may have been accomplished to change the plans of Constellation Power Source Generation, which took over operation of the plant in a corporate restructuring of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. "There was no assurance given by BGE officials that they were going to abandon the anhydrous ammonia alternative in the near term," said Del. John R. Leopold, who was one of the Solley community's legislators present.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Suspicious characters hovered near the railroad tracks in New Windsor. As the loaded freight train approached, a loud explosion disturbed the calm of a balmy June day. Then a cloud of thick white smoke spewed from a rail car and drifted ominously above the rooftops in the small town of 1,400. Hundreds were evacuated from their homes. The injured - suffering severe respiratory distress, lacerations and abrasions - lay moaning, while stilled bodies were spread across the grass near the town carnival grounds.
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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
State and county officials, representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant and its neighbors have decided to continue meeting - apparently the only official decision reached in the latest attempt to resolve a dispute over plans for an emissions-control system using potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia. After a meeting at the state Department of Environment headquarters in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, they gave differing accounts on anything else that may have been accomplished to change the plans of Constellation Power Source Generation, which took over operation of the plant in a corporate restructuring of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. "There was no assurance given by BGE officials that they were going to abandon the anhydrous ammonia alternative in the near term," said Del. John R. Leopold, who was one of the Solley community's legislators present.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
At first, Danny Akin couldn't figure out why someone would want to steal anhydrous ammonia from the locked tanks in back of his store near Topeka, Kan. The fertilizer can nauseate people, burn their skin and "if you get some in your eye, you'll probably lose it," says Akin, who manages STE Ag Services, a farming supply business, and wears gloves and goggles when he handles anhydrous ammonia. But four years, untold broken locks and nearly 50 thefts later, Akin knows why people steal the toxic substance -- to produce an illegal drug called methamphetamine, otherwise known as speed or meth.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Concerns about the safety of a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. plan to truck anhydrous ammonia to its Brandon Shores power plant for a new pollution-control system have prompted a pair of letters from area legislators: one urging the use of alternative technology, the other addressing a highway traffic issue. The letters were drafted this week by Democratic Sen. Philip C. Jimeno and Republican Del. John R. Leopold, both of the 31st District, and also were signed by the district's other delegates, Democrats Mary M. Rosso and Joan Cadden.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Once again, residents in northern Anne Arundel County are gearing up to fight the big power company next door. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plans to truck a common but hazardous chemical down a road where traffic accidents are frequent has raised community outrage - though the anhydrous ammonia is destined for a new pollution-control system at the coal-fueled Brandon Shores plant. Community leaders have collected nearly 1,000 signatures against the plan since a neighborhood meeting Tuesday, when most residents learned about BGE's 1998 decision to truck about 7,000 gallons of a pressurized form of the gas into the complex daily as part of a new emission-reduction system.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2000
Solley-area leaders plan to present the County Council tonight with petitions signed by an estimated 1,500 residents who oppose plans to truck a potentially hazardous chemical into a Brandon Shores power plant, community organizers said. It is an attempt, they said, to shed additional light on concerns about anhydrous ammonia, an industrial chemical used to reduce air pollution, but one which can cause severe lung damage and death in extreme exposures. "Petitions are an effective tool to get the attention of the council as well as the county executive," said Del. Mary M. Rosso, a Solley Democrat.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
At first, Danny Akin couldn't figure out why someone would want to steal anhydrous ammonia from the locked tanks in back of his store near Topeka, Kan. The fertilizer can nauseate people, burn their skin and "if you get some in your eye, you'll probably lose it," says Akin, who manages STE Ag Services, a farming supply business, and wears gloves and goggles when he handles anhydrous ammonia. But four years, untold broken locks and nearly 50 thefts later, Akin knows why people steal the toxic substance -- to produce an illegal drug called methamphetamine, otherwise known as speed or meth.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
For the first time, County Executive Janet S. Owens is turning her attention to Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plans to truck a hazardous chemical into the Brandon Shores power plant in north Anne Arundel County. Owens will meet with BGE and county officials next week to discuss the plans and the community's concerns. BGE's proposal to import anhydrous ammonia for a new anti-pollution system - which will let the plant comply with a court order to reduce emissions - has sparked outrage among the plant's Solley neighbors.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
Siding with worried Solley residents, the County Council passed a resolution last night urging the operator of the Brandon Shores power plant to scrap plans to haul a hazardous material through the neighborhood. The vote was 5-1, with Councilman Bill D. Burlison voting no because of the issue's technical nature. Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle abstained, citing an unspecified potential conflict of interest. The action cannot force the company to do anything. Councilwoman Shirley Murphy, the resolution's sponsor, hopes to put pressure on Constellation Power Source, which operates the plant formerly owned by its sister company, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. The move cheered Solley residents who object to Constellation's plan to use anhydrous ammonia - a common industrial chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death in cases of extreme exposure - in a system designed to reduce pollution at the coal-fired Brandon Shores plant.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
LEXINGTON, Neb. - Here in the heart of America's heartland, healthy corn crops, juicy steaks, amiable neighbors and winning Cornhusker football teams are the pleasures that have long kept people happy. But recently, folks here have experimented with a different pleasure. This one's illegal. Methamphetamine, a stimulant long prevalent on the East and West coasts, pushed by rogue motorcycle gangs, has become a new pastime. Take a population admired for rural innocence, mix in a powerful, available drug that breeds violence, and the results are stunning.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | October 15, 2000
THIS COULD BE Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s last chance to befriend its neighbors. I thought the utility was finally mending its fractured relationship with the northeastern Anne Arundel County community when it agreed to stop storing fly ash - a byproduct of coal-burning - at its Brandon Shores plant. The company and the community had battled for 17 years, and peace finally was at hand. Then came anhydrous ammonia and more mistrust. Peace is here again. The utility has dropped plans to truck potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia in favor of a community-approved ammonia substance it will use to reduce nitrogen oxide while burning coal.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2000
Bending to a four-month protest by Solley area residents, Constellation Power Source Generation has agreed to abandon a plan to decrease emissions at the Brandon Shores power plant by using potentially dangerous anhydrous ammonia that would have been transported through the neighborhood daily. During a closed three-hour mediation session Thursday night with representatives of the northern Anne Arundel County community, the company agreed to use aqueous ammonia, a liquid viewed as less dangerous than anhydrous ammonia, which can cause severe lung damage and death in extreme exposure.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
In an attempt to settle a dispute that has simmered all summer, mediators are scheduled to bring together Constellation Power Source Generation officials and Solley-area residents tomorrow to talk about the company's plan to truck a potentially hazardous chemical through their neighborhood every day. Mediators from the Maryland Alternative Dispute Resolution Commission will facilitate the discussion concerning the Brandon Shores power plant's proposal to...
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
In an attempt to settle a dispute that has simmered all summer, mediators are scheduled to bring together tomorrow Constellation Power Source Generation officials and Solley-area residents to talk about the company's plan to truck a potentially hazardous chemical through their neighborhood every day. Mediators from the Maryland Alternative Dispute Resolution Commission will facilitate the discussion concerning the Brandon Shores power plant's proposal to...
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
State and county officials, representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant and its neighbors have decided to continue meeting - apparently the only official decision reached in the latest attempt to resolve a dispute over plans for an emissions-control system using potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia. After a meeting at the state Department of Environment headquarters in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, they gave differing accounts on anything else that may have been accomplished to change the plans of Constellation Power Source Generation, which took over operation of the plant in a corporate restructuring of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. "There was no assurance given by BGE officials that they were going to abandon the anhydrous ammonia alternative in the near term," said Del. John R. Leopold, who was one of the Solley community's legislators present.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
In a setback for those worried about trucks filled with a hazardous chemical turning into Baltimore Gas and Electric's north county complex, state highway officials said they doubt they will upgrade the traffic signal at Fort Smallwood Road and Energy Parkway. Local legislators and BGE have pushed the State Highway Administration for months to install a turn-on-green-only left-turn signal at the entrance to BGE's Brandon Shores complex, the site of 10 accidents since the start of the year.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
County and state elected officials are scrambling to broker a deal between irate Solley residents and the operator of the Brandon Shores power plant, hoping to resolve the dispute over plans to haul a hazardous material through North County. One of the options being considered is using an independent arbitrator to help work through the issue, which centers on the power company's plans to truck 7,000 gallons of anhydrous ammonia - a common industrial chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death with extreme exposure - into the plant's complex daily.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford | August 31, 2000
State and county officials, representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant and its neighbors have decided to continue meeting - apparently the only official decision reached in the latest attempt to resolve a dispute over plans for an emissions-control system using potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia. After a meeting at the state Department of Environment headquarters in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, they gave differing accounts on anything else that may have been accomplished to change the plans of Constellation Power Source Generation, which took over operation of the plant in a corporate restructuring of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. "There was no assurance given by BGE officials that they were going to abandon the anhydrous ammonia alternative in the near term," said Del. John R. Leopold, who was one of the Solley community's legislators present.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | August 13, 2000
COME on in, Lester Ettlinger said, ushering me to the deck of his Stoney Beach townhouse. "I want to show you why I don't want this bad stuff in my neighborhood." The deck overlooks Mr. Ettlinger's personal paradise, a narrow stretch of sandy beach that hugs calm Stony Creek, which spills into the Patapsco River. In the creek, a loon plunged into the water to fish. Speedboats raced past. Ducks flew overhead. So did a hawk. It's peaceful here. This is perfection to Mr. Ettlinger, who moved to Stoney Beach in March after living most of his 61 years in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood.
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