Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAngola
IN THE NEWS

Angola

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 12, 1991
The Marxist president of Angola, Jose Eduardo dos Santos, and the U.S.-backed guerrilla leader, Jonas Savimbi, will take their quarrel from the bush and battlefield to elections, where both may lose to forces not yet in the field. The Angola accord, with a cease-fire to take effect this month, ends a horrible 16-year war that took some 300,000 lives and produced no winners.Without 50,000 Cuban troops, 1,000 East German secret policemen and Soviet weapons and aid, the MPLA government of Mr. dos Santos would have fallen in a month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2010
Eric Gordon scored a game-high 21 points to lead the United States in a 92-57 rout of Tunisia that gave the Americans an unblemished record in the preliminary round of the FIBA World Championship in Istanbul. Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook each scored 14 points as the U.S. finished atop Group B at 5-0. The Americans next play Monday against Angola, the fourth-place finisher from Group A. "In practice we have to get better," U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski said.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 15, 1990
The winds of Eastern Europe are sweeping East Africa. The ruling Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola has resolved to end its Marxist monopoly on power and introduce multi-party democracy. This will meet the condition of the U.S.-backed rebel leader, Jonas Savimbi, for a cease-fire in the 15-year-old civil war.Mr. Savimbi, after meetings this week with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze and President Bush, said a cease-fire was near and elections likely next year. Score another gain for the partnership that the U.S. and U.S.S.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
LUANDA, Angola - -Hillary Clinton made the first visit to Angola by a U.S. secretary of state in seven years, trying Sunday to strengthen relations with a growing oil producer that is being aggressively courted by China. Clinton sought to emphasize the positive in her two-day visit, praising Angola's efforts to rebuild after a 27-year civil war that ended in 2002. But during a meeting in Parliament, opposition politicians urged her to press for more democratic behavior from President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who has been in power for three decades.
NEWS
By Sunday Nation, Nairobi, Kenya | February 12, 1991
FOR THE United States in particular, [the reform proposals are] a chance to amends for the deaths, injuries and economic losses occasioned on Angola through U.S. support to [rebel] Unita.It will also be a major prop for President Jose dos Santos who, at this difficult time, needs all the support he can get from every quarter. With goodwill and support from all, the Angolan case could be Africa's success story this year, second only to the release last February of South Africa's foremost nationalist, Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Jose Patricio | April 11, 1993
The Angolan government and UNITA (Union for the Total Independence of Angola) are scheduled to resume their long-delayed direct negotiations tomorrow in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, under the mediation of the United Nations.This will be only the third round of U.N.-mediated talks since last October when UNITA, under its leader Jonas Savimbi (who once enjoyed U.S. and South African support) took up arms following its defeat in elections certified as free and fair by the United Nations and the Bush administration.
NEWS
October 15, 1992
What if you held a free election that observers called fair in a Communist-ruled country wracked 16 years by civil war, and the Communists won? They would swear, of course, to being ex-Marxists. This is what happened in Angola. The election the United States had sought was held, and the U.S. is properly abiding by its results.The founding president of Angola, Agostinho Neto, turned it into as close to a Communist state as African conditions allow. On his death in 1979, successor Jose Eduardo dos Santos kept his faith.
NEWS
By WITNEY W. SCHNEIDMAN | September 27, 1992
The southern African nation of Angola will hold its first-ever elections Tuesday. The elections are likely to be without incident, but the prospects for genuine peace in this war-torn nation are far from certain.On May 31, 1991, Jose Eduardo dos Santos of the governing Popular Liberation Movement of Angola (MPLA) and Jonas Savimbi of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) signed the Angola peace accords in Lisbon that mandated the legislative and presidential elections.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
LUANDA, Angola - -Hillary Clinton made the first visit to Angola by a U.S. secretary of state in seven years, trying Sunday to strengthen relations with a growing oil producer that is being aggressively courted by China. Clinton sought to emphasize the positive in her two-day visit, praising Angola's efforts to rebuild after a 27-year civil war that ended in 2002. But during a meeting in Parliament, opposition politicians urged her to press for more democratic behavior from President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who has been in power for three decades.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 21, 1994
LUSAKA, Zambia -- The enemies who have fought since 1975 for control of Angola signed a treaty here yesterday promising to end the last war in southern Africa and to collaborate in rebuilding their rich and devastated country.The accord, which calls for the guns to fall silent tomorrow, is the third such pledge to end Angola's relentless fratricide. But it is the first to guarantee a share of power to the UNITA rebel movement, and the first to be backed by plans to deploy thousands of armed U.N. peacekeepers.
SPORTS
By Mark Heisler and Mark Heisler,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 12, 2008
BEIJING - With the U.S. men's basketball team determined not to overlook anybody, what can the Americans come up with for tonight's opponent, Angola? How about, they don't discourage easily? With all the reversals the U.S. has suffered in recent international competition, there was always some team it could beat, not to mention beat on. The Dream Team made its debut against Angola in Barcelona in 1992, winning, 116-48, although the 68-point victory margin isn't what it's remembered for. Nor was it because of the 46-1 run the U.S. went on with the score tied, 7-7, making it 53-8.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | August 26, 2006
Initially, it appeared Jason Harris had suddenly lost his balance and was on his way to a terrible fall. But then, the Baltimore resident extended his arms and not only broke his fall but continued moving, contorting his nimble body like a break dancer, yoga specialist or martial-arts expert. Harris was practicing capoeira, a Brazilian martial art created by African slaves that subsequently blossomed into a form of artistic expression. In 2002, Harris helped form the Baltimore chapter of the International Capoeira Angola Foundation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and David Kohn and Scott Calvert and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Some of the viruses are already notorious, such as Ebola and HIV. Others have less familiar names: Marburg and Lassa fever. But they share one feature: All have emerged in recent decades from sub-Saharan Africa, perplexing scientists and, in the case of HIV, killing millions. Africa is now recognized as an ideal incubator for new pathogens: It has rapidly growing human populations and high biodiversity, along with widespread poverty, poor medical care and, in many countries, armed conflict that forces civilians to flee far from their homes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- International health specialists battling an outbreak of Marburg virus in Angola suspect unorthodox medical practices by local traditional healers may be contributing to the spread of the deadly disease. The experts suggest that the healers, who lack medical training and supplies but substitute for doctors in many rural African communities, are administering injections in homes or in makeshift clinics with reused needles or syringes. In the northern Angolan province of Uige, where 233 people have died of the Marburg virus, epidemiologists say they must convince people that such practices can mean death.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | April 19, 2005
A WEEK AGO today I returned from a six-week visit to Angola, Madagascar and India. After 13 flights, three overnight trains, two boats and what seemed like a thousand miles on rutted, flooded roadways, the conclusion is that getting there decidedly is not part of the fun. In Angola, the first leg of this Third World odyssey was spent on roadways that have not been much improved since the end of the civil war that gripped that country for nearly 30...
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | March 29, 2005
ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar - Forgive me for not writing sooner. I've been out of touch with the First World, visiting some of the poorest and most endangered people on the planet here and in Angola. It has been a profoundly humbling experience. Often when I write from overseas these days, I try to do at least one piece on the search for a decent martini in strange places. I did have one in Luanda, the capital of Angola, under the shade of an umbrella at a place overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 21, 1994
LUSAKA, Zambia -- After 19 years of civil war and 12 months of intense negotiations to stop it, the Angolan government yesterday signed a long-awaited peace agreement with the country's UNITA rebels.But even as the two sides agreed to peace, warfare continued in their embattled homeland.If the agreement holds, it would end one of Africa's longest and bloodiest conflicts, a war that killed more than a half-million people and made refugees of two million more, a fight that began when Gerald Ford sat in the White House and Leonid Brezhnev occupied the Kremlin.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 2, 1991
LUANDA, Angola -- It's Sunday morning in Luanda, and the open-air market known as Plaza Congolesa is abuzz with activity as shoppers squeeze past stalls crammed full of goods of every kind.The goods are organized in careful order, with produce and meat stalls in one busy section, imported liquors a few rows away and electronic goods near the far end of the market. This is the Macy's of open-air African markets. It has everything from every part of the world, thanks to Angola's busy port, which receives imported goods from across the globe to compensate for the collapse in industry at home.
SPORTS
By Steve Springer and Steve Springer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 24, 2004
ATHENS - Where's Charles Barkley when you need him? Without Barkley to create an international scene with his old friends from Angola as he did in the 1992 Olympics with a vicious elbow smash, there was nothing to distinguish yesterday's men's basketball game between Angola and the United States from all those runaway laughers back when the U.S. Dream Team really was a dream team. Tim Duncan softly laid the ball into the hoop to begin the game, the U.S. team raced to a five-point lead and it was never caught, running up a 40-point advantage at one point before cruising to an 89-53 victory at the Helliniko Indoor Arena.
FEATURES
May 31, 2004
May 31 1889: More than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. 1962: World War II Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel for his role in the Nazi Holocaust. 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. 1989: House Speaker Jim Wright, dogged by questions about his ethics, announced he would resign. 1991: Leaders of Angola's two warring factions signed a peace treaty, ending a 16-year-old civil war.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.