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By GARY DIAMOND | June 6, 1993
One of the most popular species of fish in the nation has a face only its mother could love -- catfish. They're found in most freshwater lakes, rivers, streams and brackish water bays throughout the continental United States.In Harford County, large numbers can be found residing in Conowingo Lake, the Susquehanna River and throughout the upper reaches of Chesapeake Bay, especially in areas north and east of Pooles Island.Catfish are like cars. They come in a large variety of colors, sizes and models.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass. NRP said it shot video to prove in court that the anglers were targeting striped bass and not accidentally catching them while chasing other species.
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NEWS
By Sue Hayes | September 22, 1991
It's not the most popular fish around and it certainly isn't the easiest to catch. In fact, the tautog is downright ugly and slimy, but it's wonderful to eat and certainly gives the angler an excellent fight.The tautog, also called a blackfish, is a member of the wrasse family. Though it somewhat resembles a sea bass, they are not related.With the cooling water temperatures, the tautog are moving from offshore waters into the inlet areas. The Ocean City Inlet and the Indian River Inlet are the best places to find this crafty, hard-fighting fish.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Pardon Dee Tochterman if she doesn't have time for more than a quick hello. She has worms to wash. Thousands of them. Every day from spring to late fall, Tochterman is the head worm wrangler at T.G. Tochterman & Sons, the 94-year-old tackle shop on Eastern Avenue. Her specialty is bloodworms, the nasty critters from the mud flats of Maine and Canada that squirt blood and bite. Anglers love them. But the fish of the Chesapeake Bay — stripers, spot and croaker — love them even more.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | June 27, 1993
Offshore fishing action has begun in earnest, with the waters off Ocean City alive with mako sharks.Several were caught this past week, most over 100 pounds. The largest mako shark was taken by angler Curtis Carnell aboard the Jazzey Sazzey with Capt. Lee Fickinger. The mako, which weighed 263 pounds, was hooked northeast of the Jackspot.The party also released another mako shark as well as a dusky shark. Most of the sharks have been taken in this location or in the Fingers area. The best bait is mackerel or bluefish.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 17, 1992
Bluefish is the fare in May.Blues, weighing up to 15 pounds, are migrating north from a leisurely stay in the South. After the long swim, they are lean and very hungry.Since there is little natural bait in the surf this time of year, the blues don't stay long. They come tearing close to the beach, chasing schools of sand eels, bunker or an early bunch of shiners. They may remain only 15 to 45 minutes, so the surf angler must be ready.To catch the blues, an angler must heave a long surf pole, 10 to 15 feet, as far as possible.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 16, 1993
Anglers in Ocean City are happy to see schools of bluefish working the waters off the beach. Fishermen have been grabbing their fishing gear and heading to the surf, the inlets, the U.S. 50 Bridge and the Ocean Pier to catch these 3- to 12-pound fish. The blues, which showed up two weeks ago, will probably be with us for a couple more weeks before heading offshore or farther north.Pat Townsend of the Ocean Pier said that anglers were hooking as many as 20 bluefish in a span of an hour and a half on Springfest weekend.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Write | August 9, 1992
August continues to see good catches of flounder in Ocean City. Some years, the flounder do a disappearing act in August, but not this year. Anglers in boats are picking them up in all areas of the bay. From the bay behind Assateague to the U.S. Route 50 bridge, there is definitely action. Although a lot of flounder are being released, flounder under Maryland's legal size limit of 13 inches -- the keepers -- are there.William Cecil, Billy Cecil and Walter Cecil (a grandfather-son-grandson team)
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | April 26, 1992
Anglers hoping for a warm Easter weekend filled with fish-catching possibilities were disappointed. Though Good Friday was a beautiful day, the fog rolled in on Saturday and kept the water temperature down. A cool breeze from the northeast made a jacket mandatory for most on the water.Because of the weather, Ocean City flounder have been off to a slow start. Although many anglers venturing out on their own came up empty-handed, the bay party boat Tortuga out of Bahia Marina at 22nd Street caught some.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1992
Anglers awaiting the arrival of the bluefish were moved to abrupt action as a huge school of fish suddenly appeared at the Ocean City Inlet last Sunday afternoon. The Inlet came alive with boiling bluefish, chopping at almost anything thrown at them. The fish, running 2 to 4 pounds, were taking bucktails, plugs, spoons or bait.Mark Fleming of Delmarva Sporting Center grabbed his boat and found the blues boiling around the Old Railroad Bridge. Casting chunks of bunker and herring, Mr. Fleming and a friend caught 30 blues weighing in at 5 to 7 pounds.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
Seven years ago on a sweltering August day in Alabama, I watched professional bass fishermen put ice in their livewells before they put an iced drink to their lips. For them, killing a fish was unthinkable, and not just because they would be penalized by Bassmaster Classic officials and jeopardize their chance to win $200,000. They also knew that sloppy fish handling would diminish their standing as sportsmen. No matter where it happens, a fish kill also is a black eye for the tournament, the sponsors, the state natural resources agency charged with protecting fish and the reputation of the body of water.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
It's Mr. Doughball and the Gefilte Fisherman against the world this week along the banks of the St. Lawrence River in a contest to see who can reel in the biggest bottom feeders. The World Carp Championship has come to U.S. shores for the first time, attracting a field of 103 two-man teams that will fish nonstop from today until Friday morning in search of rod-bending fish the size of toddlers. Tommy Robinson of Baltimore, aka Mr. Doughball, and Mark Metzger of Silver Spring, aka the Gefilte Fisherman, haven't been competitive carpers for very long, not when compared with their rivals.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
TODAY'S a two-parter, including an intriguing new way to grade the health of the bay. But first we ponder a touching question about the nature of male marital fidelity -- is it true love, or just blood-lust and sex? The question arises from a recent ramble through the huge fish specimen collections at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science at Gloucester Point. A female angler fish, floating in preservative, caught my attention. No beauty she, dark and lumpy, with degenerate little eyes and a size and shape resembling a distorted football more than anything streamlined and fishlike.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The BASS Classic might want to consider an ice-fishing tournament, given the number of cubes being used each day by competitors trying to keep their catches cool. With an intense sun, temperatures hovering in the low 90s and humidity above 70 percent, it's an uphill battle, but one the anglers have to join. Each bass that dies before the afternoon weigh-in is a 4-ounce deduction for the angler. Down at Paradise Point Marina, the tournament's launch point on Lay Lake, a muscled worker slings 7-pound bags of ice into a cooler every morning and replenishes it in the afternoon.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2000
POSSUM RIDGE, Ky. - Bait a hook. Cast a line. Catch a fish. It's an activity as old as the hills, with demographics to match. Fishing? That's for retired folks, and bass fishing is for Bubba. That's a problem for the masterminds plotting the future of professional bass fishing, which has limited visibility even though its tournaments have made winners rich and famous. Sponsors demand fans - the younger and hipper, the better - and the promise of television coverage with head-snapping action.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Ahab had his White Whale. Scotland has the Loch Ness Monster. Columbia has a neon carp the size of a fire hydrant.For some 20 years -- legend has it -- a 3-foot, orange koi has prowled the waters of Jackson Pond in the Howard County planned community.No one seems to know how it got there.But area fishermen have tried everything to hook it: worms, corn, artificial lures.Neighborhood kids recently have taken to wading into the pond with nets.The big guy meanders away from them all -- more interested, it seems, in sucking up algae.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | April 26, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's fall recreational rockfish anglers are virtually guaranteed a longer season in October, with a more equitable distribution of stripers than last October, thanks to a tag system that would limit them to two fish for the entire season.The Striped Bass Advisory Board last night unanimously recommended a proposal that would offer fishermen a 17-day season -- including three weekends -- during which anglers could use both their tags.The season would start Oct. 11 and close Oct. 27. If they do not catch their still undecided quota during that time, two weeks later the fishery would be reopened to allow all anglers to catch the remainder of the quota under a traditional no-permit system.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
Seven years ago on a sweltering August day in Alabama, I watched professional bass fishermen put ice in their livewells before they put an iced drink to their lips. For them, killing a fish was unthinkable, and not just because they would be penalized by Bassmaster Classic officials and jeopardize their chance to win $200,000. They also knew that sloppy fish handling would diminish their standing as sportsmen. No matter where it happens, a fish kill also is a black eye for the tournament, the sponsors, the state natural resources agency charged with protecting fish and the reputation of the body of water.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
Kenneth Poff was among the first to hit the Gunpowder Falls and cast a line yesterday in what has become as much a rite of spring in Maryland as the first pitch at Opening Day for the Orioles: the official reopening of the trout season in Maryland."
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
John Dawkins spent yesterday morning fishing on a bridge over Saltpeter Creek adjacent to BGE's C.P. Crane power plant in eastern Baltimore County -- a relaxation ritual has attracted several dozen men each weekend for years."
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