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By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Special to the Sun | April 13, 2003
The first approach, no matter how you approach it, isn't all that impressive. From the main road, the profile beyond its moat is low, like a rough pencil sketch of Parliament along the Thames but less grand and imposing. The three visible spires, leaden in color, plump and oddly mottled at this distance, don't inspire. The camera comes out because it must. Through the view-finder, it all looks even lower and longer and like less of a wonder. But then -- wow. "Where are the words," wrote French naturalist-explorer Henri Mouhot, who happened upon nearly forgotten Angkor Wat in Cambodia in 1861, "to praise a work of art that may not have its equal anywhere on the globe?"
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By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | December 3, 2006
I'm planning a trip to Italy to visit Venice and Florence with my daughter. She is a glass blower and would like to take a factory tour and a class or workshop. Can you help us with ideas? You and your daughter will enjoy Venice and the island of Murano, famous for its glass-blowing artisans. Neither we nor the Italian Tourist Office were able to find classes for your daughter, but she'll get to watch craftsmen at work on Murano. Many factories are connected to glassware shops and are open to the public.
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By IAN JOHNSON and IAN JOHNSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1995
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- After a quarter century delay, the Terrace of the Leper King has finally been restored. Land mines no longer hinder a close-up look at the beatific faces of the Bayon Temple. Looters have been chased away from the temples and palaces that, a thousand years after being built, still define Cambodia's soul.For more than 20 years after the war in Indochina and the rampage of the Khmer Rouge that followed in Cambodia, Angkor Wat was practically unseen. Now Americans and other foreigners are returning to the splendid temples of gods and monuments to human kings.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
As the faithful organized prayer groups for Pope John Paul II, some members of the business community took a different tack - perceiving a huge demand and the opportunity to fill it. Catholic gift shops stocked up on CDs and DVD documentaries of the pope's life. Barnes & Noble Inc., the nation's top bookseller, sent messages to its stores about how to set up pope displays. And eBay aficionados quickly posted memorabilia of the pontiff for sale online. "I think you'll see a lot of that, and a lot of things created overnight.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | May 19, 1993
Angkor, located near Siem Reap in central Cambodia, has on of the world's greatest concentrations of supreme art, comparable in its abundance of quality only to Florence in Italy. The area has been barred to visitors since the late 1960s when the turmoil of the Vietnam war destabilized it. When I visited Angkor last November and then again in February, the door had just begun to creak open again. U.N. troops, stationed there as a peacekeeping force since 1991, had made the area relatively safe for motivated handfuls of tourists willing to pay a high price and to travel in groups.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1995
Q: My husband has read that a solar eclipse will be visible over part of southern Asia in late October. What companies offer tours to the region then?A: Several U.S. tour companies are arranging for the viewing of the total solar eclipse you refer to. It will occur over India, Cambodia and other countries in the region on Oct. 24.Because visibility of the eclipse -- in which the moon will completely block the sun for a brief period -- is dependent on weather, most tours are emphasizing sites that are historically clear and dry in late October.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 22, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The Khmer Rouge rebels warned yesterday that internationally supervised elections scheduled to begin tomorrow would "put fuel on the flames of war" in Cambodia and accused the United States of plotting to destroy the Maoist guerrilla group.The rebels, who are threatening to sabotage the United Nations-sponsored elections with violence and who have already been blamed for the deaths of 10 U.N. peacekeepers, said the election results would serve only to give legitimacy to the current Vietnamese-installed government.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | December 3, 2006
I'm planning a trip to Italy to visit Venice and Florence with my daughter. She is a glass blower and would like to take a factory tour and a class or workshop. Can you help us with ideas? You and your daughter will enjoy Venice and the island of Murano, famous for its glass-blowing artisans. Neither we nor the Italian Tourist Office were able to find classes for your daughter, but she'll get to watch craftsmen at work on Murano. Many factories are connected to glassware shops and are open to the public.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
As the faithful organized prayer groups for Pope John Paul II, some members of the business community took a different tack - perceiving a huge demand and the opportunity to fill it. Catholic gift shops stocked up on CDs and DVD documentaries of the pope's life. Barnes & Noble Inc., the nation's top bookseller, sent messages to its stores about how to set up pope displays. And eBay aficionados quickly posted memorabilia of the pontiff for sale online. "I think you'll see a lot of that, and a lot of things created overnight.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
A Memorable Place A baby rhino means hope in Zimbabwe By Gina Rumore SPECIAL TO THE SUN Through the 10-foot-tall pens made of scrawny mopane tree trunks, I catch a glimpse of a massive baby. Though less than a year old, it is already larger than the biggest pig I have ever seen -- though its body shape doesn't appear to be all that different. With a guard's permission, I wriggle my arm between two of the tree trunks and hold out my hand for the rhino to inspect. With its muscular upper lip, the baby probes the palm of my hand.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Special to the Sun | April 13, 2003
The first approach, no matter how you approach it, isn't all that impressive. From the main road, the profile beyond its moat is low, like a rough pencil sketch of Parliament along the Thames but less grand and imposing. The three visible spires, leaden in color, plump and oddly mottled at this distance, don't inspire. The camera comes out because it must. Through the view-finder, it all looks even lower and longer and like less of a wonder. But then -- wow. "Where are the words," wrote French naturalist-explorer Henri Mouhot, who happened upon nearly forgotten Angkor Wat in Cambodia in 1861, "to praise a work of art that may not have its equal anywhere on the globe?"
NEWS
By IAN JOHNSON and IAN JOHNSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1995
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- After a quarter century delay, the Terrace of the Leper King has finally been restored. Land mines no longer hinder a close-up look at the beatific faces of the Bayon Temple. Looters have been chased away from the temples and palaces that, a thousand years after being built, still define Cambodia's soul.For more than 20 years after the war in Indochina and the rampage of the Khmer Rouge that followed in Cambodia, Angkor Wat was practically unseen. Now Americans and other foreigners are returning to the splendid temples of gods and monuments to human kings.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1995
Q: My husband has read that a solar eclipse will be visible over part of southern Asia in late October. What companies offer tours to the region then?A: Several U.S. tour companies are arranging for the viewing of the total solar eclipse you refer to. It will occur over India, Cambodia and other countries in the region on Oct. 24.Because visibility of the eclipse -- in which the moon will completely block the sun for a brief period -- is dependent on weather, most tours are emphasizing sites that are historically clear and dry in late October.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 22, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The Khmer Rouge rebels warned yesterday that internationally supervised elections scheduled to begin tomorrow would "put fuel on the flames of war" in Cambodia and accused the United States of plotting to destroy the Maoist guerrilla group.The rebels, who are threatening to sabotage the United Nations-sponsored elections with violence and who have already been blamed for the deaths of 10 U.N. peacekeepers, said the election results would serve only to give legitimacy to the current Vietnamese-installed government.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | May 19, 1993
Angkor, located near Siem Reap in central Cambodia, has on of the world's greatest concentrations of supreme art, comparable in its abundance of quality only to Florence in Italy. The area has been barred to visitors since the late 1960s when the turmoil of the Vietnam war destabilized it. When I visited Angkor last November and then again in February, the door had just begun to creak open again. U.N. troops, stationed there as a peacekeeping force since 1991, had made the area relatively safe for motivated handfuls of tourists willing to pay a high price and to travel in groups.
NEWS
May 19, 1993
The role of church as sanctuary has persisted through history It is getting another workout in Cambodia, where the majestic temples of Angkor, which for a thousand years have defined Cambodian or Khmer culture, are taking on new visitors overnight.The Khmer Rouge guerrillas, fighting desperately to disrupt the elections scheduled for next week, attacked the provincial capital of Siem Reap on May 3, shooting up everyone and everything in sight. Since then, hundreds of villagers have taken their livestock to the temples of nearby Angkor every night for sanctuary, returning to their fields in morning.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
Columbia's Hua Sha Chinese Dance Center will present an "Asian Gala" dance and music concert Saturday at Jim Rouse Theatre in Columbia.The concert, which includes five groups from China, Korea, Cambodia, Japan and India, will celebrate Asian Heritage month.The concert's headliner, the Hua Sha (which means "Chinese" in that language) dance company, was founded in 1996 by celebrated Shanghai dancer and choreographer Xiao Fang Xu.The company, which has performed at Kennedy Center and the National Institutes of Health's Asian month celebrations, features advanced students and invited professional artists.
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