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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
EntreMed Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company that saw its stock soar in May on news of its promising cancer research, lost 47 percent of its value yesterday after Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. halted development of a critical drug.Shares in EntreMed fell $11.625, to $12.875, in heavy trading. The drop followed an announcement after Tuesday's close that Bristol-Myers will relinquish responsibility for developing the drug, angiostatin, to EntreMed.In May, Dr. Judah Folkman, a Harvard University scientist, said in a front-page article in the New York Times that he had combined angiostatin with another drug, endostatin, to eradicate tumors in laboratory mice.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2001
Peggy Klang died of cancer on a Wednesday morning. Her family had hoped that an experimental drug being developed by EntreMed Inc., of Rockville, would save her life. But as her mother watched over her late last month, she slipped from sleep in the hospital bed set up in her parents' family room. She was 48. Hours later, Chuck Sprenkle made the drive from the rowhouse his family recently bought him in Philadelphia to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital downtown. The chemotherapy he gets there has made him bald, tired and sometimes violently sick.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
One day after bad news about one promising cancer drug sent EntreMed Inc.'s shares tumbling, the Rockville biotechnology company's stock roared back yesterday after good news about another cancer drug.Shares doubled, rising $12.8125 to $25.6875, after government researchers said they had reproduced Dr. Judah Folkman's use of endostatin to shrink lung tumors in mice. On Wednesday, the company's shares fell $11.625, or 47 percent, after Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. pulled out of an agreement with EntreMed to develop angiostatin.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. - EntreMed Inc.'s experimental anti-cancer drug Angiostatin showed what could be early signs of effectiveness in patients who injected themselves with the drug at home, much like diabetes patients taking insulin, scientists reported here yesterday at an international conference on cancer research. Tumors didn't shrink dramatically in any of the 24 patients participating in a Phase I clinical trial in the Netherlands. But a number of patients' diseases had stabilized for months - no new tumors were detected while existing ones grew no more than 25 percent.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
A researcher who runs one of the nation's most closely watched cancer labs said yesterday that two new drugs that shrink tumors by starving them of their blood supply will likely be used to augment older therapies before they will be used alone.Dr. Judah Folkman, whose experiments touched off a media frenzy and a surge of interest on Wall Street earlier this year, said he was encouraged by studies at the University of Chicago that showed one of the drugs dramatically improved the effectiveness of radiation on cancerous mice.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and By Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
For Charles Sprenkle, hope comes at the tip of a needle. Five days a week for precisely 10 minutes, the 62-year-old sits patiently while a large syringe - 6 inches long, 1 inch wide - forces a clear liquid into his forearm. As a nurse depresses the plunger, the drug flows through his veins deep into his body where - if it works - it will choke the growth of the tiny blood vessels that feed malignant tumors. Sprenkle, like legions of other cancer victims, has thrown the dice on an experimental treatment.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. - EntreMed Inc.'s experimental anti-cancer drug Angiostatin showed what could be early signs of effectiveness in patients who injected themselves with the drug at home, much like diabetes patients taking insulin, scientists reported here yesterday at an international conference on cancer research. Tumors didn't shrink dramatically in any of the 24 patients participating in a Phase I clinical trial in the Netherlands. But a number of patients' diseases had stabilized for months - no new tumors were detected while existing ones grew no more than 25 percent.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave Rockville-based EntreMed Inc. the green light yesterday to begin human studies of Angiostatin, its widely touted experimental anti-cancer drug EntreMed shares, however, took a hit as technology investors grew jittery, and an analyst downgraded his recommendation on the stock. EntreMed closed down $4.125, or 9.5 percent, at $39.25. Shares traded as high as $69.50 on Jan. 20., their 52-week high. Yesterday's market reaction was in contrast to what occurred in May 1998 when shares in the small biotechnology outfit skyrocketed 330 percent in one day after a front-page Sunday New York Times article portrayed the protein behind the drug as a potential "cure" for cancer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2001
Peggy Klang died of cancer on a Wednesday morning. Her family had hoped that an experimental drug being developed by EntreMed Inc., of Rockville, would save her life. But as her mother watched over her late last month, she slipped from sleep in the hospital bed set up in her parents' family room. She was 48. Hours later, Chuck Sprenkle made the drive from the rowhouse his family recently bought him in Philadelphia to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital downtown. The chemotherapy he gets there has made him bald, tired and sometimes violently sick.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2002
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it plans to move its anti-cancer drug Angiostatin into additional clinical trials later this year after it proved safe, both when used alone and when used in combination with radiation. The Rockville company presented final results yesterday from a human test of the drug in combination with radiation at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The results showed that Angiostatin did not increase the toxic side effects of radiation -- safety results that were the major goal of the study.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and By Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
For Charles Sprenkle, hope comes at the tip of a needle. Five days a week for precisely 10 minutes, the 62-year-old sits patiently while a large syringe - 6 inches long, 1 inch wide - forces a clear liquid into his forearm. As a nurse depresses the plunger, the drug flows through his veins deep into his body where - if it works - it will choke the growth of the tiny blood vessels that feed malignant tumors. Sprenkle, like legions of other cancer victims, has thrown the dice on an experimental treatment.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave Rockville-based EntreMed Inc. the green light yesterday to begin human studies of Angiostatin, its widely touted experimental anti-cancer drug EntreMed shares, however, took a hit as technology investors grew jittery, and an analyst downgraded his recommendation on the stock. EntreMed closed down $4.125, or 9.5 percent, at $39.25. Shares traded as high as $69.50 on Jan. 20., their 52-week high. Yesterday's market reaction was in contrast to what occurred in May 1998 when shares in the small biotechnology outfit skyrocketed 330 percent in one day after a front-page Sunday New York Times article portrayed the protein behind the drug as a potential "cure" for cancer.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
One day after bad news about one promising cancer drug sent EntreMed Inc.'s shares tumbling, the Rockville biotechnology company's stock roared back yesterday after good news about another cancer drug.Shares doubled, rising $12.8125 to $25.6875, after government researchers said they had reproduced Dr. Judah Folkman's use of endostatin to shrink lung tumors in mice. On Wednesday, the company's shares fell $11.625, or 47 percent, after Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. pulled out of an agreement with EntreMed to develop angiostatin.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
EntreMed Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company that saw its stock soar in May on news of its promising cancer research, lost 47 percent of its value yesterday after Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. halted development of a critical drug.Shares in EntreMed fell $11.625, to $12.875, in heavy trading. The drop followed an announcement after Tuesday's close that Bristol-Myers will relinquish responsibility for developing the drug, angiostatin, to EntreMed.In May, Dr. Judah Folkman, a Harvard University scientist, said in a front-page article in the New York Times that he had combined angiostatin with another drug, endostatin, to eradicate tumors in laboratory mice.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
A researcher who runs one of the nation's most closely watched cancer labs said yesterday that two new drugs that shrink tumors by starving them of their blood supply will likely be used to augment older therapies before they will be used alone.Dr. Judah Folkman, whose experiments touched off a media frenzy and a surge of interest on Wall Street earlier this year, said he was encouraged by studies at the University of Chicago that showed one of the drugs dramatically improved the effectiveness of radiation on cancerous mice.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO - Shares of EntreMed Inc. fell nearly 21 percent yesterday after results of the first human tests of its two anti-tumor drugs failed to ignite investors' enthusiasm. The scientific presentations Sunday and yesterday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's meeting here marked the first release of complete results from Phase I clinical trials for Endostatin and Angiostatin. Investors reacted negatively, despite what the company and independent scientific investigators described as positive results.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 21, 1994
A discovery that may rank among the most important advances against cancer in recent decades -- identification of a natural hormone-like factor that keeps tumor growth under control -- was announced yesterday in Boston.Although it is not a cure for cancer, researchers said the factor eventually could become a potent anti-cancer weapon, a natural drug able to control the explosive growth of metastases, the tiny malignant "seeds" that spread cancer throughout the body.These secondary tumors, which can settle in vital organs such as the lungs, liver, bones and brain, are often more deadly than the original, killing patients even after the main tumor has been removed.
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