Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAngioplasty
IN THE NEWS

Angioplasty

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
My angina has grown steadily worse over the past three months despite what my cardiologist tells me is maximal drug treatment. She now recommends that I have either angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery. Could you give me some information that might help me to choose between these two procedures?The choice between angioplasty and coronary artery bypass surgery depends on many factors unique to each individual. These factors include the extent and location of your coronary artery disease, the presence of other medical illnesses and your attitudes and lifestyle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
The Maryland Health Care Commission sent recommendations Wednesday to the General Assembly on stepping up oversight of coronary stent placements. They come amid accusations that three doctors were performing unnecessary procedures, but the recommendations were meant to deal more generally with the state's outdated review process for hospitals offering angioplasty and cardiac surgery. Authorities had given some hospitals waivers to offer angioplasty when a patient was having a heart attack, even though the facilities did not have on-site cardiac surgical backup, because research showed it was safe.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 28, 1993
Women who undergo coronary balloon angioplasty have a higher hospital death rate than men, but the difference has more to do with the severity of the disease than any inherent difference in the arteries of men and women, a Mayo Clinic study has found.The study thus appears to dispel fears that women who undergo angioplasty were at higher risk because of their smaller coronary arteries, but it also raises the question of why women are sicker than men when they undergo the procedure.One explanation might be a bias in how women are referred for angioplasty, but the difference may also be the result of women feeling symptoms differently than men. Or there may be some other explanation.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | June 8, 2009
For most patients with diabetes and clogged arteries who have not had a heart attack, treatment with drugs and lifestyle changes are as effective at reducing death as immediate bypass surgery or angioplasty, researchers said Sunday. For diabetics with a more severe form of heart disease requiring immediate surgery, bypass surgery is more effective than angioplasty at reducing heart attacks and strokes but not deaths, researchers reported at a meeting of the American Diabetes Association in New Orleans.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 22, 1994
Q: My wife has suffered from chest pain. A cardiologist made a diagnosis of angina due to coronary disease. He has recommended a coronary angiogram and then angioplasty if necessary. We would like to know the effectiveness and risks of angioplasty.A: Angioplasty involves the passage of a tiny, uninflated balloon to the site of narrowing in the coronary artery. Once in place the balloon is inflated several times to flatten the fatty plaque inside the artery and let blood flow more freely.About 90 percent of the time, angioplasty results in a significant widening of the artery and in improvement in symptoms.
NEWS
March 21, 2003
Carroll Commissioner Dean L. Minnich will be on light duty for the next week while he recuperates from an angioplasty procedure, county officials said yesterday. During a routine physical and stress test, Minnich's doctor detected arterial blockage and ordered a catheterization. Minnich, 60, said he had been experiencing fatigue but had no other telling symptoms. Minnich underwent the procedure Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Surgeons corrected what was a 90 percent blockage with angioplasty and a wire-mesh stent in one artery.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
The Maryland Health Care Commission approved conditional, one-year extensions yesterday for six Baltimore-area hospitals to treat heart-attack patients with emergency angioplasties, a procedure using a tiny balloon to clear blocked blood vessels. The hospitals, whose programs for emergency angioplasties without surgical backup were under review for the first time, had been seeking two-year extensions. The six failed, for at least some of the time over the past two years, to meet some of the state standards for the program, including 24-hour operation and getting 80 percent of patients treated within two hours.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2006
Using angioplasty to unclog arteries more than 24 hours after a patient's heart attack does no good and may increase the chances of another attack, researchers said yesterday. The findings, which contradict a long-held belief that opening vessels to restore blood flow is always beneficial, could spare thousands of patients from undergoing the costly and potentially risky procedure. The report "is a sobering reminder that sometimes our preconceived notions turn out not to be accurate," said Dr. Prediman K. Shah, director of cardiology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, who was not involved in the research.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1992
Patients with a mild form of clogged arteries are twice as likely to die from bypass surgery as they are from angioplasty, in which a balloon is inflated inside the arteries to open them up, according to the first major study to compare the two procedures directly.The study appears to raise some serious questions about the use of bypass surgery in such low-risk patients, its authors said.They added that the difference in risk between the two procedures was probably even higher now because the study involved patients treated during 1985, when angioplasty was first being widely used.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 1993
Women who undergo angioplasty -- a common procedure in which a tiny balloon is used to reopen clogged arteries -- are 10 times more likely than men to die in the hospital, according to a study that may renew debate about a possible bias in the treatment of female heart patients.The study, which appears today in Circulation, a journal published by the American Heart Association, found that long-term survival rates for men and women angioplasty patients were about the same. Yet even after risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and old age were taken into account, women were still 4 1/2 times more likely to die in the hospital.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELS TIMES | May 2, 2007
Increased use of angioplasty and the introduction of new drugs over the past seven years have nearly halved the number of hospitalized heart attack victims who die or suffer severe heart failure, an international team of researchers reports today. The report showed "remarkable improvements" in the care of heart attack patients in all 14 countries studied, said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow of the University of California, Los Angeles' Geffen School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2006
Using angioplasty to unclog arteries more than 24 hours after a patient's heart attack does no good and may increase the chances of another attack, researchers said yesterday. The findings, which contradict a long-held belief that opening vessels to restore blood flow is always beneficial, could spare thousands of patients from undergoing the costly and potentially risky procedure. The report "is a sobering reminder that sometimes our preconceived notions turn out not to be accurate," said Dr. Prediman K. Shah, director of cardiology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, who was not involved in the research.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
The Maryland Health Care Commission approved conditional, one-year extensions yesterday for six Baltimore-area hospitals to treat heart-attack patients with emergency angioplasties, a procedure using a tiny balloon to clear blocked blood vessels. The hospitals, whose programs for emergency angioplasties without surgical backup were under review for the first time, had been seeking two-year extensions. The six failed, for at least some of the time over the past two years, to meet some of the state standards for the program, including 24-hour operation and getting 80 percent of patients treated within two hours.
NEWS
February 2, 2004
Howard hospital approved to perform urgent angioplasty The Institutional Review Board of Johns Hopkins Medicine granted approval last month to Howard County General Hospital to participate in Maryland's Cardiovascular Patient Outcomes Research Team project. The project is a research registry that allows immediate angioplasty treatment for patients experiencing certain types of heart attacks. The hospital's participation will permit heart attack victims who would otherwise have to be transported to another facility to receive emergency angioplasty at the Columbia hospital.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
A push toward allowing more Maryland hospitals to perform a profitable heart procedure triggered fierce arguments yesterday, with cardiologists and lawyers arguing over whether patient care would be helped or endangered. But bubbling below the surface - and at times breaking through - was a tussle over the millions of dollars in revenue that these procedures generate for hospitals. "We have been trying for more than 15 years to break into this club," Kenneth H. Bancroft, chief executive officer of St. Agnes HealthCare, told the Maryland Health Care Commission at a public hearing.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
The patient lies in St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson after being rushed there by ambulance. A heart test at another hospital revealed serious blockages in two arteries leading to his heart - "widow-makers," as some doctors refer to the condition. Dr. Mark Midei inserts a thin tube into the man's groin while looking at a television-like monitor - a window into the man's heart. The cardiologist threads the tube to the point of the blockage and inflates a tiny balloon at the tip. It expands a minuscule metal scaffolding called a stent, which holds open the artery and clears the blockage.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
The patient lies in St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson after being rushed there by ambulance. A heart test at another hospital revealed serious blockages in two arteries leading to his heart - "widow-makers," as some doctors refer to the condition. Dr. Mark Midei inserts a thin tube into the man's groin while looking at a television-like monitor - a window into the man's heart. The cardiologist threads the tube to the point of the blockage and inflates a tiny balloon at the tip. It expands a minuscule metal scaffolding called a stent, which holds open the artery and clears the blockage.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 13, 2000
NATICK, Mass. - Boston Scientific Corp. said yesterday that it will cut 1,000 jobs, or about 7.7 percent of its work force, and close plants to improve productivity and reduce costs amid increasing competition for its angioplasty products. The company will cease manufacturing in Plymouth, Minn.; Redmond, Wash.; and Watertown, Mass. Production from those plants, along with 900 jobs, will be transferred to facilities in Miami and in Ireland. The company said it will take a $45 million charge, or about 10 cents a share, against this year's earnings to pay for the changes.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
Rob Alford, veteran heart patient, became a pioneer last week when tiny tubes were threaded into his clogged arteries. Doctors believe the devices could transform cardiac medicine. On Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug-coated stent that keeps scar tissue from choking newly unclogged arteries. The next day, Alford, a 50-year-old Bel Air resident, became one of the first patients in the country outside a clinical trial to get the new treatment. "This is the hottest thing in cardiology in years," said Dr. Mark Midei, the St. Joseph Medical Center physician who treated Alford.
NEWS
March 21, 2003
Carroll Commissioner Dean L. Minnich will be on light duty for the next week while he recuperates from an angioplasty procedure, county officials said yesterday. During a routine physical and stress test, Minnich's doctor detected arterial blockage and ordered a catheterization. Minnich, 60, said he had been experiencing fatigue but had no other telling symptoms. Minnich underwent the procedure Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Surgeons corrected what was a 90 percent blockage with angioplasty and a wire-mesh stent in one artery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.