Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAngiography
IN THE NEWS

Angiography

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 30, 1991
Physicians at Carroll County General Hospital soon will have a new tool that will enable them to better detect and treat patients' heart and blood vessel disorders.Hospital officials say they hope the opening later this fall of the angiography and cardiac catheterizationlab will keep Carroll patients with cardiovascular problems from seeking treatment outside the county."We found that the No. 1 reason patients were leaving the county was to have these two procedures performed," said Linda Harder, CCGH vice president for marketing and planning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 21, 1992
It produces elegant pictures of slipped discs and brain tumors, reveals the inner structure of the eye and ear, captures torn ligaments and cartilage -- even displays the neurological decay of multiple sclerosis.Magnetic resonance imaging, a technique performed by cylindrical machines the size of pickup trucks, has revolutionized medical diagnosis ever since it first appeared in the medical marketplace a decade ago.The imagers, which have sprouted in dozens of hospitals and private clinics throughout Baltimore, have always done an excellent job producing high-resolution pictures of organs and tissues.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1990
High-tech medical treatment goes more often to private-pay patients than to people with public insurance or no insurance, according to a new study that found that how a person pays for his medical care may influence the kind of care he gets.The finding, to be published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, may seem self-evident but, in fact, undercuts what many believe is a basic tenet of medicine -- that a person's care is dictated simply by the state of his health."The finding is alarming because I think the health care system is assumed to be set up in such a way that medical decisions are made on the basis of ... the clinical characteristics of patients," said Joel Weissman, an instructor in health policy at Harvard Medical School and a co-author of the paper.
NEWS
May 13, 1992
Apartment plan OK'dWESTMINSTER -- The county Board of Zoning Appeals has given its OK to a Reisterstown developer to build 92 senior citizen apartments on Cranberry Road, just north of Cranberry Mall.The 6.8 acres was zoned for single-family homes on quarter-acre lots, but the zoning ordinance allows retirement homes with the zoning board's approval.John J. Schuster Jr. of Schuster Enterprises Inc. still must submit his plans to the county Planning Commission for approval before he may begin the project.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 21, 1992
It produces elegant pictures of slipped discs and brain tumors, reveals the inner structure of the eye and ear, captures torn ligaments and cartilage -- even displays the neurological decay of multiple sclerosis.Magnetic resonance imaging, a technique performed by cylindrical machines the size of pickup trucks, has revolutionized medical diagnosis ever since it first appeared in the medical marketplace a decade ago.The imagers, which have sprouted in dozens of hospitals and private clinics throughout Baltimore, have always done an excellent job producing high-resolution pictures of organs and tissues.
NEWS
May 13, 1992
Apartment plan OK'dWESTMINSTER -- The county Board of Zoning Appeals has given its OK to a Reisterstown developer to build 92 senior citizen apartments on Cranberry Road, just north of Cranberry Mall.The 6.8 acres was zoned for single-family homes on quarter-acre lots, but the zoning ordinance allows retirement homes with the zoning board's approval.John J. Schuster Jr. of Schuster Enterprises Inc. still must submit his plans to the county Planning Commission for approval before he may begin the project.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpen for Knight Ridder | April 17, 1991
Sports-Tech"The sports industry is a $63 billion market, which is growing approximately 15 percent a year. Sports-Tech (STXL, OTC, around $3) is engaged in the development and sale of advanced computer-aided video systems used by sports programs at the professional, collegiate and high school levels, says The Kon-Lin Letter of Rocky Point, N.Y."For fiscal year 1990, revenues increased 35 percent to $5 million, with net income vaulting 179 percent. . ."We continue to recommend purchase of this stock."
NEWS
September 8, 1991
The election of officers and members of the board for Carroll CountyHealth Services Inc. and its subsidiaries were conducted Monday evening during the company's quarterly meeting at Carroll County General Hospital.Carroll County Health Services Inc. is the parent company of CCGH, CCGH Foundation and Carroll County Med-Services.Parent company officers for fiscal year 1991-1992 are William Gavin, chairman; Steve Bohn, vice chairman; Steve Chapin, secretary, andEdwin Shauck, treasurer.Elected board members for the parent company are Charles O. Fisher, Steve Chapin, Edwin Shauck, Todd Brown, Harry Dougherty, Irvin Goodman, William Gavin and Randy Rager.
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 17, 1996
BOSTON -- Physicians have apparently ruled out a seizure or other neurological disorder as the cause of star center Marcus Camby's collapse Sunday, and they were concentrating on tests of his heart and blood vessels in search of some elusive cardiovascular problem.Team doctor Daniel Clapp said the tests might include invasive procedures, such as angiography or snipping a piece of his heart muscle."We're still without an answer that's medically honest," Clapp said.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun Reporter | February 23, 2008
Computed tomography angiography is booming. In 10 painless minutes, this noninvasive test provides a detailed, colorful three-dimensional view of a patient's heart. Many specialists say the CT procedure is more accurate and precise than other heart tests. Exact figures aren't available, but some experts think Americans undergo several hundred thousand CT angiographies a year, perhaps more than a million. "It's a very easy test to do," says Dr. Michael Lauer, a heart researcher at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 30, 1991
Physicians at Carroll County General Hospital soon will have a new tool that will enable them to better detect and treat patients' heart and blood vessel disorders.Hospital officials say they hope the opening later this fall of the angiography and cardiac catheterizationlab will keep Carroll patients with cardiovascular problems from seeking treatment outside the county."We found that the No. 1 reason patients were leaving the county was to have these two procedures performed," said Linda Harder, CCGH vice president for marketing and planning.
NEWS
September 8, 1991
The election of officers and members of the board for Carroll CountyHealth Services Inc. and its subsidiaries were conducted Monday evening during the company's quarterly meeting at Carroll County General Hospital.Carroll County Health Services Inc. is the parent company of CCGH, CCGH Foundation and Carroll County Med-Services.Parent company officers for fiscal year 1991-1992 are William Gavin, chairman; Steve Bohn, vice chairman; Steve Chapin, secretary, andEdwin Shauck, treasurer.Elected board members for the parent company are Charles O. Fisher, Steve Chapin, Edwin Shauck, Todd Brown, Harry Dougherty, Irvin Goodman, William Gavin and Randy Rager.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpen for Knight Ridder | April 17, 1991
Sports-Tech"The sports industry is a $63 billion market, which is growing approximately 15 percent a year. Sports-Tech (STXL, OTC, around $3) is engaged in the development and sale of advanced computer-aided video systems used by sports programs at the professional, collegiate and high school levels, says The Kon-Lin Letter of Rocky Point, N.Y."For fiscal year 1990, revenues increased 35 percent to $5 million, with net income vaulting 179 percent. . ."We continue to recommend purchase of this stock."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1990
High-tech medical treatment goes more often to private-pay patients than to people with public insurance or no insurance, according to a new study that found that how a person pays for his medical care may influence the kind of care he gets.The finding, to be published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, may seem self-evident but, in fact, undercuts what many believe is a basic tenet of medicine -- that a person's care is dictated simply by the state of his health."The finding is alarming because I think the health care system is assumed to be set up in such a way that medical decisions are made on the basis of ... the clinical characteristics of patients," said Joel Weissman, an instructor in health policy at Harvard Medical School and a co-author of the paper.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Regardless of whether Dr. Mark Midei and others may have performed inappropriate stent procedures, the state and Maryland hospitals have not yet agreed to require mandatory accreditation of cardiac cath labs and outside peer review. These were strong recommendations by the American College of Cardiology and the Society for Angiography and Interventions. One year after an investigation by the Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) was requested, the results are yet to be announced to the public, raising the issue of whether HSCRC is capable of compiling reliable clinical data.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | June 14, 1994
Q: After having a heart attack five months ago, I stopped smoking and started on a diet and exercise program to lose weight and control my cholesterol level. My doctor seems satisfied with my cholesterol of 220, but I wonder if it should be lower.A: A cholesterol of 220 mg/dl is too high for anyone who has had a heart attack or any other evidence of coronary artery disease, such as angina or a history of bypass surgery or angioplasty to open a blocked coronary artery. This opinion is based on several types of information.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.