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By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti says he was not "removed" or "ousted" as judge of the city's felony arraignment court, but transferred out of the position voluntarily to reduce his workload.Administrative Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan said last week that Angeletti was being replaced by Judge Kenneth Lavon Johnson after the percentage of plea bargains negotiated in arraignment court in September was the lowest in nearly a decade."That was the straw that broke the camel's back," said Kaplan, who noted that he suggested the move.
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NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
A retired Baltimore judge who was criticized for considering a job offer from lawyer Peter G. Angelos while presiding over asbestos cases handled by his firm is now on Angelos' payroll. Judge Edward J. Angeletti, who presided over asbestos-related cases for a decade, joined Angelos' firm March 5 to oversee its personal injury and malpractice units, Angelos said yesterday. Angeletti was offered the job in January when he was sitting as a retired judge in city Circuit Court, said the court's administrative judge.
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | November 2, 1990
Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti has been removed as head of the city's felony arraignment court because his reluctance to negotiate plea bargains has created "wasteful" and unnecessary work for the court, according to administrative Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, who made the decision.Judge Angeletti, who was out of town yesterday and unavailable for comment, will be replaced Monday as head of felony arraignments by Judge Kenneth Lavon Johnson. Baltimore Circuit Court handles about 5,000 felony cases a year.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 31, 2000
IN THE last public address before his assassination, Abraham Lincoln left us with the admonition that "important principles may and must be inflexible." And so it was disturbing that a panel of Baltimore Circuit Court judges applied a no harm/no foul standard in ruling that five groups of asbestos injury trials should proceed despite one of the specially assigned judges having received an offer of employment with the law firm representing the plaintiffs. There may have been, as the panel found, no prejudice to the defendants, and the proceedings may have been entirely unaffected.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
A retired Baltimore judge who was criticized for considering a job offer from lawyer Peter G. Angelos while presiding over asbestos cases handled by his firm is now on Angelos' payroll. Judge Edward J. Angeletti, who presided over asbestos-related cases for a decade, joined Angelos' firm March 5 to oversee its personal injury and malpractice units, Angelos said yesterday. Angeletti was offered the job in January when he was sitting as a retired judge in city Circuit Court, said the court's administrative judge.
NEWS
August 2, 2000
BALANCE has been restored to the scales of justice in an asbestos-injury case. Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti finally recognized he'd compromised his ability to oversee this trial because he discussed a job offer with plaintiff's attorney Peter G. Angelos. Why it took Judge Angeletti so long to recuse himself is mystifying. Mr. Angelos' effort to hire the judge, who retired last year after 19 years of exemplary work on the circuit court, clearly tainted the jurist's ability to preside over a suit brought by the Angelos office.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
A Baltimore judge who received a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos brought an asbestos injury trial to an abrupt end yesterday when he reversed his own rulings and removed himself from the case. In announcing his startling reversal, Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti said that his "impartiality has been brought into question." He had denied two previous motions by defendant ACandS Inc. for his disqualification and a motion for mistrial because of the Angelos offer. Angeletti's decision came as the three-week trial involving 13 workers allegedly hurt by exposure to asbestos was about to go to the jury.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Citing an "appearance of impropriety," defense lawyers filed motions for mistrial yesterday in five asbestos injury trials because of a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos to Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti. In the motions, lawyers for ACandS Inc. said they were seeking mistrials in all of the asbestos trials that began July 10, not just the one before Angeletti, because the judge made pretrial rulings affecting all the proceedings. The motions criticized Angeletti for not disclosing the Angelos offer until after the trials had begun.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
A pedophile who mailed child pornography to a Baltimore County teen before the teen, his brother and his father committed suicide could, if convicted, receive another three years behind bars on top of the 10-year term he is already serving, court records show.A Baltimore judge has issued an arrest warrant for Peter Dudley Albertsen II, 35, ordering him to return from federal prison in North Carolina to face charges that he violated his probation in the years after he pleaded guilty in 1990 to sexually molesting Justin Wilke.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
Claiming the "likelihood" that a Baltimore judge discussed working for plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos far earlier than he has acknowledged, defense lawyers in a $2.1 million asbestos case have asked a state appeals court to order a hearing on the job offer. Lawyers for John Crane Inc. want the Court of Special Appeals to halt the company's appeal of last year's jury verdict and send the case back to Baltimore Circuit Court for a hearing to gain more information about job talks between Angelos and Judge Edward J. Angeletti.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2000
In the past month, Baltimore judges and lawyers have plowed through roughly 400 asbestos-injury cases that have languished for more than a decade - starting to clear out an enormous backlog, but spurring concerns of fairness from defense attorneys. Nearly 350 of the Circuit Court cases have been settled out of court. Thirty-five cases have been decided by juries. Other cases have been dismissed or postponed in the first major group of cases set for trial. A jury deciding 26 of the cases will resume deliberating Monday.
NEWS
August 2, 2000
BALANCE has been restored to the scales of justice in an asbestos-injury case. Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti finally recognized he'd compromised his ability to oversee this trial because he discussed a job offer with plaintiff's attorney Peter G. Angelos. Why it took Judge Angeletti so long to recuse himself is mystifying. Mr. Angelos' effort to hire the judge, who retired last year after 19 years of exemplary work on the circuit court, clearly tainted the jurist's ability to preside over a suit brought by the Angelos office.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
A Baltimore judge who received a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos brought an asbestos injury trial to an abrupt end yesterday when he reversed his own rulings and removed himself from the case. In announcing his startling reversal, Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti said that his "impartiality has been brought into question." He had denied two previous motions by defendant ACandS Inc. for his disqualification and a motion for mistrial because of the Angelos offer. Angeletti's decision came as the three-week trial involving 13 workers allegedly hurt by exposure to asbestos was about to go to the jury.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
Claiming the "likelihood" that a Baltimore judge discussed working for plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos far earlier than he has acknowledged, defense lawyers in a $2.1 million asbestos case have asked a state appeals court to order a hearing on the job offer. Lawyers for John Crane Inc. want the Court of Special Appeals to halt the company's appeal of last year's jury verdict and send the case back to Baltimore Circuit Court for a hearing to gain more information about job talks between Angelos and Judge Edward J. Angeletti.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
Four Baltimore circuit judges criticized a fellow judge yesterday for his "belated disclosure" of a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos shortly before he was to begin presiding over an asbestos injury trial. But the four judges - each presiding over an asbestos jury trial and sitting together as an ad hoc panel - denied motions for mistrial by defendant ACandS Inc. arising from Angelos' offer to Judge Edward J. Angeletti. "This panel has concluded that there were errors in judgment in these cases by both plaintiffs' counsel and the judge," Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller said in announcing the ruling.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Citing an "appearance of impropriety," defense lawyers filed motions for mistrial yesterday in five asbestos injury trials because of a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos to Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti. In the motions, lawyers for ACandS Inc. said they were seeking mistrials in all of the asbestos trials that began July 10, not just the one before Angeletti, because the judge made pretrial rulings affecting all the proceedings. The motions criticized Angeletti for not disclosing the Angelos offer until after the trials had begun.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
Four Baltimore circuit judges criticized a fellow judge yesterday for his "belated disclosure" of a job offer from plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos shortly before he was to begin presiding over an asbestos injury trial. But the four judges - each presiding over an asbestos jury trial and sitting together as an ad hoc panel - denied motions for mistrial by defendant ACandS Inc. arising from Angelos' offer to Judge Edward J. Angeletti. "This panel has concluded that there were errors in judgment in these cases by both plaintiffs' counsel and the judge," Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller said in announcing the ruling.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
Amid criticism that plea bargains have hit an all-time low, Baltimore Circuit Judge Edward J. Angeletti has been replaced as head of the felony arraignment court.Administrative Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan yesterday confirmed that Angeletti would no longer handle felony arraignments.Judge Kenneth Lavon Johnson will take over the arraignment court when Angeletti returns from vacation Wednesday, Kaplan said.Angeletti, 53, will continue to supervise the court's felony docket and he will serve as a trial judge and handle Johnson's docket, Kaplan added.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
A retired Baltimore Circuit Court judge assigned to hear a backlog of asbestos-injury lawsuits was offered a job by plaintiffs' attorney Peter G. Angelos less than three weeks before the trials began. Angelos' offer to Judge Edward J. Angeletti - first disclosed in court July 12 and brought up again yesterday - prompted a request last week by defendant ACandS Inc. that Angeletti remove himself from presiding over a jury trial involving several plaintiffs represented by Angelos' firm. Angeletti, who said the Angelos offer was withdrawn a week after it was made, denied the request.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 8, 1999
"If we call a cow's tail a leg," President Abraham Lincoln once asked members of his Cabinet, "how many legs would a cow have?""Five," the cognitively challenged Cabinet members answered."A cow only has four legs," our nation's most sagacious chief executive reminded his advisers, "no matter what we call its tail."A child is still a child, Honest Abe would probably remind us in 1999, no matter how the state of Michigan tries to make him an adult.Several weeks ago, 13-year-old Nathaniel Abraham was tried as an adult and found guilty of second-degree murder for fatally shooting a man when he was 11. After the conviction, there was much crowing and bragging among conservatives about how Michigan had gotten tough with a 13-year-old.
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