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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 3, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton waded into the seas of racial politics yesterday with an appeal to blacks and whites to accept responsibility for racial divisions and to take action to cure them.Borrowing Thomas Jefferson's warning about slavery to call the Los Angeles riots a "fire bell in the night," Mr. Clinton said that Americans "must face our fears and stop running from them. There is no place to hide."In an emotional speech to the Democratic Leadership Council, the Arkansas governor criticized both Republican neglect and Democratic unwillingness to face "the hard truth" about urban violence.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 29, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- The task of selecting an anonymous jury in the Reginald Denny beating trial began slowly in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom as demonstrators carrying placards reading "No Justice, No Peace" paced outside.Thirty-nine potential jurors, pulled yesterday from the first day's pool of 118, were asked to fill out a written questionnaire quizzing them about their knowledge of the case, the Rodney King trial acquittals and the Los Angeles riots they sparked.Jury selection was to resume to day with a second pool of jurors.
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SPORTS
February 12, 1993
College footballUCLA coach Terry Donahue says he believes he was hampered in efforts to recruit top players because of the Los Angeles riots last spring.From the class that signed with UCLA last week, only two of 17 players were from outside California -- both from Texas.During the previous 10 years, UCLA landed 38 percent of its players from other states."There's no question that the L.A. riots -- or the view of Los Angeles on a nationwide basis -- caused concern," Donahue said of players he recruited in an interview with the Los Angeles Daily News.
SPORTS
February 12, 1993
College footballUCLA coach Terry Donahue says he believes he was hampered in efforts to recruit top players because of the Los Angeles riots last spring.From the class that signed with UCLA last week, only two of 17 players were from outside California -- both from Texas.During the previous 10 years, UCLA landed 38 percent of its players from other states."There's no question that the L.A. riots -- or the view of Los Angeles on a nationwide basis -- caused concern," Donahue said of players he recruited in an interview with the Los Angeles Daily News.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1992
Vice President Dan Quayle is blaming the Los Angeles riots on a breakdown of American family values and says prime-time television contributed to the moral decay by heroizing a character who bore a baby out of wedlock.In a stern admonition on behalf of traditional mores, Mr. Quayle said that the "lawless social anarchy" that erupted in Los Angeles emerged from a broader breakdown that has fostered a "poverty of values."He said that the plight of urban America has not been helped by the portrayal this week on TV's "Murphy Brown" of the title character "mocking the importance of fathers by bearing a child alone, and calling it just another 'lifestyle choice.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 29, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- The task of selecting an anonymous jury in the Reginald Denny beating trial began slowly in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom as demonstrators carrying placards reading "No Justice, No Peace" paced outside.Thirty-nine potential jurors, pulled yesterday from the first day's pool of 118, were asked to fill out a written questionnaire quizzing them about their knowledge of the case, the Rodney King trial acquittals and the Los Angeles riots they sparked.Jury selection was to resume to day with a second pool of jurors.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | May 19, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Now that all four active presidential candidates -- Democrats Bill Clinton and Jerry Brown and Republicans George Bush and Patrick Buchanan -- have paid their mandatory visits to the sites of the Los Angeles riots, the question is: How will the tragedy affect the approaching June 2 California primary?The answer, somewhat surprisingly, is probably not in any substantial way. The reason, on the Democratic side, is that there is little basic difference between Clinton and Brown on what the Democratic response should be: more federal aid to urban America, both short- and long-term.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | June 28, 1992
Being an ordinary citizen, you are, no offense, way too stupid to understand the complex problems involved in trying to balance the federal budget. This is why you are very fortunate that you have the U.S. Congress gnawing away on the deficit problem for you, like a colony of busy beavers who have somehow obtained suits, ties and checking accounts.The federal deficit is creating a monstrous, crushing burden of debt that will be placed on the shoulders of future generations. This has a certain appeal.
NEWS
May 18, 1992
It certainly would seem that way. One calamity after another has hit the Golden State. Earthquakes. Firestorms. Prolonged drought. Intense smog. Unreal traffic gridlock. Recession. And now massive urban rioting. California seems to be under a perpetual state of siege.Yet for millions, California remains the land of opportunity. A vast tidal wave of Asian and Latino immigrants has swelled the population to 30 million, with another 650,000 people arriving each year. They are placing a strain on a state government already on the verge of breakdown.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- After a month of hard-nosed bargaining and political posturing, White House and congressional negotiators agreed yesterday on a $1.3 billion urban aid package including loans and grants for summer jobs for youths and disaster relief for people whose homes and businesses were destroyed in the Los Angeles riots.The compromise fell far short of what the nation's big-city mayors and some Democratic lawmakers were seeking, and it excluded law-enforcement and investment programs that President Bush wanted passed quickly in the aftermath of the riots.
NEWS
By The Christian Science Monitor | February 1, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- In the Dodger Stadium parking lot here, three speeding police cars screech to a halt beside a bandage-wrapped dummy. The cars disgorge six gun-wielding officers who retrieve the dummy, then exit, sirens blaring.With preparations such as these new victim-rescue exercises by the Los Angeles Police Department, this city is bracing itself for its biggest test of community, police and race relations since the Los Angeles riots last spring.That test is scheduled to start Wednesday with the federal civil trial of four white officers accused in the beating of black motorist Rodney King on March 3, 1991.
NEWS
By Bob Sipchen and Bob Sipchen,Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Wherever he goes, people wonder if he is really the man they saw dragged from his truck April 29 and beaten so severely that few thought he would live."
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 31, 1992
Does anyone remember the spate of angry columns that appeared last summer denouncing Bill Clinton for criticizing Sister Souljah -- and, by implication, Jesse Jackson, who had invited her to speak at his Rainbow Coalition convention?The writers said Mr. Clinton's criticism of Ms. Souljah's remarks after the Los Angeles riots -- she suggested black people ought to kill white people instead of each other -- was actually a coded racial appeal to white Reagan Democrats. Some writers went on to express the hope that black voters would punish Mr. Clinton by staying away from the polls in November.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 28, 1992
Ladies and gentlemen, coming to your living room this fall . . . the Los Angeles Riots!Television viewers will soon be treated to a heaping dose of turmoil on the tube, courtesy of several veteran drama and comedy shows that will be using the unrest in Los Angeles as a backdrop for their fictional characters.In addition to NBC's "A Different World," which has completed a two-part episode re-creating the riots, plot lines dealing with the unrest and the aftermath will be featured in early season episodes of ABC's "Doogie Howser, M.D," NBC's "Fresh Prince of Bel Air" and "L.A.
NEWS
By DANA H. ALLIN | July 12, 1992
America's isolation at the Rio "Earth summit" was all right with George Bush, who figures that "leadership sometimes requires standing alone." But one wonders whether the Bush administration has any clear idea of what the future basis for American leadership should be.Military power remains, but its devaluation is as inevitable as it is welcome. Economic power will be difficult to project, given our budget deficits and borrowing needs. And the Los Angeles riots underscored another handicap: the diminishing power of the American example.
NEWS
By Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler and Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler,Los Angeles Times | July 6, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- In years to come, when historians examine the roots of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, they will be led not to the city's most desperate housing projects, but to neighborhoods of manicured lawns, weekend barbecues and unbarred windows.And when they sift through police records for the first documented act of violence, they will find not the armed hand of a gangster or gang member, but the raised fist of a 19-year-old store clerk who was so enraged at the Rodney King verdict that he uncharacteristically hurled a rock at a white motorist.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | May 27, 1992
THE SILLINESS of Vice President Dan Quayle's recent remarks holding television shows responsible for the riots in Los Angeles ("I wish the media were here in the streets with me today," said that old habitue of the streets. "They ought to come to the real world and find out about the future.") should not blind us to their political importance.David Gergen, of the "MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour," surmised that one consequence of the Los Angeles riots would probably be that the Republicans would forgo playing "the race card" in this year's election, and I found myself agreeing.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau Staff writer Michael Fletcher contributed to this article | May 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- What binds the Roman Catholic nun walking the hot road from Baltimore to Washington, the former editor of Newsweek, homeless Tucsonites from Arizona and disabled children riding down from New York City?They all plan to march in Washington tomorrow to press for more federal spending to revitalize America's crumbling inner cities -- a cause that has taken on greater urgency in the wake of the verdict in the Rodney King beating case and the Los Angeles riots that followed.A similar march last fall, organized by Baltimore activists, drew only 3,000 people when it was held the same weekend that Anita Hill confronted Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas with her charges of sexual harassment.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | June 28, 1992
Being an ordinary citizen, you are, no offense, way too stupid to understand the complex problems involved in trying to balance the federal budget. This is why you are very fortunate that you have the U.S. Congress gnawing away on the deficit problem for you, like a colony of busy beavers who have somehow obtained suits, ties and checking accounts.The federal deficit is creating a monstrous, crushing burden of debt that will be placed on the shoulders of future generations. This has a certain appeal.
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