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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
In Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section, the phone number to call for information about Angela Davis' lecture on Dec. 3 at Center Stage was incorrectly listed. The correct number is (410) 332-0033.The Sun regrets the error.Former student activist Angela Davis will lecture to college students at 5 p.m. Saturday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Presented by the theater's "Theater for a New Generation" in conjunction with the current production of August Wilson's "Two Trains Running," the program is free to Center Stage student pass holders and $5 for the general public.
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By JANNETTE J. WITMYER and JANNETTE J. WITMYER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
A lot of people would be surprised to learn that the smartly coifed hairdo that they have been admiring on a friend or family member's head is actually a wig. For the girl down the block or the corporate executive, these hair pieces have become an essential part of achieving a specific look. Admittedly, there's the star-look-alike factor. So you want to look like Whitney Houston? Then throw on a gently tousled shock of curly locks. Or maybe you want to unleash the Beyonce in you. You will need a wig of long, flowing, blond-blended hair.
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NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
Angela Davis is not remembered for trying to free the Soledad Brothers, for making the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List, for sparking a worldwide "Free Angela Davis" campaign. She is remembered for her Afro hairstyle, and she doesn't like it one bit.That's what Ms. Davis told a standing-room only crowd of 575 people last night at Center Stage's "Theater for a New Generation" program, which was designed for young adults who recognize Ms. Davis only because her funky 'fro has come back into style.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2002
CHICAGO - Inside the 7,000-square-foot office of a renovated warehouse on south Michigan Avenue, it is almost as if the walls can talk. Boxes of labeled videotapes neatly line shelves where the tales of a century and a people are stored. Some of the stories are familiar, some not so familiar. And some of those telling their stories are famous - Harry Belafonte, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Terry McMillan and Julian Bond - though many are not so famous. But all are deemed to be history makers, their voices and faces captured on tape as lessons for generations to come.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 5, 1994
I went to see Angela Davis, the symbol of revolutionary chic, the other night.Angela used to be very, very cool. She had that great Afro and the Letterman-like gap between her front teeth.And she wasn't just some UCLA professor that Ronald Reagan, then governor of California, got fired because she was a Communist and read too much Marcuse. She actually got mixed up with jail-house revolutionaries/convicted criminals and made the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List.That was, as we used to say late at night in dorm-room bull sessions, very heavy.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
Clyde Tombaugh, 90, the astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto before he had a college degree, died Friday at his home in Mesilla Park, N.M. He retired in 1973 as an astronomy professor at New Mexico State University, where he founded the research astronomy department.Tombaugh discovered Pluto, the ninth planet from the sun, in 1930 when he was 24.Theo Wilson, a journalist whose courtroom coverage of cases from Sam Sheppard to John DeLorean made her the dean of America's trial reporters, died in Los Angeles early Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage.
NEWS
By JANNETTE J. WITMYER and JANNETTE J. WITMYER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
A lot of people would be surprised to learn that the smartly coifed hairdo that they have been admiring on a friend or family member's head is actually a wig. For the girl down the block or the corporate executive, these hair pieces have become an essential part of achieving a specific look. Admittedly, there's the star-look-alike factor. So you want to look like Whitney Houston? Then throw on a gently tousled shock of curly locks. Or maybe you want to unleash the Beyonce in you. You will need a wig of long, flowing, blond-blended hair.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2002
CHICAGO - Inside the 7,000-square-foot office of a renovated warehouse on south Michigan Avenue, it is almost as if the walls can talk. Boxes of labeled videotapes neatly line shelves where the tales of a century and a people are stored. Some of the stories are familiar, some not so familiar. And some of those telling their stories are famous - Harry Belafonte, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Terry McMillan and Julian Bond - though many are not so famous. But all are deemed to be history makers, their voices and faces captured on tape as lessons for generations to come.
NEWS
July 22, 2008
On July 16, 2008, ANGELA DAVIS-BUNN. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS
NEWS
November 30, 1994
In Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section, the phone number to call for information about Angela Davis' lecture on Dec. 3 at Center Stage was incorrectly listed. The correct number is (410) 332-0033.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
Clyde Tombaugh, 90, the astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto before he had a college degree, died Friday at his home in Mesilla Park, N.M. He retired in 1973 as an astronomy professor at New Mexico State University, where he founded the research astronomy department.Tombaugh discovered Pluto, the ninth planet from the sun, in 1930 when he was 24.Theo Wilson, a journalist whose courtroom coverage of cases from Sam Sheppard to John DeLorean made her the dean of America's trial reporters, died in Los Angeles early Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 5, 1994
I went to see Angela Davis, the symbol of revolutionary chic, the other night.Angela used to be very, very cool. She had that great Afro and the Letterman-like gap between her front teeth.And she wasn't just some UCLA professor that Ronald Reagan, then governor of California, got fired because she was a Communist and read too much Marcuse. She actually got mixed up with jail-house revolutionaries/convicted criminals and made the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List.That was, as we used to say late at night in dorm-room bull sessions, very heavy.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
Angela Davis is not remembered for trying to free the Soledad Brothers, for making the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List, for sparking a worldwide "Free Angela Davis" campaign. She is remembered for her Afro hairstyle, and she doesn't like it one bit.That's what Ms. Davis told a standing-room only crowd of 575 people last night at Center Stage's "Theater for a New Generation" program, which was designed for young adults who recognize Ms. Davis only because her funky 'fro has come back into style.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
In Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section, the phone number to call for information about Angela Davis' lecture on Dec. 3 at Center Stage was incorrectly listed. The correct number is (410) 332-0033.The Sun regrets the error.Former student activist Angela Davis will lecture to college students at 5 p.m. Saturday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Presented by the theater's "Theater for a New Generation" in conjunction with the current production of August Wilson's "Two Trains Running," the program is free to Center Stage student pass holders and $5 for the general public.
NEWS
November 16, 2003
On November 13, 2003, ROSALIEJOHNSON; beloved mother of Betty Charles, Sheila Ricks, Renee Mason, Christine Johnson (deceased), Maxine Herring, Jeana Lee, Laura Johnson and Angela Davis. She is also survived by a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at the DERRICK C. JONES FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 4611 Park Heights Avenue, on Tuesday, November 18, 2003, from 1 to 7 P.M. Family will receive friends on Wednesday, November 19, at 11:30 A.M., with funeral service to follow at 12 noon.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
A 28-year-old woman pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder in a domestic stabbing that occurred in June in Southwest Baltimore. Circuit Judge Martin P. Welch sentenced Angela Davis of the 1600 block of E. 29th St. to 30 years in prison, with all but 13 years suspended. On June 21, after arguing with Anthony Rheubottom, 25, Davis went into a house in the 2200 block of Christian St., grabbed a knife and stabbed him once in the chest. Rheubottom, Davis' longtime boyfriend and the father of her son, died later that day at Bon Secours Hospital.
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