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By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
A new event designed to generate investments by wealthy individuals in start-up companies is the most recent example of efforts to turn the tide on Maryland's shortage of investment capital for young firms. The Angels and Eggs investor forum is still in the planning stages. But organizers are modeling it after Mid-Atlantic Venture Association events in which nervous executives from later-stage companies are sent, one after the other, into rooms full of venture capitalists to make a short pitch for money.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | November 28, 2012
More than three years ago, I was just a newly minted tech reporter at the Baltimore Sun when I met Bill Anderson, who demo'ed some software and hardware that blew my mind. At the time, in the spring of 2009, Anderson was still prototyping his Chameleon software but already it could work magic. He could use software to direct a computer to identify a user's eye gaze, and scramble the screen for anyone else who tried to steal a look. I wrote about Bill's efforts here , and blogged about it here . A video we produced at the Sun actually went viral on all the tech blogs, including Gizmodo, which featured it . (The video was watched nearly 100,000 times and was the most successful online video I ever produced.)
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | November 28, 2012
More than three years ago, I was just a newly minted tech reporter at the Baltimore Sun when I met Bill Anderson, who demo'ed some software and hardware that blew my mind. At the time, in the spring of 2009, Anderson was still prototyping his Chameleon software but already it could work magic. He could use software to direct a computer to identify a user's eye gaze, and scramble the screen for anyone else who tried to steal a look. I wrote about Bill's efforts here , and blogged about it here . A video we produced at the Sun actually went viral on all the tech blogs, including Gizmodo, which featured it . (The video was watched nearly 100,000 times and was the most successful online video I ever produced.)
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 10, 2012
Woofound found something, alright: cash. The Baltimore County tech startup said today it raised $1 million in its latest round of funding. The investment came from unnamed private investors, and a $75,000 injection from Maryland TEDCO, a quasi-state agency that invests seed money in tech startups. Woofound's first product is a free iPhone app "that uses a signature visual personality game to match people to places and things to do based on their personality and preferences.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 10, 2012
Woofound found something, alright: cash. The Baltimore County tech startup said today it raised $1 million in its latest round of funding. The investment came from unnamed private investors, and a $75,000 injection from Maryland TEDCO, a quasi-state agency that invests seed money in tech startups. Woofound's first product is a free iPhone app "that uses a signature visual personality game to match people to places and things to do based on their personality and preferences.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
A Baltimore charitable foundation is joining Maryland's main technology development agency to create a $3.3 million investment fund to pump money into new tech startups in the city, officials plan to announce Tuesday. The Abell Foundation is investing $3 million into the newly created Propel Baltimore Fund, with another $300,000 coming from the Maryland Technology Development Corp., a quasi-state agency. The fund will make small, otherwise known as "angel," investments, typically ranging from $50,000 to $100,000, but up to a maximum of $220,000 per company.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2001
The first angel investment group in Howard County has gathered enough members to get down to the business of writing checks to companies around the region that could use some money to get off the ground. Founding partners Richard Kohr and Steve Dubin began organizing the Chesapeake Emerging Opportunities Club about a year ago because they both often work with fledgling companies that need angel investors. Kohr is president of Evergreen Capital, which handles mergers and acquisitions and provides accounting and financial consulting to small businesses.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 30, 2012
Chalk this up as another wacky use of Pinterest : Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley is promoting a contest on the hot website where Maryland entrepreneurs can pitch their startups by pinning 10 images to the governor's board . No kidding. There's been a ton of chatter this year in Maryland about supporting tech startups. The state raised $84 million from tax credit sales that will be used to fund early stage startups . And today, at the University of Maryland College Park, the Startup America initiative for Maryland is kicking off. There are all sorts of websites out there for entrepreneurs to pitch their startups.
NEWS
January 6, 2003
Investment club gets county award for development efforts Richard A. Kohr Jr., a managing member of the Chesapeake Emerging Opportunities Club, announced that the club received a 2002 Economic Development Achievement Award from the Howard County Economic Development Authority. Kohr, a partner in the Columbia accounting firm McLean, Koehler, Sparks & Hammond, and president of Evergreen Capital LLC, an investment bank, co-founded the club in 2001 with Steve Dubin, president of American Technology Investments Corp.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | August 10, 2008
For many small businesses, bank loans, venture capital and money from angel investors are financing long shots at best. It is far more common for a small business to secure funds from family members or even friends. Availability is the big draw. The downside is that business loans from family and friends also can be a disaster if they are not handled properly. Unstructured or loosely structured financing and pay back terms can haunt both sides in the future. Research shows that 14 percent of business loans from family and friends go into default, compared with about 1 percent for bank loans.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 30, 2012
Chalk this up as another wacky use of Pinterest : Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley is promoting a contest on the hot website where Maryland entrepreneurs can pitch their startups by pinning 10 images to the governor's board . No kidding. There's been a ton of chatter this year in Maryland about supporting tech startups. The state raised $84 million from tax credit sales that will be used to fund early stage startups . And today, at the University of Maryland College Park, the Startup America initiative for Maryland is kicking off. There are all sorts of websites out there for entrepreneurs to pitch their startups.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
A Baltimore charitable foundation is joining Maryland's main technology development agency to create a $3.3 million investment fund to pump money into new tech startups in the city, officials plan to announce Tuesday. The Abell Foundation is investing $3 million into the newly created Propel Baltimore Fund, with another $300,000 coming from the Maryland Technology Development Corp., a quasi-state agency. The fund will make small, otherwise known as "angel," investments, typically ranging from $50,000 to $100,000, but up to a maximum of $220,000 per company.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
A new event designed to generate investments by wealthy individuals in start-up companies is the most recent example of efforts to turn the tide on Maryland's shortage of investment capital for young firms. The Angels and Eggs investor forum is still in the planning stages. But organizers are modeling it after Mid-Atlantic Venture Association events in which nervous executives from later-stage companies are sent, one after the other, into rooms full of venture capitalists to make a short pitch for money.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2001
The first angel investment group in Howard County has gathered enough members to get down to the business of writing checks to companies around the region that could use some money to get off the ground. Founding partners Richard Kohr and Steve Dubin began organizing the Chesapeake Emerging Opportunities Club about a year ago because they both often work with fledgling companies that need angel investors. Kohr is president of Evergreen Capital, which handles mergers and acquisitions and provides accounting and financial consulting to small businesses.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
You have a great business idea. And your well-crafted plan is ready to go. Now comes the even harder part: Finding money. Or, rather, securing the right type of financing. It can be a daunting task. The U.S. Small Business Administration says "inadequate and ill-timed financing is a close second" among the most frequently given reasons why businesses fail. (Poor management is No. 1.) But seed money is out there in many forms if you know where to look. And even if you find a source or two, there are big decisions to make.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III | September 30, 2001
The terrorists savaged the plans of York, Pa., startup Livewire International Inc. on Sept. 11. The company was expecting the first installment of a $1 million investment that morning, but it never came and probably never will. The company that promised the money was nearly destroyed. "I feel like the rug was pulled right out from underneath my world," said J. Bruce Pavesich, a Glen Arm man who became Livewire's president in April. Livewire had spent about $2 million developing e-commerce "kiosks" that people could use to research resorts, make travel reservations, buy ski-lift tickets and purchase leisure equipment.
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