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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | April 7, 1992
Q: When a person has a small aneurysm of the abdominal lTC aorta, is it necessary to have a CAT scan every six months if the aneurysm has not grown? Our internist and heart specialist disagree on how frequently these scans must be done. Is there any unnecessary danger from regular scans?A: CAT scans can be used to track the course of an abdominal aneurysm. However, sonography (ultrasound) is the method generally recommended to follow such aneurysms because CAT scans are more costly and time-consuming.
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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 13, 2013
Margo Bates was new to the Guilford neighborhood when she first met Beverly Quinones in 1995. “She said, 'Would you like to do Flower Mart?' I said, 'What's Flower Mart?'” Quinones, longtime organizer of the Baltimore Flower Mart and the Guilford Holiday Party, former president of the Women's Civic League and a well-remembered columnist for the Baltimore Messenger, died of an aneurysm July 9, her family said. She had been in ill health for several years. Her age was not disclosed.
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By Mary Knudson | November 8, 1991
Looking back, Norman's parents think the headaches were the first clues that something was wrong.Norman Robinson Jr. was 10 then, living with his sister and parents in Upper Marlboro. The headaches were never severe, but sometimes bad enough to send him home from school. They continued for four years.Then two months ago, he started shaking all over, felt very cold and developed a high fever. Mr. Robinson took his son to a nearby hospital, which referred him to Bethesda Naval Hospital.Brain scans and other diagnostic tests revealed a large aneurysm, a ballooned-out blood vessel that was so large the Bethesda doctors scouted around for a surgeon skilled enough to remove it.When the doctors told Williemae Robinson, Norman's mother, his diagnosis, she fainted away.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
David Mills, a two-time Emmy winner and writer on the Baltimore-set TV series "Homicide: Life On the Street" and "The Wire," died yesterday in New Orleans, the New Orleans Time-Picayune is reporting. Mills, a former newspaper feature writer, was in New Orleans as a writer and co-executive producer of "Treme," a new HBO series set to debut next month. All three series have highlighted the work of Maryland native David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter. Mills' collapsed on the set of "Treme" Tuesday afternoon, according to a report on investigativevoice.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
A University of Maryland employee sued Blue Cross and Blu Shield of Maryland and the state for $20 million Tuesday, charging that Blue Cross refused to pay for a medical test that could have diagnosed a brain aneurysm before it ruptured.The woman, Nancy E. Biddison, who is in her 30s and an office worker in the animal sciences department at the University of Maryland College Park, suffered a stroke when the aneurysm burst on March 6, 1991. She lost vision in her right eye and movement in her left arm and leg, and walks only with the aid of a brace and a cane, according to the lawsuit and her lawyer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
Tiny platinum coils inserted into ruptured brain aneurysms are more effective in many cases than surgery in preventing disability and death, according to a study published today. Doctors said yesterday that the coils offer an exciting therapy for aneurysms, which kill more than 20,000 people annually in the United States alone. They can be inserted without cutting into brain tissue and subjecting patients to quite as much risk. "This is really a profound change in neurosurgery," said Dr. Kieran Murphy, an interventional radiologist who treated patients in the study at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1996
OAKLAND, Calif. -- David Cone turned his already impressive comeback story into an amazing tale yesterday when he pitched seven no-hit innings against the Oakland Athletics, less than four months after surgery to remove an aneurysm under his right armpit.The New York Yankees pitcher, who was making his first major-league start since May 2, was removed from the game after throwing 85 pitches. The Yankees had announced that he would be limited to 100 pitches, but manager Joe Torre decided it was not worth taking risks with his top starter.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
ELKTON - Mary Elizabeth Kirlain weighed just 81 pounds when her body was discovered in a fetid, trash-strewn room in which she had apparently been confined for years after suffering an aneurysm. Details of her death emerged from documents released yesterday after the father of her three daughters, John Joseph Dougherty, 52, appeared in court. Charged with manslaughter and abuse of a vulnerable adult family member, he was being held at the Cecil County Detention Center in lieu of $350,000 bail.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
MIAMI - Maryland defensive coordinator Gary Blackney takes blame much easier than he absorbs credit. He alone took the criticism when Florida State scored three straight touchdowns. Later he told his boss, head coach Ralph Friedgen, that he'd rather not be nominated for the Broyles Award as America's top assistant even though the Terps had their best defense in years. And while Blackney jokes that he traded up when marrying Lauretta, his wife of nearly 35 years - "the best recruiting job I ever did" - he downplays the difficulty of his role in keeping his family together after she suffered an aneurysm 15 years ago that nearly killed her. "You do what you have to do," Blackney says.
NEWS
February 19, 1999
Libero Gualtieri, 75, an Italian senator who led the parliamentary inquiry into the 1978 kidnap-murder of Italian Prime Minister Aldo Moro, died Monday of an aneurysm in Rome.Pub Date: 2/19/99
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 3, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - When rumors started circulating in the late 1990s that she had multiple sclerosis, actress Teri Garr discovered a lot of Hollywood was afraid to even meet with her about potential acting gigs. Although she managed to keep working, interviews went from rare to nonexistent for the popular comedic actress who was Oscar-nominated for Tootsie. "When you hear the word 'disabled,' people immediately think about people who can't walk or talk or do everything that people take for granted," Garr said in a recent interview.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO AND JEFF ZREBIEC and ROCH KUBATKO AND JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTERS | September 30, 2005
Orioles pitching coach Ray Miller will undergo surgery Oct. 12 to treat an aneurysm below his heart, and his recovery could determine whether he remains in baseball or retires to his home in New Athens, Ohio. "That will dictate everything," he said. The procedure will take place at Johns Hopkins Hospital, with an estimated recovery time of eight weeks. Miller left the team during an August trip to Oakland and was given four medical options. "None of them were good," he said. He declined to have surgery over the winter, but was urged to get it done by October.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,Los Angeles Times | September 25, 2005
WASHINGTON // Vice President Dick Cheney was awake and alert after successfully undergoing surgery to treat swelling in blood vessels behind both knees, the White House said yesterday. Cheney, who has a history of heart attacks, was recovering well after the six-hour surgery under local anesthesia at George Washington University Hospital, according to a White House statement. The White House said the vice president would stay at the hospital as long as 48 hours and was expected to resume his schedule when he returned home.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
ELKTON - Mary Elizabeth Kirlain weighed just 81 pounds when her body was discovered in a fetid, trash-strewn room in which she had apparently been confined for years after suffering an aneurysm. Details of her death emerged from documents released yesterday after the father of her three daughters, John Joseph Dougherty, 52, appeared in court. Charged with manslaughter and abuse of a vulnerable adult family member, he was being held at the Cecil County Detention Center in lieu of $350,000 bail.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
Tiny platinum coils inserted into ruptured brain aneurysms are more effective in many cases than surgery in preventing disability and death, according to a study published today. Doctors said yesterday that the coils offer an exciting therapy for aneurysms, which kill more than 20,000 people annually in the United States alone. They can be inserted without cutting into brain tissue and subjecting patients to quite as much risk. "This is really a profound change in neurosurgery," said Dr. Kieran Murphy, an interventional radiologist who treated patients in the study at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
MIAMI - Maryland defensive coordinator Gary Blackney takes blame much easier than he absorbs credit. He alone took the criticism when Florida State scored three straight touchdowns. Later he told his boss, head coach Ralph Friedgen, that he'd rather not be nominated for the Broyles Award as America's top assistant even though the Terps had their best defense in years. And while Blackney jokes that he traded up when marrying Lauretta, his wife of nearly 35 years - "the best recruiting job I ever did" - he downplays the difficulty of his role in keeping his family together after she suffered an aneurysm 15 years ago that nearly killed her. "You do what you have to do," Blackney says.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 3, 1991
Q: Do you have any tips that may stop further attacks of lower back pain?A: Maintain good posture when standing, walking or running. Keep your backbone straight by pulling in your stomach and chin and holding your shoulders back.Maintain good posture when sitting by supporting your spine and supporting muscles.Lose weight to lessen the burden on the lower spine and supporting muscles.Exercise to strengthen the muscles of your back and abdomen. Ask your physician for instructions for appropriate exercises.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,Los Angeles Times | September 25, 2005
WASHINGTON // Vice President Dick Cheney was awake and alert after successfully undergoing surgery to treat swelling in blood vessels behind both knees, the White House said yesterday. Cheney, who has a history of heart attacks, was recovering well after the six-hour surgery under local anesthesia at George Washington University Hospital, according to a White House statement. The White House said the vice president would stay at the hospital as long as 48 hours and was expected to resume his schedule when he returned home.
NEWS
February 14, 2000
"Lonesome" Dave Peverett, 56, who as lead singer of the British blues-rock quartet Foghat produced rock staples such as "Slow Ride," "Fool for the City" and "Honey Hush," died Monday in Orlando, Fla., of complications from kidney cancer. Edna Griffin, 90, an Iowa civil-rights pioneer best known for integrating lunch counters, died Tuesday in Des Moines. In 1948, Ms. Griffin led the fight against Katz Drug Store in Des Moines, which refused to serve blacks at its lunch counter. Ms. Griffin staged sit-ins, picketed at the store and filed charges against the store owner, who was fined.
NEWS
February 19, 1999
Libero Gualtieri, 75, an Italian senator who led the parliamentary inquiry into the 1978 kidnap-murder of Italian Prime Minister Aldo Moro, died Monday of an aneurysm in Rome.Pub Date: 2/19/99
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