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By Catherine L. Gilliss | September 20, 2010
Would you pay two mechanics with equivalent skills to both work on your car if one of them could do the job alone? Obviously not, yet that's the kind of unnecessary cost you're likely to pay if you're among the many patients every year who get sick or injured and require anesthesia. Two groups of medical professionals are trained to administer anesthesia: nurses who have been specially trained as nurse anesthetists and physicians specially trained as anesthesiologists. Despite compelling evidence that both groups provide equally safe anesthesia care, the majority of states, including Maryland, still adhere to a federal government rule requiring nurse anesthetists to be supervised by physician anesthesiologists when providing care to Medicare and Medicaid patients.
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FEATURES
January 11, 2013
When my Chihuahua had her teeth cleaned last week, the vet said her heart rate went down into the high 60s and that an episode of second-degree heart block occurred, but they reversed it with meds. Does this mean she is at risk of it happening again under anesthesia? Other than perhaps a follow-up EKG at her next comprehensive exam, should anything else be done? I am scared to have her teeth cleaned again. First, I would schedule a consult with this pet's veterinarian and review the risks and the benefits of the procedure.
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FEATURES
January 11, 2013
When my Chihuahua had her teeth cleaned last week, the vet said her heart rate went down into the high 60s and that an episode of second-degree heart block occurred, but they reversed it with meds. Does this mean she is at risk of it happening again under anesthesia? Other than perhaps a follow-up EKG at her next comprehensive exam, should anything else be done? I am scared to have her teeth cleaned again. First, I would schedule a consult with this pet's veterinarian and review the risks and the benefits of the procedure.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Sometimes men are the ones to take care of birth control through a surgical procedure. But when those men and their partners have a change of heart about children for any number of reasons, they seek to reverse their vasectomies. And that's usually possible, even long after the original procedure, says Dr. Brad Lerner, co-director of the Vasectomy Reversal Center of America a division of Chesapeake Urology. Lerner answers questions about getting and reversing a vasectomy. How common are vasectomies?
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | June 12, 2008
My mother recently had surgery and now is experiencing significant memory loss. The doctor said anesthesia sometimes affects memory. How long will this last, and is there anything we can do to help her recover? Surgeons and anesthesiologists are aware that surgery may pose risks to mental function, especially in older people. They call this condition postoperative cognitive decline (POCD). There is controversy as to whether the problem is brought on by anesthesia or by surgery itself.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Dr. Robert A. Abraham, a physician who directed Johns Hopkins Hospital's obstetrics anesthesia program and was a leader in childbirth safety, died of an apparent brain hemorrhage Feb. 3 at his Lutherville home. He was 79. Born in Mahanoy City, Pa., and raised in Reading, Pa., he earned his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Franklin & Marshall College and his medical degree from the University of Maryland. As part of his duties as a resident at what is now University of Maryland Medical Center, he delivered babies in West Baltimore homes.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | September 4, 1993
The health problems associated with deteriorating teeth and gums in older dogs and cats generally outweigh the risks of modern anesthesia.But despite the advances in veterinary practice, not a day goes by that I don't hear someone say, "The vet said my pet's teeth are in bad shape, but I can't take a chance on anesthesia -- my pet's too old."For your pet's sake, educate yourself on anesthesia. Although it's a mainstay in any veterinary practice, there are many misconceptions about its use and its risks, especially where older animals are concerned.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,New York Times News Service | August 30, 1994
Anesthesia is one of the most effective medical interventions, yet one of the least understood. Since the nature of consciousness is a fundamental mystery, perhaps it is not surprising that the art of rendering people unconscious also defies exact understanding.These gaps in knowledge mean that anesthesiologists have no reliable ways to gauge when a person is unconscious. On rare occasions patients wake up during surgery."I came out of the anesthetic and couldn't understand why I wasn't in the ward," said one patient who was undergoing surgery in a British hospital, quoted in a recent book on anesthesia.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 28, 2004
I'm about to have hip surgery, and I'm worried after I read an article that said anesthesia might lead to memory loss. What can you tell me about it? Researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that major surgery is associated with a drop in test scores for concentration, mental speed and verbal ability in some elderly patients. The surgeries in the study were primarily joint replacements, and the average age of the patients was 69. Two years after the surgery, 42 percent of them scored below their baseline pre-surgery tests.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1998
Women looking to ease the pain of childbirth have a new weapon -- the power to self-medicate during labor and delivery.No waiting for doctors or nurses. No agony. Just a simple gadget that provides an instant dose of anesthesia with the push of a button.For the first time in the Baltimore area, such technology is in reach -- but only at Carroll County General Hospital, a small community hospital in Westminster."This was the first time I had an epidural that worked, that I could control all through the labor and delivery," said Betsy Berner, 35, who had her third child, Emily, in the county hospital's Family BirthPlace.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Dr. Mark I. Rossberg, a pediatric anesthesiologist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of prostate cancer at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 50. "Mark was a superbly talented anesthesiologist and a masterful clinician-educator, but above all he was the consummate pediatrician," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
EXPLORE
August 10, 2011
The engagement of the children of Lawrence and Rose Ward, of Pinellas Park, Fla., and Charles Getscher and the late Elizabeth Ann Getscher, of Jarrettsville, has been announced. The couple, Christina Lynn Ward and Michael Wayne Getscher, both from Jarrettsville, has a wedding date of Nov. 11 set in Pinellas County, Fla., at Islands Bamboo Gardens. The prospective groom is a journeyman electrician and the bride to be is a general anesthesia coordinator at Berg Dental Group in Forest Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Zoe, a 16-year-old giraffe at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , died Thursday after receiving anesthesia during a medical procedure. The reticulated giraffe was a favorite of visitors who occasionally were allowed to feed her "We are stunned by the sudden loss," Zoo president Don Hutchinson said in a news release. "Zoe was truly part of our zoo family. " Zoe was anesthetized while getting her hooves trimmed — a procedure that is medically necessary to prevent overgrown toenails from becoming painful, and interfering with a giraffe's ability to walk.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Catherine Gillis' op-ed, "Anesthesia's unneeded duplication" (Sept. 20) is really about efforts to eliminate the best trained providers in the interests of finances. One can only wonder if Ms. Gillis would truly wish for herself or a family member to undergo anesthesia in the absence of a physician to manage unexpected complications. There are many dimensions to the drive to reduce health care costs. Can she really be advocating that we drive down the level of training and skill of health care providers?
NEWS
By Catherine L. Gilliss | September 20, 2010
Would you pay two mechanics with equivalent skills to both work on your car if one of them could do the job alone? Obviously not, yet that's the kind of unnecessary cost you're likely to pay if you're among the many patients every year who get sick or injured and require anesthesia. Two groups of medical professionals are trained to administer anesthesia: nurses who have been specially trained as nurse anesthetists and physicians specially trained as anesthesiologists. Despite compelling evidence that both groups provide equally safe anesthesia care, the majority of states, including Maryland, still adhere to a federal government rule requiring nurse anesthetists to be supervised by physician anesthesiologists when providing care to Medicare and Medicaid patients.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2008
Maryland Zoo officials say they're still puzzled by the death of a 23-year-old chimpanzee during an examination Thursday. "This was quite sudden and not something we were expecting," Rebecca Gullott, the zoo's mammal collection and conservation manager, said yesterday. "This was a very sad occasion for us because we develop strong bonds to the animals we care for." Since Sunday, Rustie, the largest of 11 chimps in the zoo's troop, had been lethargic and reluctant to eat, zookeepers said.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes did not undergo a minor surgical procedure as planned last week because of complications with the anesthesia, a spokesman said yesterday. Sarbanes, 69, remained yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was admitted Thursday morning to have a benign growth removed from his parotid, or salivary, gland, said spokesman Jesse Jacobs. When doctors on Thursday administered anesthesia to Sarbanes, it caused his blood pressure to increase, Jacobs said. "It caused enough concern with the medical professionals there that they did not go through with the procedure," Jacobs said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Zoe, a 16-year-old giraffe at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , died Thursday after receiving anesthesia during a medical procedure. The reticulated giraffe was a favorite of visitors who occasionally were allowed to feed her "We are stunned by the sudden loss," Zoo president Don Hutchinson said in a news release. "Zoe was truly part of our zoo family. " Zoe was anesthetized while getting her hooves trimmed — a procedure that is medically necessary to prevent overgrown toenails from becoming painful, and interfering with a giraffe's ability to walk.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | June 12, 2008
My mother recently had surgery and now is experiencing significant memory loss. The doctor said anesthesia sometimes affects memory. How long will this last, and is there anything we can do to help her recover? Surgeons and anesthesiologists are aware that surgery may pose risks to mental function, especially in older people. They call this condition postoperative cognitive decline (POCD). There is controversy as to whether the problem is brought on by anesthesia or by surgery itself.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
Cosmetic surgery might look easy and danger-free on television programs. It might be readily available through the nearest doctor's office. But it is still surgery, and surgery carries risk. "On television, people are always having extreme makeovers," said Dr. David Song, chief of plastic surgery at University of Chicago Hospitals. "People don't understand it's real surgery with real risks." On top of that, cosmetic procedures are a lucrative fee-for-service business. Insurance typically does not cover them, except for reconstructive surgery, so people pay cash if they want their face lifted or tummy tucked.
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