Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnemia
IN THE NEWS

Anemia

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 26, 2009
People of all ages, from newborns to the elderly, may experience anemia - the lack of healthy red blood cells in the body - at some point in their lives. It is estimated that there are 3.5 million people in the United States who have anemia. Dr. Meyer R. Heyman, a hematologist who directs the Center for Blood Disorders at St. Agnes Hospital, discusses the condition. * Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body; therefore, those with anemia do not get sufficient oxygen-rich blood.
HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Halfway around the world in India, Sivaprakash Ramalingam had heard of Johns Hopkins researchers using a promising new technique for gene therapy that he hoped to integrate with stem cells to cure diseases. After getting a doctorate in biochemistry in his native country, he came to Baltimore four years ago to study under the technique's pioneer, Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ramalingam's research has led him down the path of seeking a cure for sickle cell anemia, a painful, life-shortening blood disorder that afflicts many in his home region in southern India.
SPORTS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
At times, she felt the team was against her and the coach was against her. All the time, she knew her body was against her. Antoinette Reese couldn't win. So she wouldn't try any more. She wouldn't return to Coppin State. It almost would have been forgivable to quit. A knee injury nearly ended her basketball career once. A chronic blood disorder nearly did it once more. She persevered anyway, but so did her anemia. During a routine run around campus in preparation for her senior season, she collapsed onto the pavement.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 25, 1995
The U.N. suffers from arteriosclerosis, dementia, infantilism, anemia, babbling and lots more, and it's only 50.If BankAmerica does merge with NationsBank, all hope for correct English will be GoneForever.The General's book tour was so triumphant, he should certainly write another book.N Boris Yeltsin will never make admiral in today's U.S. navy.
NEWS
April 21, 2005
On April 19, 2005, WILLIAM "Bill"HOWARD of Freeland, beloved husband of Margaret Jones Curtis; devoted father of Lisa Mac Sherry, Julianne Costello and Laurie Roe; dear brother of George H. Curtis. Also survived by five grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Interment private. A memorial gathering will be held in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Rd (at York Rd.) Timonium-Cockeysville, on Friday April 22, from 5 to 9 P.M., and Saturday, April 23, from 12:30 to 2 P.M., at which time services will begin.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Sheila Parsons is a big fan of actor Danny Glover and stood in line to get his autograph yesterday. But she wasn't braving frigid, wet conditions at the Inner Harbor just for him, and he wasn't there promoting a new movie. Both participated in Maryland's first Kidney Walk at Rash Field, an event organized by the National Kidney Foundation that drew about 200 people. Some of them, such as Parsons, are suffering from kidney disease and awaiting transplants. "You are truly, truly the faithful out here," Glover said, addressing the crowd huddled beneath a wooden pagoda, before the walk.
HEALTH
December 14, 2009
When is a cold not a cold? The answer could be when it is fifth disease, according to Dr. John Cmar, an infectious disease specialist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. Even if you've never heard of this virus, chances are good that you have been - or will be - exposed to it, often without even knowing it. More than 70 percent of adults have had it at some time during their lives. •Fifth disease is human parvovirus B19. It is most commonly associated with young children, although adults, too, can contract it. It is also called "slapped cheek disease" because in children, a rash often appears on the face, making it look as though the cheeks have been hit. It lasts between one and two weeks, but sufferers often feel better before then.
NEWS
By These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. If informationhasn't been published about someone in your family who has passed away, please call Michael R. Driscoll at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211; you may also fax your information to us at 332-6677 | July 24, 1991
Services for Argaree Belk Hickey of Glen Burnie will take place at 11 a.m. today at Nichols Bethel United Methodist Church, where she wasa member.Mrs. Hickey, 75, died July 22 of a heart attack at Kimbrough Army Medical Center.Originally from Billsborough, Texas, she was a homemaker who was active in church affairs. Other interests included crafts, sewing, and reading.Survivors include her husband of 53 years, Frank L. Hickey; a daughter, Carolyn H. Cooper of Odenton; a brother, Roland Belkof San Antonio, Texas; a sister, Helen Trumble of Lancaster, Calif.
HEALTH
December 14, 2009
When is a cold not a cold? The answer could be when it is fifth disease, according to Dr. John Cmar, an infectious disease specialist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. Even if you've never heard of this virus, chances are good that you have been - or will be - exposed to it, often without even knowing it. More than 70 percent of adults have had it at some time during their lives. •Fifth disease is human parvovirus B19. It is most commonly associated with young children, although adults, too, can contract it. It is also called "slapped cheek disease" because in children, a rash often appears on the face, making it look as though the cheeks have been hit. It lasts between one and two weeks, but sufferers often feel better before then.
NEWS
October 26, 2009
People of all ages, from newborns to the elderly, may experience anemia - the lack of healthy red blood cells in the body - at some point in their lives. It is estimated that there are 3.5 million people in the United States who have anemia. Dr. Meyer R. Heyman, a hematologist who directs the Center for Blood Disorders at St. Agnes Hospital, discusses the condition. * Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body; therefore, those with anemia do not get sufficient oxygen-rich blood.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 21, 2008
In 2001, I had a very strong urge to chew on ice. After reading in your column that this could be a sign of anemia, I told my doctor about it. The blood work showed anemia, and I was advised to get a colonoscopy. This test showed cancer in the colon. I had surgery and received six months of chemo. The operation removed 10 inches of my colon. Testing the lymph nodes showed that the cancer had spread to three out of 15 tested. I wouldn't have mentioned the craving for ice cubes had I not read about it in your column.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 11, 2008
Gabrielle Keiran Dreistadt, a Wilde Lake Middle School honor student who worked with abused animals and through her church assisted senior citizens and others who needed a spare hand, died of aplastic anemia Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Columbia resident was 12. Gabrielle, who was born and raised in Columbia, was diagnosed in March with the disease that took her life. Aplastic anemia occurs when bone marrow fails to produce sufficient blood cells. "She was a strong and healthy girl who suddenly got sick," said her mother, Holly Anne Conti of Columbia.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
Taking the next step in a series of breakthrough stem-cell experiments, scientists have cured sickle- cell anemia in mice by rewinding their skin cells to an embryonic state and manipulating them to create healthy, genetically matched replacement tissue. After the repaired cells were transfused into the animals, they soon began producing healthy blood cells free of the crippling deformities that deprive organs of oxygen, scientists from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | September 23, 2007
We have owned shares of Amgen Inc. for some time, but we're disappointed in the stock performance and are considering selling. What is your opinion of the company? - J.E., via the Internet An advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration recently seems to have improved the financial prognosis for the world's largest biotechnology company. The panel voted against a proposal that would have resulted in a decrease in the recommended dosage of anemia drugs given to many patients.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 21, 2008
In 2001, I had a very strong urge to chew on ice. After reading in your column that this could be a sign of anemia, I told my doctor about it. The blood work showed anemia, and I was advised to get a colonoscopy. This test showed cancer in the colon. I had surgery and received six months of chemo. The operation removed 10 inches of my colon. Testing the lymph nodes showed that the cancer had spread to three out of 15 tested. I wouldn't have mentioned the craving for ice cubes had I not read about it in your column.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | June 3, 2007
Medical student Clarence Lam marveled at the feast that a drug company sponsored this spring at the Inner Harbor's upscale Capital Grille. The night's appetizer was seafood, the entree was filet mignon and dessert was cheesecake. "They paid for everything," recalled Lam, 26, who attends the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "They even covered the wine." Like other drugmakers, Novartis Pharmaceutical Co. sponsors such events to woo practicing doctors and to promote its products to future physicians such as Lam. It's a common marketing tactic that is raising concerns on medical school campuses nationwide.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.