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Andy Warhol

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By Mike Giuliano | December 14, 2011
Andy Warhol died in 1987, but he continues to make headlines. This is almost literally the case with a National Gallery of Art exhibit, "Warhol: Headlines," that showcases screenprints and paintings whose design imitates that of a newspaper front page. A second Washington exhibit, "Andy Warhol: Shadows" at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, presents an ambitious painting done late in the artist's career. Although there have been many Warhol-related exhibits over the years, "Warhol: Headlines" is the first to focus so closely on his newspaper-derived artwork.
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By Aaron Oster and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
WWE Hall of Famer "Rowdy" Roddy Piper is in a new movie, "Pro Wrestlers vs. Zombies. " I had a chance to speak with him about the movie, the upcoming Wrestlemania, the WWE Network, his feelings toward WWE and their feelings toward him. Ring Posts: Are you going to be involved at all with Wrestlemania Weekend? Roddy Piper: I'm going to be there. You know, that's a good question. I have a lot of thoughts about it. I don't know any other entertainment sport where 30 years later you could give the fans the opportunity to see the two guys who started it at the War to Settle The Score.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
At age 82, Bennard B. Perlman, the noted Baltimore artist, critic, author, professor and lecturer, is as busy as ever and shows no sign of slowing down. The other day he called to say he was looking forward to the BMA's "Andy Warhol: The Last Decade" exhibition, which opens Oct. 17 . The forthcoming exhibition has special significance for Perlman, who was a close friend of Warhol's when the two were painting and design classmates from 1945 to 1949 at Carnegie Tech, now Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Lou Reed, the trail-blazing musician who died Sunday at the age of 71, left a non-musical mark on Baltimore a couple years ago. When the popular exhibit "Andy Warhol: The Last Decade" was at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Oct. 17, 2010 to Jan. 9, 2011, visitors who plugged into the audio tour heard Reed's voice providing the narration. Reed had a longtime connection to Warhol, who had been a sponsor of the Velvet Underground in the 1960s. "Lou Reed's instantly recognizable voice brought the feel of New York City's cutting edge culture of the 1970s and early '80s to the experience of our exhibition," said Kristen Hileman, the BMA's Curator of Contemporary Art. "It was a thrill to have a rock and roll legend be a part of the BMA experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 23, 2001
Since childhood, I've heard hundreds of attempts to answer the question "What is art?". The best answer for me is: Art's what changes people. Real art's defining purpose is to force sentient humans to reconsider their perceptions and the mechanisms by which they perceive. In whatever form art takes, its mission is to jolt the senses. For the last few days, my occasional refuge from the barbaric events of Sept. 11 has been to consider art's purpose, particularly in the context of the life of Andy Warhol.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- Andy Warhol captured the 1960s in all its giddy heights of narcissism, exhibitionism and consumerism -- an artistic quest that made an indelible impression on popular culture and brought him celebrity and wealth. Now, nearly a dozen years after his death, Warhol's little-known spiritual side has emerged from an under-explored body of the pop artist's works.A pious Catholic, Warhol produced more than 100 drawings, prints and paintings with religious themes. Among them are a monumental series of at least 40 paintings inspired by the familiar "Last Supper" of Leonardo da Vinci that Berkeley art historian Jane Daggett Dillenberger describes as the largest series of religious art by a major American artist.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
The FBI raided Barry H. Landau's Manhattan apartment twice, hauling out thousands of documents that authorities say link him to a theft scheme involving historical artifacts pilfered from libraries and museums in Baltimore, elsewhere in the United States and in the United Kingdom. But agents didn't take everything from his $2,700-a-month rent-controlled apartment. The 63-year-old who was arrested in Baltimore in July is seeking permission from a federal judge to sell some of his prized artifacts to pay his rent and other "everyday living expenses" while he is out on bail awaiting trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 21, 2000
The elaborate generosity of the English language ought to distinguish more clearly than it does between fame and celebrity. To be famous is to be known for one's virtue, merit, accomplishments or exemplary deeds. The ancient Romans made portraits of illustrious individuals and coupled them with glowing testimonials that reconfirmed their right to good reputation and fame. But to be a celebrity is to be known merely for being well-known. Celebrity depends not so much on virtue or accomplishment as on the mass propagation of attractive images abundantly distributed before the public eye. This is the truth behind Andy Warhol's oft-quoted dictum that in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 24, 1999
In 1976, when the Baltimore Museum of Art was trying to purchase a new work by the Minimalist artist Donald Judd, it was New York art dealer Leo Castelli who made the impossible happen. As former BMA deputy director Brenda Richardson recalled it, the museum had recently exhibited Judd's Minimalist plywood boxes and felt strongly it should have one in its own collection. But there was a problem: Castelli, who was regarded as the most influentual dealer of his age and whose gallery was a showcase for a virtual Who's Who of talent that made New York the center of contemporary art, was selling Judd's boxes for $60,000 apiece.
FEATURES
December 28, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Andy Warhol (above) is featured in Imagining America: Icons of 20th Century American Art (9 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67).
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Joe Boylan was sitting with Jimmy Patsos at last Saturday's Loyola-Duke lacrosse game when the former athletic director asked the man he had hired as the school's basketball coach eight years ago if he had any preference as to where Greyhounds would play their first NCAA tournament game in 18 years. "Jimmy wanted to go to Pittsburgh because our fans could get there - and then he said, 'I've set it up for the team to go to the Andy Warhol Museum,'" Boylan recalled Monday. "How many coaches whose teams are going to the NCAA tournament are thinking about that?
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 14, 2011
Andy Warhol died in 1987, but he continues to make headlines. This is almost literally the case with a National Gallery of Art exhibit, "Warhol: Headlines," that showcases screenprints and paintings whose design imitates that of a newspaper front page. A second Washington exhibit, "Andy Warhol: Shadows" at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, presents an ambitious painting done late in the artist's career. Although there have been many Warhol-related exhibits over the years, "Warhol: Headlines" is the first to focus so closely on his newspaper-derived artwork.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Art collectors take note: There's an Andy Warhol about to hit the market. Federal prosecutors in Baltimore have approved the sale of a Liz Taylor print — aptly titled "Liz" — and several other artifacts from the private collection of Barry H. Landau, who's accused of stealing historic documents from museums on both sides of the Atlantic. It's still up to a judge to sign off on the deal, however. Landau's lawyers had asked last month that their client be allowed to liquidate some of his prized assets to pay for "living expenses" — including $2,700 per month in rent for his Manhattan apartment — while he's out on bail awaiting trial in the city's U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
The FBI raided Barry H. Landau's Manhattan apartment twice, hauling out thousands of documents that authorities say link him to a theft scheme involving historical artifacts pilfered from libraries and museums in Baltimore, elsewhere in the United States and in the United Kingdom. But agents didn't take everything from his $2,700-a-month rent-controlled apartment. The 63-year-old who was arrested in Baltimore in July is seeking permission from a federal judge to sell some of his prized artifacts to pay his rent and other "everyday living expenses" while he is out on bail awaiting trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Viewers see first the beast's ravenous mouth, with six fangs increasing in size and as pointed as daggers. The fiend is wearing a "Vote" button with an image of the American flag, and its tail snakes into a dollar sign. Even before gallery-goers scan the caption — "Monstrous costs: Total House and Senate campaign expenditures" — they have a good idea which dismal fact of modern life is being illustrated. Moreover, they know exactly how artist Nigel Holmes feels about the increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2010
1. Ravens vs Buffalo Bills M&T Bank Stadium 1101 Russell St., Baltimore, MD . 2. Andy Warhol: The Last Decade Baltimore Museum of Art 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD . 3. B.o.B., Wale and Donis Towson Center Arena 8000 York Road, Towson, MD . 4. Downtown Baltimore Oyster Week Downtown Baltimore Charles Street and Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD . 5. 'Grease' Sing-A-Long Bengies Drive-In Theatre 3417 Eastern Blvd, Middle River, MD . 6. What Makes Us Smile?
NEWS
September 15, 2010
Although "A Casting Call For Warhols" (Sept. 14) calls the late artist shallow, the article itself is hardly profound. It focuses on Andy Warhol's lack of communication in public, forgetting this was how he encouraged others to open up about their personal and professional lives. It also ignores the fact that the painter's works routinely sell for millions at auction, and that he is already the permanent subject of a museum in Pittsburgh. So I doubt that the Baltimore Museum of Art 's upcoming Warhol display will "burnish his reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2010
1. Ravens vs Buffalo Bills M&T Bank Stadium 1101 Russell St., Baltimore, MD . 2. Andy Warhol: The Last Decade Baltimore Museum of Art 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD . 3. B.o.B., Wale and Donis Towson Center Arena 8000 York Road, Towson, MD . 4. Downtown Baltimore Oyster Week Downtown Baltimore Charles Street and Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD . 5. 'Grease' Sing-A-Long Bengies Drive-In Theatre 3417 Eastern Blvd, Middle River, MD . 6. What Makes Us Smile?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
The very first artwork that visitors to the new Andy Warhol exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art will see costs $88 a roll — a mere pittance for a masterpiece — and must be pasted up carefully to avoid air bubbles. Unlike most of the priceless canvases inside "Andy Warhol: the Last Decade," which opens Oct. 17, no alarm bells will sound if guests rest their backs against the artist's self-portrait, or reach over to tweak his paper nose. Museum officials won't rush to dial their insurance carrier if Warhol's creation gets smudged or even a bit raggedy during the nearly three months it will be on display.
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