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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 19, 1997
The FX cable channel makes its bid to become a power in prime-time television tonight, with exclusive repeats (airing in the order in which they were originally broadcast) of two of TV's most powerful dramas.First comes "The X-Files" (8 p.m.-9 p.m.), with the series' 1993 premiere. The ever-skeptical Scully (Gillian Anderson) is assigned by her FBI superiors to keep an eye on Agent Mulder (David Duchovny), whose career has been devoted to solving the bureau's unexplained cases -- known collectively as the X-files, and largely having to do with the paranormal, extraterrestrials and the like.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 14, 2008
Kyra Sedgwick has her own personal take on the appeal of her hit cable series, The Closer, and it goes dead against the conventional wisdom of character growth as the key to great drama. Sedgwick believes LAPD Deputy Police Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson is such a fan favorite in large part because she shows no real growth, emotional or otherwise - ever. "You know, it's funny, but that's sort of the thing about her, she's really not that changed since the start of the series," says Sedgwick, who also serves as co-executive producer.
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By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Andy Sipowicz doesn't want to die. More precisely, Dennis Franz, who has played the ornery detective for 11 seasons on NYPD Blue, doesn't want him to die. NYPD Blue will end its ABC run this coming season. There's a slim chance it could get an 11th-hour reprieve, according to new ABC Entertainment President Steve McPherson. "But right now, we're really planning on making this a fantastic season to send the show off." This is fine with Franz. "I'm ready ... for the show to end. I'm ready for Sipowicz to end."
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | December 25, 2005
THE SHIELD: SEASON 4 / / Fox / / $59.98 / The Shield is one of television's angriest and most violent dramas. But, like HBO's The Sopranos, it is also one of the medium's most inspired and daring crime series. After three seasons of riding the Emmy-Award-winning performance of Michael Chiklis as rogue detective Vic Mackey, the series added Tony and Emmy Award winner Glenn Close as Mackey's new boss in Season 4, which is being released Tuesday on DVD. It was just the kind of jolt the program needed.
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By Ray Frager and Ray Frager,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
For those of you in a hurry, here's the deal on Jimmy Smits' debut in "NYPD Blue": There are bare buttocks, but none of them belongs to Smits.Smits joins the ABC series tonight (WJZ-Channel 13 at 10 p.m.) as Det. Bobby Simone. He's replacing David Caruso, who played the sometimes-unclothed Det. John Kelly. (Caruso left in a salary dispute. Kelly quit rather than accept a transfer.)It seems a natural enough replacement. As attorney Victor Sifuentes, Smits often was shirtless on another Stephen Bochco series, "L.A.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 11, 2000
Seeing tonight's season premiere of "NYPD Blue" made me mad all over again about ABC's crackpot decision to give its time slot to "Once and Again" until "Monday Night Football" ended. I forgot how great this series is when it's on its game, and "NYPD Blue" is definitely on its game tonight. Much of the hour is spent with Detectives Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) and Danny Sorenson (Rick Schroder) investigating the possibility that two fellow officers beat to death a low-life known as Poodlehead Mikey.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 15, 1998
"NYPD Blue" is absolutely in the zone. Outstanding episodes seem to just keep coming this season.From the goodbye-Jimmy-Smits story arc to the hello-Rick-Schroder episodes, the consistent quality of this venerable cop drama is remarkable.And, tonight, comes another powerful and profound hour as Detective Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) and his boss, Lt. Arthur Fancy (James McDaniel), go at it over matters of race. And I mean go at -- fists flying in the men's room in a scene that will leave your heart pounding almost as hard as those of these two middle-aged cops.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | December 25, 2005
THE SHIELD: SEASON 4 / / Fox / / $59.98 / The Shield is one of television's angriest and most violent dramas. But, like HBO's The Sopranos, it is also one of the medium's most inspired and daring crime series. After three seasons of riding the Emmy-Award-winning performance of Michael Chiklis as rogue detective Vic Mackey, the series added Tony and Emmy Award winner Glenn Close as Mackey's new boss in Season 4, which is being released Tuesday on DVD. It was just the kind of jolt the program needed.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 19, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Korean-American comedian Margaret Cho stars in a new ABC sitcom about a Korean-American woman titled "All American Girl." So, you can imagine there were a number of questions from television critics about Korean-American culture during her press conference.Some were the kinds of questions only people who have covered shows such as "Petticoat Junction" too long can ask, such as: "Margaret, with the situation in Korea, do you expect a backlash against your show?"But Cho handled them marvelously.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 15, 2005
Poor Vic Mackey. First, he lost all that money from the Armenian money train. Then he lost his elite Strike Team and was busted back to grunt-level detective duty. And now, he's got a new boss who sits him down her first day on the job and says, "You've got one week to get your [expletive] together" - or things are going to get worse. Even Mackey (Michael Chiklis), the rogue street cop and master of precinct-house insubordination on FX's The Shield, isn't eager to challenge this lady, Capt.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 15, 2005
Poor Vic Mackey. First, he lost all that money from the Armenian money train. Then he lost his elite Strike Team and was busted back to grunt-level detective duty. And now, he's got a new boss who sits him down her first day on the job and says, "You've got one week to get your [expletive] together" - or things are going to get worse. Even Mackey (Michael Chiklis), the rogue street cop and master of precinct-house insubordination on FX's The Shield, isn't eager to challenge this lady, Capt.
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By Lorena Blas | March 1, 2005
As NYPD Blue fades to black with tonight's episode, we take a fond look back at the revolving door of characters who passed through the 15th Precinct during the show's 12-year run. They came, they loved, they fought crime, they drank too much, they bared their bottoms and - with the exception of mainstay Dennis Franz, who played Detective Andy Sipowicz - they eventually left the show. Here's where some of the Blue's crew ended up. David Caruso (1993-1994) The first season of Blue propelled Caruso into superstardom.
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By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Andy Sipowicz doesn't want to die. More precisely, Dennis Franz, who has played the ornery detective for 11 seasons on NYPD Blue, doesn't want him to die. NYPD Blue will end its ABC run this coming season. There's a slim chance it could get an 11th-hour reprieve, according to new ABC Entertainment President Steve McPherson. "But right now, we're really planning on making this a fantastic season to send the show off." This is fine with Franz. "I'm ready ... for the show to end. I'm ready for Sipowicz to end."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 14, 2001
Rage as shtick. In the end, that's what ABC's midseason police drama "The Job," starring Denis Leary as an unconventional and almost-out-of-control New York City detective, comes down to. It takes the profound, righteous, urban, cop-shop rage of an Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz of "NYPD Blue") or Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher of "Homicide: Life on the Street") and shrinks it to attitude and rant played for laughs rather than insight into our lives. This is television as the incredible shrinking culture machine, and I hate the medium when it takes the antisocial out of our sociology and refashions it into something safe, tame and even cute.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 22, 2000
The conventional wisdom is that "NYPD Blue" is on the skids. The ratings are supposed to be down, and the quality, too. The problem with conventional wisdom is that is often wrong when it comes to TV. In fact, the ratings are up this year for "NYPD," by 13 percent, from about 15 million viewers a night last year at this time to 17 million. That is significant considering the weak lead-in the series gets from "Sports Night," a series that is struggling in the ratings. The show has been in a bit of a slump creatively, playing at times almost like self-parody thanks to dialogue over-burdened by cop jargon, which can have everybody sounding alike.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 11, 2000
Seeing tonight's season premiere of "NYPD Blue" made me mad all over again about ABC's crackpot decision to give its time slot to "Once and Again" until "Monday Night Football" ended. I forgot how great this series is when it's on its game, and "NYPD Blue" is definitely on its game tonight. Much of the hour is spent with Detectives Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) and Danny Sorenson (Rick Schroder) investigating the possibility that two fellow officers beat to death a low-life known as Poodlehead Mikey.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 26, 1994
Today marks the scheduled start of the Whitewater hearings, which will be carried live (beginning at 9:30 a.m.) by CNN -- but won't exactly get the saturation coverage earmarked for anything having to do with O. J. Simpson. As for entertainment programming tonight, the freshest offering is the second episode of Michael Moore's "TV Nation."* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The premiere of this series didn't exactly grab the TV nation: The show finished third in its time period. Part of that is due to the fact that this series is mature enough, in content and concepts, to belong at 9 p.m. or 10 p.m. instead, and part may be due to the fact that "TV Nation" is not easily described.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 5, 1998
Strong performances by longtime favorites, such as "ER" and "NYPD Blue," have been the salvation of network television this fall.Now that executive producers Steven Bochco and David Milch have only "NYPD Blue" to worry about, the series seems reinvigorated. They transformed the loss of actor Jimmy Smits into a brilliant story arc on the death of his character, Bobby Simone.This week, they took a successful first step in plugging Rick Schroder into the ensemble as Det. Bobby Sorenson. Funny how all the "Silver Spoons" jokes and wisecracks about Schroder's career as a kid actor have stopped once people saw him in the role.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 15, 1998
"NYPD Blue" is absolutely in the zone. Outstanding episodes seem to just keep coming this season.From the goodbye-Jimmy-Smits story arc to the hello-Rick-Schroder episodes, the consistent quality of this venerable cop drama is remarkable.And, tonight, comes another powerful and profound hour as Detective Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) and his boss, Lt. Arthur Fancy (James McDaniel), go at it over matters of race. And I mean go at -- fists flying in the men's room in a scene that will leave your heart pounding almost as hard as those of these two middle-aged cops.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 5, 1998
Strong performances by longtime favorites, such as "ER" and "NYPD Blue," have been the salvation of network television this fall.Now that executive producers Steven Bochco and David Milch have only "NYPD Blue" to worry about, the series seems reinvigorated. They transformed the loss of actor Jimmy Smits into a brilliant story arc on the death of his character, Bobby Simone.This week, they took a successful first step in plugging Rick Schroder into the ensemble as Det. Bobby Sorenson. Funny how all the "Silver Spoons" jokes and wisecracks about Schroder's career as a kid actor have stopped once people saw him in the role.
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