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Andy Roddick

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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Andy Roddick sat in a big wing-backed chair, spilling sugar and milk and jamming six cookies the size of his hand into his mouth all at once. A crowd of children ranging in age from 4 to 14 giggled and clapped. The newest, brightest star on the ATP Tour, Roddick was taking part in a charitable activity with children from the Washington Tennis & Education Foundation's Arthur Ashe Reading is Fundamental room. He was playing the role of the unsophisticated pelican in the story who had been invited to tea by a very formal crane.
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By Liz Clarke and Liz Clarke,The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - - It was an hour and 20 minutes into the Legg Mason Classic, and Andy Roddick had just reclaimed the momentum after a lapse earlier in the second set. As the American blasted yet another serve past his opponent, Juan Martin del Potro, a lone voice screamed out from a capacity crowd that had been lulled to a stupor by the sweltering heat: "Let's go, Andy! It's hot!" Roddick fell short in his ability to close the match. In the end, it was del Potro, the 6-foot-6 Argentine and the tournament's defending champion, who handled Washington's most miserable afternoon of the summer best, outlasting the oppressive humidity, 97-degree temperature and Roddick's 21 aces to prevail, 3-6, 7-5, 7-6 (6)
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SPORTS
May 31, 2006
Good morning --Andy Roddick --At least you'll always have Paris -- just not for very long.
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By Chuck Culpepper and Chuck Culpepper,Tribune Newspapers | July 6, 2009
WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND -- As the fifth set expanded to 6-6 and 10-10 and then an inconceivable 14-14 and refused to end, this latest masterpiece of a Wimbledon final seemed to heave with the audacious aim of rivaling its hallowed predecessor. Whether it succeeded in the end would prove debatable, but nobody at Centre Court on a sunny, blustery Sunday at the All England Club will lament having witnessed a men's singles final so commendable that the fans wound up chanting the name of the man who did not win. "Roddick!
SPORTS
December 11, 2001
The stars - past, present and future - will be on court at the Baltimore Arena tomorrow night in the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge. World No. 3 Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick, who finished a sensational rookie season ranked No. 16, will face off in the main event. Jana Novotna, the 1998 Wimbledon champ, will join ex-ATP and current Champions Tour star Tim Wilkison in the Smith Barney Legends Match. Novotna and Wilkison will meet Zina Garrison, who won the 1988 Olympic doubles gold medal with Challenge creator Pam Shriver, and Richey Reneberg, a former world No. 1 doubles player and Davis Cup player.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2007
The sight of Andy Roddick playing doubles with his brother John might be unfamiliar to most of the tennis fans who gather tonight at 1st Mariner Arena for the PNC Tennis Classic. But fortunately for Bob and Mike Bryan, the world's No. 1 doubles team, it's an act they've seen before. "We played them in Charleston, [S.C.], last year," Bob Bryan said. "They don't play together very often, but they know how to play. We just clipped them. It was a pretty close match." Their doubles match will follow the feature match between Andy Roddick, No. 5 in the ATP singles standings, and fast-rising John Isner.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - Andy Roddick is an itchy, twitchy guy. Sitting still isn't easy. He has been growing a beard during this Wimbledon fortnight, a scraggly thing that makes Roddick seem an unfinished product, a man still dangling a foot in teenage life. His tennis game, though, has grown up. Roddick used to be an itchy, twitchy guy on the court, too. He jumped around between points and when he hit a ball, his arms and legs had extra movement. It was as if he were a Slinky and his appendages moved in sections.
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By Sloane Brown | December 23, 2001
The atmosphere in the Harbor Court ballroom crackled with excitement. It might have been all the celebrity-signed sports memorabilia up for grabs at the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge's player-welcome reception and silent auction. Maybe all the sports celebrities themselves mingling in the crowd, celebs like tennis stars Zina Garrison, Jana Novotna, Richey Reneberg and Tim Wilkison, former Baltimore Colt Toni Linhart, and Philadelphia Eagle Sean Landeta. Perhaps it was anticipation for the next night's tennis tournament featuring Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick (see Around Town)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Fifth-ranked Andy Roddick was up a set and a break last night in the 22nd annual PNC Tennis Classic when Ashley Card, a fan in the seventh row, yelled at him. "You're too far back," Card advised. Roddick, who was standing about 4 feet behind the service line to receive 6-foot-9 rookie pro John Isner's punishing serve, stopped, turned and invited the construction superintendent from Abingdon to take his place. Card, dressed in a bright yellow shirt and tan shorts, slowly came on down.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Those dreamy dreads. That impish smile. Forget their pro tour rankings or tennis titles, their powerful serves or backhand strokes. Just who is hot, hotter, hottest on and off the court: James Blake or Andy Roddick? And where can you find posters of them shirtless? When the two telegenic players take the court tonight in the Mercantile Tennis Challenge at 1st Mariner Arena, count on untold fans to marvel at the magnitude of their hunkitude, not their scorching aces or volleys. "They are like rock stars," says Carly Van Hollen, who is a 14-year-old rising tennis player and freshman at St. Paul's School for Girls in Brooklandville.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Fifth-ranked Andy Roddick was up a set and a break last night in the 22nd annual PNC Tennis Classic when Ashley Card, a fan in the seventh row, yelled at him. "You're too far back," Card advised. Roddick, who was standing about 4 feet behind the service line to receive 6-foot-9 rookie pro John Isner's punishing serve, stopped, turned and invited the construction superintendent from Abingdon to take his place. Card, dressed in a bright yellow shirt and tan shorts, slowly came on down.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2007
The sight of Andy Roddick playing doubles with his brother John might be unfamiliar to most of the tennis fans who gather tonight at 1st Mariner Arena for the PNC Tennis Classic. But fortunately for Bob and Mike Bryan, the world's No. 1 doubles team, it's an act they've seen before. "We played them in Charleston, [S.C.], last year," Bob Bryan said. "They don't play together very often, but they know how to play. We just clipped them. It was a pretty close match." Their doubles match will follow the feature match between Andy Roddick, No. 5 in the ATP singles standings, and fast-rising John Isner.
SPORTS
May 31, 2006
Good morning --Andy Roddick --At least you'll always have Paris -- just not for very long.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - The video camera was in place when Arnaud Clement took his seat at the front of the mostly empty interview room. Not much interest in the Frenchman who will face James Blake this afternoon for a place in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic semifinals. Clement listened to the first question after his, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory over last season's runner-up Gilles Muller and asked one of his own. "Can I come sit with you?" he asked and actually got up and tried to come sit among the small gathering of reporters.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 25, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - Andy Roddick was well into his swarm to the net yesterday when Daniele Bracciali, whose gift for tennis has remained anonymous during the years, cranked up one of his vapor-trail service returns, leaving Roddick half a nano-second to put his stamp on this gripping five-set match. Whatever instincts take over in those situations, they were there for Roddick, who vaulted off both feet to his right, extended his arm, dropped his racket and bunted a soft volley back cross-court that left his Italian tormentor no play.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 24, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - There was perhaps 10 minutes of playable light left on this uncommonly warm Thursday, just enough time for Andy Roddick to whack a few more unreturnable serves and restore order to a Wimbledon that had been turned on its ear all afternoon by a succession of upstart players. Incredibly, after dominating the free-swinging Italian Daniele Bracciali with his 130-140 mph blasts, Roddick's serve was taken apart in a third-set tiebreak and, instead of going to the locker room yesterday with a cozy ride into the third round, he found himself having to come back today and plot a way to finish off a very dangerous opponent.
SPORTS
August 31, 2002
Men's singles Second round Tim Henman (5), Britain, def. Dick Norman, Belgium, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5. Juan Ignacio Chela (26), Argentina, def. Michael Llodra, France, 7-6 (7), 6-3, 6-2. Gustavo Kuerten, Brazil, def. Marat Safin (2), Russia, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Thomas Enqvist (29), Sweden, def. Alberto Martin, Spain, 6-1, 7-6 (3), 6-0. Sjeng Schalken (24), Netherlands, def. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4. Ramon Delgado, Paraguay, def. Harel Levy, Israel, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (3). Xavier Malisse (19)
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 21, 2005
PARIS - There were two great disappointments as the French Open draw unfolded yesterday. First was the withdrawal of Serena Williams because of an ankle injury. Then, there was the fact that Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer are on the same side of the draw and thus unable to meet in the final. Williams, who won the Australian Open, sprained her left ankle in mid-April. She tried playing in the Italian Open last week, but lost her opening match to Francesca Schiavone in straight sets.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 21, 2005
PARIS - There were two great disappointments as the French Open draw unfolded yesterday. First was the withdrawal of Serena Williams because of an ankle injury. Then, there was the fact that Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer are on the same side of the draw and thus unable to meet in the final. Williams, who won the Australian Open, sprained her left ankle in mid-April. She tried playing in the Italian Open last week, but lost her opening match to Francesca Schiavone in straight sets.
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