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Andy Nelson

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Bettye J. Nelson, who co-founded Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue three decades ago, died Monday of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Glen Arm resident was 77. Bettye J. Bryan, the daughter of a judge and a homemaker, was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., where she graduated from Central High School in 1951. She met her future husband, Andrew V. Nelson Sr., when the two were students at Memphis State College, now the University of Memphis.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
The black-and-white photo hangs unobtrusively on a back wall in Andy Nelson's barbeque joint in Cockeysville. But the picture, taken 53 years ago, captures a pivotal play in the Colts' second world championship, a 31-16 victory over the Giants at a packed Memorial Stadium in 1959. There is Frank Gifford, New York's Hall of Fame halfback, poised to catch a pass. And there is Nelson, the Colts' All Pro safety, swooping in with arms outstretched, ready to intercept. Steal it, Nelson did. The play broke the Giants' backs.
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FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
First, the face:At a glance, it's more a study in geometry than a series of features. The jawbone as angular as an isosceles triangle; the faint lines etched like graph paper around blue eyes; an aristocratic nose, long with a squarish tip; and setting it all off, a nest of blond curls.Put all these together and you have the face that has launched a thousand ads -- clothing, liquor and cologne -- and made its owner, Andy Nelson Jr., one of the most celebrated local models.From the pages of GQ to the runways of Giorgio Armani, the man with the chiseled good looks and easygoing style has worn everything from tuxedos to torn jeans for the camera.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Bettye J. Nelson, who co-founded Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue three decades ago, died Monday of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Glen Arm resident was 77. Bettye J. Bryan, the daughter of a judge and a homemaker, was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., where she graduated from Central High School in 1951. She met her future husband, Andrew V. Nelson Sr., when the two were students at Memphis State College, now the University of Memphis.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2002
There are two things I like to see outside a barbecue restaurant: a pile of wood in the back and a big ol' pig on the roof. Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue in Cockeysville has them both. Inside the restaurant, the waiting area has a laid-back feel and features red and black checkerboard tiles, a ceiling fan and a pig motif. (There's something to be said for celebrating the thing you're about to eat, I suppose.) There are also clippings about Nelson's career as a Baltimore Colt, and a notice about the restaurant from the National BBQ News.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Andy Nelson's Barbecue 11007 York Road, Cockeysville; 410-527-1226; open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday When I check out a barbecue establishment, I always take a gander at the back of the joint. That is where the wood should be stacked. Without wood, there is no smoke. Without smoke, there is no legitimate barbecue. The back of Andy Nelson's barbecue not only had a stack of hickory, it also had rows of picnic tables filled with smiling eaters. The "Cue," in particular the pork, had drawn the crowd.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
The cost of being cool The good news for Baltimore: Somebody thinks the place is cool. The bad news: It's costing the city $10,000. Baltimore has been selected to be host of the National Main Streets Conference called "Cool Cities: Old Buildings, New Attitudes." To be held May 8-11, the event is coordinated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and will be attended by architects, planners and public officials from around the country. "Conference sessions will showcase Baltimore's local success stories and offer a firsthand look at our neighborhoods," according to a summary provided recently to the city's Board of Estimates.
SPORTS
January 9, 2007
FOR FANS OF BALTIMORE FOOTBALL -- COLTS, RAVENS, OR BOTH BARGAIN $248 Section 538, Row 24, Upper level end zone [STUBHUB.COM] WHATEVER HAPPENED TO . . .? Colts DB Andy Nelson Andy Nelson, a Colts defensive back from 1957-63, might not be well-known nationally, but locally his name and barbecue are legendary. A starter on the 1958 and 1959 NFL championship teams, and an All-Pro in 1960, the 73-year-old Nelson stays busy these days as owner of Andy Nelson?s Barbecue in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 21, 1998
EVERY SO OFTEN I get the urge to try a few things, to file a few dispatches from the eating front. So here are a few short accounts of good things I have recently put in my mouth.I'll start with the moist and flavorful pit-beef sandwich I ate at Andy Nelson's in Hunt Valley. One weeknight I had pit beef on the brain. I had finished a long telephone conversation with a writer in Minnesota who had seen John Waters' latest film, "Pecker." Pecker is the film's main character, who lives with a family that runs a pit-beef stand in the yard.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | April 25, 1995
They were there to be with their coach, known by the distinctive name of Weeb since the day his young baby brother began to talk and couldn't say Wilbur. He made the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the basis of transforming two of the world's worst teams into world champions and winning classic games that created an indelible imprint on the records of the sport.Wilbur "Weeb" Ewbank was in the company of four of his former Baltimore Colts, the team that won what's referred to as the greatest game ever played, the sudden-death victory over the New York Giants in 1958.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Andy Nelson's Barbecue 11007 York Road, Cockeysville; 410-527-1226; open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday When I check out a barbecue establishment, I always take a gander at the back of the joint. That is where the wood should be stacked. Without wood, there is no smoke. Without smoke, there is no legitimate barbecue. The back of Andy Nelson's barbecue not only had a stack of hickory, it also had rows of picnic tables filled with smiling eaters. The "Cue," in particular the pork, had drawn the crowd.
SPORTS
January 9, 2007
FOR FANS OF BALTIMORE FOOTBALL -- COLTS, RAVENS, OR BOTH BARGAIN $248 Section 538, Row 24, Upper level end zone [STUBHUB.COM] WHATEVER HAPPENED TO . . .? Colts DB Andy Nelson Andy Nelson, a Colts defensive back from 1957-63, might not be well-known nationally, but locally his name and barbecue are legendary. A starter on the 1958 and 1959 NFL championship teams, and an All-Pro in 1960, the 73-year-old Nelson stays busy these days as owner of Andy Nelson?s Barbecue in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
The cost of being cool The good news for Baltimore: Somebody thinks the place is cool. The bad news: It's costing the city $10,000. Baltimore has been selected to be host of the National Main Streets Conference called "Cool Cities: Old Buildings, New Attitudes." To be held May 8-11, the event is coordinated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and will be attended by architects, planners and public officials from around the country. "Conference sessions will showcase Baltimore's local success stories and offer a firsthand look at our neighborhoods," according to a summary provided recently to the city's Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2002
There are two things I like to see outside a barbecue restaurant: a pile of wood in the back and a big ol' pig on the roof. Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue in Cockeysville has them both. Inside the restaurant, the waiting area has a laid-back feel and features red and black checkerboard tiles, a ceiling fan and a pig motif. (There's something to be said for celebrating the thing you're about to eat, I suppose.) There are also clippings about Nelson's career as a Baltimore Colt, and a notice about the restaurant from the National BBQ News.
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 2000
Just what is it about our love affair with barbecue ribs? The smoky slabs of pork or beef - and even lamb, buffalo and venison - can turn the most mundane dinner into a finger-licking fun fest. If you've never prepared these delicious, messy morsels, Father's Day is a great time to try the stick-to-your-ribs meat. "I suppose there is a mystique about them," says Andy Nelson Jr., the 46-year-old rib master at Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue in Cockeysville. Eating ribs, Nelson says, stimulates "different senses - sight, touch and taste.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 21, 1998
EVERY SO OFTEN I get the urge to try a few things, to file a few dispatches from the eating front. So here are a few short accounts of good things I have recently put in my mouth.I'll start with the moist and flavorful pit-beef sandwich I ate at Andy Nelson's in Hunt Valley. One weeknight I had pit beef on the brain. I had finished a long telephone conversation with a writer in Minnesota who had seen John Waters' latest film, "Pecker." Pecker is the film's main character, who lives with a family that runs a pit-beef stand in the yard.
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 2000
Just what is it about our love affair with barbecue ribs? The smoky slabs of pork or beef - and even lamb, buffalo and venison - can turn the most mundane dinner into a finger-licking fun fest. If you've never prepared these delicious, messy morsels, Father's Day is a great time to try the stick-to-your-ribs meat. "I suppose there is a mystique about them," says Andy Nelson Jr., the 46-year-old rib master at Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue in Cockeysville. Eating ribs, Nelson says, stimulates "different senses - sight, touch and taste.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | April 25, 1995
They were there to be with their coach, known by the distinctive name of Weeb since the day his young baby brother began to talk and couldn't say Wilbur. He made the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the basis of transforming two of the world's worst teams into world champions and winning classic games that created an indelible imprint on the records of the sport.Wilbur "Weeb" Ewbank was in the company of four of his former Baltimore Colts, the team that won what's referred to as the greatest game ever played, the sudden-death victory over the New York Giants in 1958.
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