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Andy Macphail

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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
June 20, 2007 - Orioles announce his hiring as president of baseball operations. The son of former Orioles general manager and Hall of Fame executive Lee MacPhail, Andy returns to the city where he lived as a boy from 1958 to 1965. Aug. 22, 2007 - Decides to remove interim tag from manager Dave Trembley, MacPhail's first noteworthy personnel move. After the news conference, the Orioles promptly lose the first game of a doubleheader, 30-3, to the Texas Rangers, the most lopsided defeat in club history.
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Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | September 30, 2014
Sorry, Oriole Magic fans, there was nothing supernatural about the way the club ran away from the rest of the American League East this year, even if it does defy logical explanation. They clinched the division title in surprisingly short order with one of baseball's best all-around catchers on the shelf for five months, their Platinum Glove third baseman recovering from another serious knee injury, and last year's most explosive major league hitter shockingly suspended for violating the sport's amphetamine policy.
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Peter Schmuck | June 19, 2012
Maybe it's a little early to start passing around the credit for the Orioles' surprising, uplifting and just plain fun first half of the 2012 season, but this could be a clear case of better early than never. The O's have exceeded expectations, and it's easy to point a couple of fingers in a couple of obvious directions. Buck Showalter clearly has changed the culture both on the field and in the clubhouse, so you can put a big gold star on his photo in the Orioles yearbook. New baseball operations guru Dan Duquette has made a couple of dynamic moves to upgrade the starting rotation, so his impact is easily measurable, even if he tried to acquire just about everybody with a pulse during the offseason.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Carol A. MacPhail, who had been an administrator and art teacher at Friends School and Bryn Mawr School, died Wednesday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 71. The daughter of Norbert Albert Witt, who had been president of Noxell, and Cecile R. Porter Witt, a homemaker, the former Carol Ann Witt was born in Detroit. She spent her early years in Evanston, Ill., and Greenwich, Conn., before moving to Homeland in 1954 with her family. She was a 1961 graduate of Friends School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1977 in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art . In 1989, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from the Johns Hopkins University.
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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
For the first four weeks of the season, Orioles hitters vowed that despite their poor offensive numbers, things would get better soon. They had better, or those hitters might not be around for much longer. Fed up with an offense that has scored two or fewer runs in 12 of 28 games, Andy MacPhail put the team's hitters on notice Wednesday in a rare public display of frustration for the Orioles' president of baseball operations. "While you can give them some allowance for the quality of pitching that we've faced, our patience isn't inexhaustible," MacPhail said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun before the Orioles' 7-5 loss to the New York Yankees on Wednesday.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Entering his second full season as the Orioles' president of baseball operations, Andy MacPhail has presided over a massive rebuilding project that has turned the 40-man roster over by more than 50 percent in one year alone. MacPhail, who is under contract with the Orioles through the 2011 season, recently discussed with The Baltimore Sun his relationship with team owner Peter Angelos, second baseman Brian Roberts' long-term status, the progress of top prospect Matt Wieters and other issues.
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By Kevin Cowherd | June 4, 2010
Go ahead and take your shots at Andy MacPhail today, Orioles fans. Use him like a punching bag. He's expecting it. Rip his vaunted rebuilding plan if you want. Slam him for running a team with the worst record in baseball, a team that took a major step backward the past two months with a core of promising young players who seem to have forgotten how to play the game. But know this: MacPhail, the team's president of baseball operations, seemed to be doing a good job of beating himself up Friday less than 14 hours after firing manager Dave Trembley.
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By RICK MAESE | June 22, 2007
Oh, Andy MacPhail, your words melt in our ears like ice cream on a summer sidewalk. You signed on this week to save the Orioles and instantly you cooed: "At the end of the day, the fans are the boss. They have the ultimate power. Something we all have to keep in mind, whether we're players or running baseball operations, they're customers and you have to treat them that way." You had 'em at hello, Andy. We all know you're busy scouring the country right now to find the right manager, and the guess here is that Joe Girardi's rejection hurt at least a little.
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
After more than a week of speculation since the end of the season, Andy MacPhail is indeed stepping down as the Orioles' president of baseball operations after four-plus years at the helm, according to a club source. MacPhail is leaving the Orioles to tend to family and personal obligations, the source said. UPDATE: The Orioles on Saturday announced MacPhail's departure in a news release. "On behalf of the Orioles organization, I thank Andy for his service to the club over the last four and a half seasons," Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | June 24, 2007
Long before he was a top executive with two world championship rings and a gleaming resume, Andy MacPhail was a Baltimore kid with baseball in his dreams and eye black streaked above his cheeks. He was a 5-year-old who wouldn't take off his Orioles pajamas, an 8-year-old who constantly dragged around his Jackie Brandt two-tone bat and a pre-teen always searching for a game, even if it was against the bigger, older boys. MacPhail, named last week as the Orioles' new president of baseball operations, may have been baseball royalty - his father and grandfather are Hall of Famers - but you wouldn't have known it by looking at the 1960s version.
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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
Andy MacPhail had been running the Orioles' baseball operations for eight months when he decided to inflict about as deep a wound as he could to his club's short-term fortunes. It's easy to forget now, but Erik Bedard was one of only a few true bright spots on the 2007 Orioles, a lefty with filthy stuff who had struck out 221 batters, third most in the league. And MacPhail wanted to trade him - felt he had to, really - even though Bedard was exactly the sort of present star that owner Peter Angelos had long been reluctant to exchange for future assets.
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Peter Schmuck | June 5, 2013
Depending on whether you're a glass-half-full kind of person or a negative nellie, it's possible to look at the Orioles position in this year's amatuer draft as a blessing or a curse. The Orioles are not picking in the top five for a change, which is both, considering it means they are now blessed with a good team that has accomplished something for the first time in forever and it also means that they are way down in the pecking order (or is that picking order) in this year's relatively soft draft.
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By Matt Vensel | April 9, 2013
Chris Davis was one of the hottest hitters in baseball in the first week of the season, though he has cooled off over the past couple of games. Still, his historic four-game start to the season probably prompted casual sports fans across the country to ask themselves, “Who is this Chris Davis guy and where did he come from?” Well, everyone here in Baltimore knows that the Orioles acquired him from the Texans Rangers before the trade deadline in 2011. But Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports has shared some interesting details from the deal . As it turns out, the Orioles more or less bought the slugging first baseman from the Rangers for $2 million.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
When Andy MacPhail wrestled with the idea of walking away from the Orioles as club president last fall, one of the primary factors in ultimately making the decision was the chance to spend more time with his elderly father. Lee MacPhail Jr., the Hall of Fame baseball executive, died Friday at age 95, roughly a year after Andy stepped down from the Orioles. Andy MacPhail told me last month he had no regrets in making the decision, and that he had been able to visit his father in Florida several times in 2012.
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By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Lee MacPhail, a Hall of Fame baseball executive who served as the Orioles' general manager from 1959 to 1965, died Thursday evening at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 95. Mr. MacPhail, who was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1998, represented the middle of a four-generation baseball dynasty. His father, Larry, was also a Hall of Fame executive. His son Andy became the Orioles' top baseball executive from 2007 to 2011 after serving in similar roles for the Minnesota Twins and Chicago Cubs.
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Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Lee MacPhail, a Hall of Fame baseball executive who served as Orioles general manager from 1959 to 1965, died Thursday evening at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 95. Mr. MacPhail, who was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1998, represented the middle of a four-generation baseball dynasty. His father, Larry, was also a Hall of Fame executive. His son, Andy, became the Orioles' top baseball executive from 2007 to 2011 after serving in similar roles for the Minnesota Twins and Chicago Cubs.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,JEFF ZREBIEC | August 22, 2008
In some baseball circles, Orioles president Andy MacPhail is viewed as financially conservative. He cut his baseball teeth with the perpetually small-market Minnesota Twins. Now, with the Orioles, he is knee-deep in a rebuilding effort that has already included dealing away two of his best players for 10 cheaper alternatives. He has also gone on record as saying, in most circumstances, he doesn't believe in giving big dollars to free-agent pitchers. Yet MacPhail doesn't fully buy his financially conservative tag. "Not necessarily.
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By The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Despite interviewing candidates Eric Wedge and Bobby Valentine earlier this week, there is no guarantee that the Orioles managerial search finishes before this season concludes, said club president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail . "I don't know how it is going to play out. We don't know how long it is going to go, too many variables," MacPhail said. "You just made an interim change and then you look at the landscape. I think it depends on your pool of candidates, where you are in the process, how comfortable you are with what your options are."
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Every offseason this happens. Sometimes it happens three, four, five times in the winter. A reporter attaches the Orioles to a star free agent's name. And then those of us who cover the team locally will get inundated with questions about whether the Orioles will land that player. Right now, it is Texas outfielder Josh Hamilton. After Fox Sports wrote Wednesday that the Orioles plan to pursue Hamilton, MLB Network did several minutes on whether Hamilton would be a fit in Baltimore.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
NEW YORK - Orioles manager Buck Showalter didn't know exactly what his New York counterpart, Yankees manager Joe Girardi , was going through Thursday after the death of Girardi's father became public. But Showalter, whose own dad passed away shortly after Showalter was named Yankees manager more than 20 years ago, empathized with Girardi's plight over the past few days. "Every situation is different like that. It's part of life, but you're never ready," Showalter said.
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