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By Ann Hornaday | December 26, 1999
You've seen "Man on the Moon." Now you can see the real Andy Kaufman riff again at the Charles Theatre in "My Breakfast With Blassie."Made in 1983 as a spoof on "My Dinner With Andre," the hourlong videoplay by Kaufman and Johnny Legend stars the last comic provocateur and wrestling champion Freddie Blassie having breakfast at a coffee shop. The two commiserate over celebrity, hygiene and wrestling. Then art and reality collide as Kaufman meets his future girlfriend on camera.Elements of "Blassie" have been massaged into "Man on the Moon," including a bit involving a fake piece of, um, nasal waste that Kaufman insists will be valuable someday.
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By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
The students could barely sit in their seats. This was it, what they'd been waiting for since they arrived at Annapolis High School and the rumor picked up steam, the rumor about their teacher, the one who teaches Dickens and poetry and makes them sing when they are late for class. "This is something we've all been looking forward to since freshman year," senior Katie Gorum said as she waited for the show to start yesterday afternoon. "Graduation is just a list of names. This is important."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 9, 1999
'Man on the Moon'Music From the Motion Picture (Warner Bros. 47483)Considering that director Milos Forman titled his biography of comic Andy Kaufman after R.E.M.'s Kaufman-inspired single, "Man on the Moon," it makes sense that the rock group would play a major musical role in the film. But "Man on the Moon: Music From the Motion Picture" is not quite the soundtrack fans expected.It isn't a mostly instrumental score in the manner of Ry Cooder's "Paris, Texas" or Eric Clapton's "Rush." Nor is it a quasi-pop album, with new songs inspired by a film, as was the case with Tom Petty's "She's the One" or Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | December 26, 1999
You've seen "Man on the Moon." Now you can see the real Andy Kaufman riff again at the Charles Theatre in "My Breakfast With Blassie."Made in 1983 as a spoof on "My Dinner With Andre," the hourlong videoplay by Kaufman and Johnny Legend stars the last comic provocateur and wrestling champion Freddie Blassie having breakfast at a coffee shop. The two commiserate over celebrity, hygiene and wrestling. Then art and reality collide as Kaufman meets his future girlfriend on camera.Elements of "Blassie" have been massaged into "Man on the Moon," including a bit involving a fake piece of, um, nasal waste that Kaufman insists will be valuable someday.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
The students could barely sit in their seats. This was it, what they'd been waiting for since they arrived at Annapolis High School and the rumor picked up steam, the rumor about their teacher, the one who teaches Dickens and poetry and makes them sing when they are late for class. "This is something we've all been looking forward to since freshman year," senior Katie Gorum said as she waited for the show to start yesterday afternoon. "Graduation is just a list of names. This is important."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
It's natural to wonder, "What the heck is going on here?" After all, Andy Kaufman is involved and any time the oddball comedian/performer/provocateur is involved you have to wonder.The latest stunt is a kind of resurrection. It's just the sort of prank you'd figure Kaufman would pull when all seemed lost, buried and largely forgotten.Kaufman -- of "Saturday Night Live" and "Taxi" fame -- soared into the American entertainment heavens, flamed out rather quickly and died young, leaving behind a core of devotees that included some big names in comedy.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1999
For one brief and insane moment Andy Kaufman is back in "Man on the Moon," Milos Forman's ecstatic homage to one of the greatest comedic provocateurs of his time. Disappearing entirely into a man of myriad personae but seemingly no core identity, Jim Carrey doesn't so much act here as inhabit a character who is comfortable only when he's bouncing off the walls of his own private hall of mirrors."Man on the Moon" is that rarity in this season of long, self-righteously tasteful literary adaptations: It's a movie that actually moves, whisking the audience on a funny, sad and extraordinary journey through a singularly compelling moment in American pop culture.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
Ice skating. Painting. Wrestling. Ax-murdering. Strutting across stages in skimpy costumes You'll find all sorts of interesting activities on TV tonight."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
It's women's night! ABC has juggled its schedule to temporarily highlight three sitcoms with funny female stars, and PBS launches a six-week series about women of considerably greater accomplishment.* "Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- A new episode in which Becky and Mark (Sarah Chalke and Glenn Quinn) move into a trailer park kicks off a triple-header women's run. It is followed by fresh episodes of "Ellen" (Ellen DeGeneres is jailed in an animal rights demonstration) and "Grace Under Fire" (Brett Butler goes to Graceland)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 24, 1999
Johnny Legend and Andy Kaufman were brothers under the skin, two people so like-minded, so in touch with the punk-camp-pre-post-modern zeitgeist that they were destined to be friends and collaborators. Legend, the shockabilly-musician-exploi- tation-impresario best known for penning the Freddie Blassie theme "Pencil Neck Geek" and for being the first man to win the Women's Wrestling Championship crown (sound familiar?), had been performing, wrestling and messing with people's minds for several years when he first crossed paths with Kaufman 20 years ago. "When I first heard about him and people started telling me about all the things he was doing, I just said, `Isn't everybody?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 24, 1999
Johnny Legend and Andy Kaufman were brothers under the skin, two people so like-minded, so in touch with the punk-camp-pre-post-modern zeitgeist that they were destined to be friends and collaborators. Legend, the shockabilly-musician-exploi- tation-impresario best known for penning the Freddie Blassie theme "Pencil Neck Geek" and for being the first man to win the Women's Wrestling Championship crown (sound familiar?), had been performing, wrestling and messing with people's minds for several years when he first crossed paths with Kaufman 20 years ago. "When I first heard about him and people started telling me about all the things he was doing, I just said, `Isn't everybody?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1999
For one brief and insane moment Andy Kaufman is back in "Man on the Moon," Milos Forman's ecstatic homage to one of the greatest comedic provocateurs of his time. Disappearing entirely into a man of myriad personae but seemingly no core identity, Jim Carrey doesn't so much act here as inhabit a character who is comfortable only when he's bouncing off the walls of his own private hall of mirrors."Man on the Moon" is that rarity in this season of long, self-righteously tasteful literary adaptations: It's a movie that actually moves, whisking the audience on a funny, sad and extraordinary journey through a singularly compelling moment in American pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
It's natural to wonder, "What the heck is going on here?" After all, Andy Kaufman is involved and any time the oddball comedian/performer/provocateur is involved you have to wonder.The latest stunt is a kind of resurrection. It's just the sort of prank you'd figure Kaufman would pull when all seemed lost, buried and largely forgotten.Kaufman -- of "Saturday Night Live" and "Taxi" fame -- soared into the American entertainment heavens, flamed out rather quickly and died young, leaving behind a core of devotees that included some big names in comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 9, 1999
'Man on the Moon'Music From the Motion Picture (Warner Bros. 47483)Considering that director Milos Forman titled his biography of comic Andy Kaufman after R.E.M.'s Kaufman-inspired single, "Man on the Moon," it makes sense that the rock group would play a major musical role in the film. But "Man on the Moon: Music From the Motion Picture" is not quite the soundtrack fans expected.It isn't a mostly instrumental score in the manner of Ry Cooder's "Paris, Texas" or Eric Clapton's "Rush." Nor is it a quasi-pop album, with new songs inspired by a film, as was the case with Tom Petty's "She's the One" or Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
Ice skating. Painting. Wrestling. Ax-murdering. Strutting across stages in skimpy costumes You'll find all sorts of interesting activities on TV tonight."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
It's women's night! ABC has juggled its schedule to temporarily highlight three sitcoms with funny female stars, and PBS launches a six-week series about women of considerably greater accomplishment.* "Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- A new episode in which Becky and Mark (Sarah Chalke and Glenn Quinn) move into a trailer park kicks off a triple-header women's run. It is followed by fresh episodes of "Ellen" (Ellen DeGeneres is jailed in an animal rights demonstration) and "Grace Under Fire" (Brett Butler goes to Graceland)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 7, 1994
Viewers who can't wait for "Scarlett" on CBS this weekend can tune in tonight to see NBC's "A Burning Passion: The Margaret Mitchell Story." This new TV biography of the "Gone With the Wind" author has much in common with the "Wind" sequel beginning Sunday. For example, neither one was written or approved by Mitchell herself. The highlight on the schedule, though, is Nickelodeon, where you should park and keep the meter running: It's an all-night marathon of "Taxi" episodes.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11)
FEATURES
October 14, 2005
THE QUESTION The biopic, long a Hollywood staple, is a form that is all over theaters these days, from last year's Oscar-winning Ray to new entries like The Greatest Game Ever Played, Good Night, and Good Luck (which opens today) and Capote (due later this month). The question: How much dramatic license should filmmakers be allowed in presenting these true-life stories? WHAT YOU SAY The filmmakers can take as much dramatic license as they wish provided that they find the truth and the core of the person or persons from the truelife story.
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