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NEWS
November 1, 2003
On October 30, 2003 ANNA LOUISE JOHNSON; beloved wife of John Andrew Johnson and devoted mother of Gregory Wayne Johnson, Sr. and his wife Carrie; grandmother of Gregory Wayne Johnson, Jr., John Andrew Johnson and Kelly Ann Johnson; great grandmother of Tiffany, Chelsea, Lindsay and Corey. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Road, on Saturday from 2 to 4 P.M. Services on Saturday at 4 P.M. at the funeral home.
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NEWS
November 1, 2003
On October 30, 2003 ANNA LOUISE JOHNSON; beloved wife of John Andrew Johnson and devoted mother of Gregory Wayne Johnson, Sr. and his wife Carrie; grandmother of Gregory Wayne Johnson, Jr., John Andrew Johnson and Kelly Ann Johnson; great grandmother of Tiffany, Chelsea, Lindsay and Corey. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Road, on Saturday from 2 to 4 P.M. Services on Saturday at 4 P.M. at the funeral home.
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NEWS
By Chuck Myers of Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 16, 1996
Q: How many presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected as the country's chief executive?A: Fifteen presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected to office. They are: John Quincy Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, Benjamin Harrison, Warren Harding, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.One president, James A. Garfield, was actually elected simultaneously as president of the United States and a senator from Ohio in 1880.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
Cramming 41 biographies into 10 hours of TV would be a mistake. Thankfully, PBS's "The American President" doesn't even try, opting instead to provide thumbnail sketches of the political philosophies and presidential accomplishments of the 41 men who have occupied the highest office in the land. Sure, the segments only skim the surface, and history buffs will probably hear little they don't already know. And while some segments seem distressingly brief -- with an average of only 15 minutes per president, how can you possibly sum up Washington, Lincoln or FDR?
NEWS
By Arthur Schlesinger Jr | December 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- What's it all about, this brawl in Washington? Some think it is about punishing an adulterous and mendacious president. Others think it is about protecting the democratic process against a vengeful attempt to undo a presidential election. Perhaps a historical perspective may have its uses -- not that historians are wiser than anybody else (they aren't), but they are more professionally inclined to look at the long-term impact on our constitutional order.The Framers reserved impeachment for officials charged with "Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
A crystal ball it's not.Even so, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, as reported in 1868 in The Baltimore Sun, reveals two things that are useful to know in the near certainty that Bill Clinton will follow him into history.First, much has changed in American political life: the quality of oratory, the things members of Congress regard as important.Much has not changed: Folly still has a hand in the proceedings.President Johnson's opponents at least could refer to major historic events in their recent past to lend gravity to their bombast, if not legitimacy to their charges.
NEWS
By KAROL V. MENZIE SUPER SCOUT: THIRTY-FIVE YEARS OF MAJOR LEAGUE SCOUTING. Jim Russo with Bob Hammel. Bonus Books. 222 pages. $19.95. and KAROL V. MENZIE SUPER SCOUT: THIRTY-FIVE YEARS OF MAJOR LEAGUE SCOUTING. Jim Russo with Bob Hammel. Bonus Books. 222 pages. $19.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1992
H . . . THE STORY OF HEATHCLIFF'S JOURNEY BACK TO WUTHERING HEIGHTS.Lin Haire-Sargeant.Pocket Books.304 pages. $20. It's a matter of debate if, however much readers want to read it and however much someone wants to write it, any author should ever attempt to complete the work of another. For the record, I think such efforts are doomed; they never have the fire of the original, and authors writing out of their own voices generally sound stilted and derivative.Having said that, I have also to say that Lin Haire-Sargeant's "H.," which "fills in" a three-year gap Emily Bronte left in the life of Heathcliff in "Wuthering Heights," very nearly topples such objections.
NEWS
By GERSON G. EISENBERG | August 1, 1991
Comparing the 40 individuals who have reached the presidency,one is struck less by what they have in common than by their differences.Consider education. George Washington, Zachary Taylor, Andrew Jackson, Millard Fillmore, Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson had no formal schooling, while Harry Truman had only a public-school education. This is hardly surprising considering the few centers of higher education in the earlier days of the republic.On the other hand, two-thirds of our presidents were college graduates or had some college education.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After extensive deliberations behind closed doors, Maryland's senators, both Democrats, voted to acquit the Democratic president of the impeachment charges. They claimed that he had been hounded by Republican critics whose motivation was political.The year was 1868 and the president was Andrew Johnson, Abraham Lincoln's hapless successor. The senators were Reverdy Johnson, an experienced Washington hand, and George Vickers, a Capitol Hill neophyte. And the underlying issue was the tension lingering after the Civil War.Both senators foreshadowed one of the key defenses mounted at President Clinton's impeachment trial -- that even if the charges were true, they were not serious enough to warrant his removal from office.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
Cramming 41 biographies into 10 hours of TV would be a mistake. Thankfully, PBS's "The American President" doesn't even try, opting instead to provide thumbnail sketches of the political philosophies and presidential accomplishments of the 41 men who have occupied the highest office in the land. Sure, the segments only skim the surface, and history buffs will probably hear little they don't already know. And while some segments seem distressingly brief -- with an average of only 15 minutes per president, how can you possibly sum up Washington, Lincoln or FDR?
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After extensive deliberations behind closed doors, Maryland's senators, both Democrats, voted to acquit the Democratic president of the impeachment charges. They claimed that he had been hounded by Republican critics whose motivation was political.The year was 1868 and the president was Andrew Johnson, Abraham Lincoln's hapless successor. The senators were Reverdy Johnson, an experienced Washington hand, and George Vickers, a Capitol Hill neophyte. And the underlying issue was the tension lingering after the Civil War.Both senators foreshadowed one of the key defenses mounted at President Clinton's impeachment trial -- that even if the charges were true, they were not serious enough to warrant his removal from office.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1999
"That said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, on the 21st day of February, 1868, unmindful of the high duties of his office, his oath of office and of the requirement of the Constitution that he should take care that the laws be faithfully executed, did unlawfully and in violation of the Constitution and laws of the U.S., frame an order in writing for the removal Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War ..."So read the first article of impeachment that led to the 1868 impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the first, and until this year the only, such trial of a president in U.S. history.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | January 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The story goes that when Thomas Jefferson and George Washington argued one morning about the future role of the U.S. Senate, Jefferson poured coffee from his cup into a saucer."
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
A crystal ball it's not.Even so, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, as reported in 1868 in The Baltimore Sun, reveals two things that are useful to know in the near certainty that Bill Clinton will follow him into history.First, much has changed in American political life: the quality of oratory, the things members of Congress regard as important.Much has not changed: Folly still has a hand in the proceedings.President Johnson's opponents at least could refer to major historic events in their recent past to lend gravity to their bombast, if not legitimacy to their charges.
NEWS
By Arthur Schlesinger Jr | December 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- What's it all about, this brawl in Washington? Some think it is about punishing an adulterous and mendacious president. Others think it is about protecting the democratic process against a vengeful attempt to undo a presidential election. Perhaps a historical perspective may have its uses -- not that historians are wiser than anybody else (they aren't), but they are more professionally inclined to look at the long-term impact on our constitutional order.The Framers reserved impeachment for officials charged with "Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."
NEWS
October 13, 1998
No evidence to back claim about Clinton inquiryAfter reading the title of your lead editorial ("Panel forges ahed, despite people's will," Oct. 6), I expected to see ample evidence to support that contention, that in fact the American people did not want the House Judiciary Committee to open an impeachment inquiry.That evidence was nowhere to be found. What I found instead was the all-too-familiar attempt by the Clinton apologists to shift attention to supposed wrongdoing by the devil incarnate, Kenneth Starr.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1999
"That said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, on the 21st day of February, 1868, unmindful of the high duties of his office, his oath of office and of the requirement of the Constitution that he should take care that the laws be faithfully executed, did unlawfully and in violation of the Constitution and laws of the U.S., frame an order in writing for the removal Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War ..."So read the first article of impeachment that led to the 1868 impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the first, and until this year the only, such trial of a president in U.S. history.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE @ GRAND INQUESTS: THE HISTORIC IMPEACHMENTS OF JUSTICE SAMUEL CHASE AND PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON. William H. Rehnquist. Morrow. 303 pages. $23. and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE @ GRAND INQUESTS: THE HISTORIC IMPEACHMENTS OF JUSTICE SAMUEL CHASE AND PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON. William H. Rehnquist. Morrow. 303 pages. $23.,LOS ANGELES TIMES TIGHT LINES. William G. Tapply. Delacorte. 277 pages. $18 | August 23, 1992
ALL THAT REMAINS.Patricia D. Cornwell.Scribners.373 pages. $20.Someone is stalking teen-age couples, killing them, and dumping their bodies deep in the woods of Virginia. By the time the remains are found, it's too late for Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Kay Scarpetta to determine the cause of death. "All that remains is his bones," she explains to the distraught father of one of the victims. "When soft tissue is gone, gone with it is any possible injury."When the Jeep of 19-year-old Deborah Harvey is discovered, abandoned at a highway rest stop outside Richmond, Kay fears that the Couple Killer has struck again.
NEWS
By Chuck Myers of Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 16, 1996
Q: How many presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected as the country's chief executive?A: Fifteen presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected to office. They are: John Quincy Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, Benjamin Harrison, Warren Harding, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.One president, James A. Garfield, was actually elected simultaneously as president of the United States and a senator from Ohio in 1880.
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