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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2002
TUPPER LAKE, N.Y. - The 1964 murder of Andrew Goodman in Mississippi prompted an aggressive investigation of the Ku Klux Klan and, decades later, inspired the movie Mississippi Burning. The killings of Goodman and two other young volunteers who were registering blacks to vote is viewed as a turning point in the civil rights movement. But Bill Frenette, the village historian here in Franklin County, fretted that even though Goodman's place in American history was secure, his ties to the northern Adirondacks could easily be forgotten.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
Josh Charles is a very competitive guy. But he's feeling absolutely no pressure to win as he arrives for his first Emmy Awards telecast as a nominee Sunday. "Someone asked me the other day, 'Are you super-nervous?' And I'm really not right now," says the former Baltimore School for the Arts student, who is vying for best supporting actor in a drama series on television. "I've been to the Emmys before, though I've never been individually nominated. But I'm really just going to enjoy myself.
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NEWS
November 10, 2002
Lawrence Andrew Rainey Sr., 79, the former county sheriff whose acquittal in the murders of three civil rights workers was chronicled in the movie Mississippi Burning, died Friday in Meridian, Miss. His wife said the cause was throat cancer. Neshoba County sheriff from 1963 to 1967, Mr. Rainey was charged with civil rights violations for allegedly conspiring to kill James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in 1964. Their bodies were found buried in an earthen dam a few miles from the church; the men had been beaten and shot.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - Testimony in the murder trial of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was put on hold yesterday when the 80-year-old was rushed to a hospital by ambulance, complaining of a "smothering sensation" in his chest. Doctors at Neshoba County General Hospital said they treated Killen for high blood pressure likely related to injuries he sustained in March when a tree he was cutting toppled on his head and broke both legs. Though Killen's condition is "not serious," he was to spend the night in the intensive care unit as a precaution, said Dr. Patrick Eakes, the internist who is overseeing Killen's care.
FEATURES
August 4, 2001
In 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were axed to death in their home in Fall River, Mass. Lizzie Borden, Andrew Borden's daughter from a previous marriage, was accused of the killings but was acquitted at trial. In 1914, Britain declared war on Germany while the United States proclaimed its neutrality. In 1944, Nazi police raided the secret annex of a building in Amsterdam and arrested eight people - including 15-year-old Anne Frank, whose diary became a famous account of the Holocaust. In 1964, the bodies of civil rights workers Michael H. Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James E. Chaney were found buried in an earthen dam in Mississippi.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - Testimony in the murder trial of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was put on hold yesterday when the 80-year-old was rushed to a hospital by ambulance, complaining of a "smothering sensation" in his chest. Doctors at Neshoba County General Hospital said they treated Killen for high blood pressure likely related to injuries he sustained in March when a tree he was cutting toppled on his head and broke both legs. Though Killen's condition is "not serious," he was to spend the night in the intensive care unit as a precaution, said Dr. Patrick Eakes, the internist who is overseeing Killen's care.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
Josh Charles is a very competitive guy. But he's feeling absolutely no pressure to win as he arrives for his first Emmy Awards telecast as a nominee Sunday. "Someone asked me the other day, 'Are you super-nervous?' And I'm really not right now," says the former Baltimore School for the Arts student, who is vying for best supporting actor in a drama series on television. "I've been to the Emmys before, though I've never been individually nominated. But I'm really just going to enjoy myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 10, 2000
Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Carol Weinberg returns to the festival this summer with a play grounded in the Civil Rights struggle. "Freedom Summer," which opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players, tells the story of a housewife from Queens, N.Y., whose commonplace existence is upset by the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, three young men who volunteered to register voters in Mississippi in 1964. Lynda McClary stars as the housewife, and Matthew Bowerman portrays Goodman.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
ATLANTA - Mississippi's attorney general has challenged a judge's decision to grant bail to former Ku Klux Klan member Edgar Ray Killen, who was freed from prison Friday, less than two months into his 60-year sentence. Killen was convicted in June of three counts of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. In an emergency petition to the state Supreme Court, submitted Monday night, Attorney General Jim Hood argued that Killen, 80, remains a violent and dangerous man. Hood said that a Killen relative made death threats against Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon and that an anonymous caller threatened to bomb the courthouse.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - The jury in the murder trial of Edgar Ray Killen told the judge yesterday it was deadlocked after less than three hours, setting the stage for further deliberations on the 41st anniversary of the killings of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. The jury of nine whites and three blacks deliberated until early evening before announcing to Judge Marcus Gordon that it was deadlocked 6-6 over the murder and manslaughter charges that the 80-year-old former Ku Klux Klan leader and Baptist preacher faces.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
Lawrence Andrew Rainey Sr., 79, the former county sheriff whose acquittal in the murders of three civil rights workers was chronicled in the movie Mississippi Burning, died Friday in Meridian, Miss. His wife said the cause was throat cancer. Neshoba County sheriff from 1963 to 1967, Mr. Rainey was charged with civil rights violations for allegedly conspiring to kill James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in 1964. Their bodies were found buried in an earthen dam a few miles from the church; the men had been beaten and shot.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2002
TUPPER LAKE, N.Y. - The 1964 murder of Andrew Goodman in Mississippi prompted an aggressive investigation of the Ku Klux Klan and, decades later, inspired the movie Mississippi Burning. The killings of Goodman and two other young volunteers who were registering blacks to vote is viewed as a turning point in the civil rights movement. But Bill Frenette, the village historian here in Franklin County, fretted that even though Goodman's place in American history was secure, his ties to the northern Adirondacks could easily be forgotten.
FEATURES
August 4, 2001
In 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were axed to death in their home in Fall River, Mass. Lizzie Borden, Andrew Borden's daughter from a previous marriage, was accused of the killings but was acquitted at trial. In 1914, Britain declared war on Germany while the United States proclaimed its neutrality. In 1944, Nazi police raided the secret annex of a building in Amsterdam and arrested eight people - including 15-year-old Anne Frank, whose diary became a famous account of the Holocaust. In 1964, the bodies of civil rights workers Michael H. Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James E. Chaney were found buried in an earthen dam in Mississippi.
NEWS
November 5, 2000
ONE OF THE OLD South's most notoriously racist states, Mississippi, is trying to rewrite a chapter of its lamentable history. Mississippi's attorney general, Mike Moore, wants to rebuild the state's image, to show that the new Mississippi is a place of civility and justice by bringing charges in the murders of James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, civil rights workers who were shot and buried in an earthen dam in 1964. His determination bears a sobering significance for every state and every citizen.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
IT'S A FORM of poetic justice that Edgar Ray Killen was convicted of manslaughter on the 41st anniversary of the deaths of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County, Miss. That it took the state four decades to seek justice of any kind against Mr. Killen or any of the other alleged Ku Klux Klansmen long known or thought to have been responsible for the killings shows the depth of the racial chasm in Mississippi. But the fact that, however belatedly, the state brought charges and a jury of nine whites and three blacks has found the 80-year-old ailing former preacher culpable in the murders also points to progress made in bridging the divide and the need to continue the process of reconciliation and healing - not only in Mississippi, but across the nation.
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