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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | September 16, 1997
Authorities have tightened security around U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo and his Washington offices after an anonymous caller reported to the American Civil Liberties Union in Baltimore that a contract had been taken out on Cuomo's life.The caller reported Wednesday that he had heard a contract had been taken out on Cuomo's life and that someone had planted a bomb in a courthouse in Baltimore, said Suzanne Smith, a legal assistant at the ACLU and an office spokeswoman.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 6, 2014
Much is being made of former President Bill Clinton's swearing-in of New York's new mayor, Bill de Blasio, with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at their side at City Hall. The cameo apparently sought to declare Democratic harmony in Gotham, that supposed bastion of liberalism. In a sense, it was a gathering of the Clinton political clan. Mr. De Blasio was a one-time subordinate at the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Clinton administration under then-Secretary Andrew Cuomo, son of former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, himself a liberal icon.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | September 5, 2012
As Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley took the stage at the Democratic National Convention last night, pundits in the audience dug out their smart phones and provided insta-analysis on Twitter. The feedback was not entirely positive. Some of the criticism undoubtedly stems from high expectations and reinforces the important role that O'Malley is playing in national politics. When he is talking, opinion-makers are paying attention.  In this case, perhaps he wished they were not. Josh Greenman , a New York Daily News opinion editor, tweeted that the Democrats had "solid night" but added "with the exception of O'Malley.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
By the time Gov. Martin O'Malley left the Democratic convention last fall, he had schmoozed with party leaders from Iowa, spoken to potential donors and hosted swanky parties that kept delegates entertained into the next morning — efforts that heightened speculation about his ambitions beyond Maryland. But another governor on the short list of potential 2016 presidential candidates, New York's Andrew Cuomo, took an entirely different approach: He arrived in Charlotte two days late, spoke for 20 minutes to his state delegation and went home.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Polling on the 2016 presidential contest has already started, and Gov. Martin O'Malley has jumped out to a better-than 2-to-1 lead -- over last place finisher Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer. That's if Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden don't run. The Huffington Post reported that a PPP poll puts O'Malley at 5 percent support among Democrats in a Clinton-less, Biden-less race. That's far behind the 21 percent for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and 16 percent for Massachusetts Sen.-elect Elizabeth Warren and modestly trailing Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick's 8 percent but ahead of Virginia Sen. Mark Warner's 3 percent and Schweitzer's 2 percent.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 27, 2011
Given his role in New York's legalization of same-sex marriage, Andrew Cuomo might be the most celebrated governor in the United States at the moment. But watch out: Martin O'Malley, the governor of Maryland, has taken up his guitar to play with his band again, if only to show us he's not just a boring and cautious, middling politician with presidential ambitions. Here's how reporter John Wagner put it three days ago in The Washington Post: "Instead of seeing his music as a liability, many around him have come to view it as a healthy, humanizing outlet for O'Malley, who, if anything, has grown a little stiff since moving to Annapolis in 2007.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's coordinated legislative strategy to hold off a vote on homosexual marriage until he could corrupt Republican state Senators James Alesi, Roy McDonald, Stephen Saland, and Mark Grisanti needs further scrutiny by legal authorities. Governor Cuomo and his immoral pals effectively sold New Yorkers down the river by forcing through same-sex marriage, which most New Yorkers and Americans do not want. Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio of Brooklyn recently said the vote was typical of the "corrupt political process in New York state.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 29, 1991
On the subway one morning recently, Mike Davis started his own Cuomo For President movement.He was struck by a newspaper story reporting that Andrew Cuomo, son of New York Governor Mario Cuomo, was urging his father to run for president.Mr. Davis decided to give Andrew Cuomo a hand.Within days, he had a petition with 600 names on it headed toward the State House in Albany."If there were space," said a letter accompanying the signatures, "we would recount the hopes and fears expressed by those who have signed this petition.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 6, 2014
Much is being made of former President Bill Clinton's swearing-in of New York's new mayor, Bill de Blasio, with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at their side at City Hall. The cameo apparently sought to declare Democratic harmony in Gotham, that supposed bastion of liberalism. In a sense, it was a gathering of the Clinton political clan. Mr. De Blasio was a one-time subordinate at the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Clinton administration under then-Secretary Andrew Cuomo, son of former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, himself a liberal icon.
FEATURES
By TINA DAUNT and TINA DAUNT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- Guess who's been making the political rounds in Hollywood recently? Not just Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, though she's made two major fundraising trips to Los Angeles in the past six months. Or Al Gore. (Though he's a frequent visitor.) Try Sen. John Kerry. Followed by Howard Dean. Followed by Sen. John McCain. And this week, it's Andrew Cuomo (2016, anyone?), before Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. drops by. Los Angeles has been humming along in one of its favorite roles: early-bird talent scout looking over a steady parade of politicians here to court Hollywood's most influential Democratic fundraisers.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
- Gov. Martin O'Malley took the stage Saturday at a high school in this early presidential primary state, telling an auditorium of South Carolina Democrats that his principles worked in Maryland - and they'd work elsewhere. "We're investing more to improve public education, to hold down college tuition, to spur innovation and job creation," O'Malley said to a crowd of 150 party faithful. But he also said Maryland has "cut state spending big time," casting himself as a pragmatist who makes tough choices.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | December 13, 2012
Shortly after the 1988 presidential election, pollsters asked Democrats whom they favored to be their party's nominee in 1992. The strongest candidates were Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York. The governor of Arkansas, Bill Clinton, didn't even register. Eight years ago, after another election, the pollsters tried again. The front-runners for the 2008 Democratic nomination, they found, were Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and John F. Kerry. The newly elected senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, wasn't on the list.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Polling on the 2016 presidential contest has already started, and Gov. Martin O'Malley has jumped out to a better-than 2-to-1 lead -- over last place finisher Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer. That's if Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden don't run. The Huffington Post reported that a PPP poll puts O'Malley at 5 percent support among Democrats in a Clinton-less, Biden-less race. That's far behind the 21 percent for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and 16 percent for Massachusetts Sen.-elect Elizabeth Warren and modestly trailing Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick's 8 percent but ahead of Virginia Sen. Mark Warner's 3 percent and Schweitzer's 2 percent.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | September 5, 2012
As Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley took the stage at the Democratic National Convention last night, pundits in the audience dug out their smart phones and provided insta-analysis on Twitter. The feedback was not entirely positive. Some of the criticism undoubtedly stems from high expectations and reinforces the important role that O'Malley is playing in national politics. When he is talking, opinion-makers are paying attention.  In this case, perhaps he wished they were not. Josh Greenman , a New York Daily News opinion editor, tweeted that the Democrats had "solid night" but added "with the exception of O'Malley.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's coordinated legislative strategy to hold off a vote on homosexual marriage until he could corrupt Republican state Senators James Alesi, Roy McDonald, Stephen Saland, and Mark Grisanti needs further scrutiny by legal authorities. Governor Cuomo and his immoral pals effectively sold New Yorkers down the river by forcing through same-sex marriage, which most New Yorkers and Americans do not want. Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio of Brooklyn recently said the vote was typical of the "corrupt political process in New York state.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 27, 2011
Given his role in New York's legalization of same-sex marriage, Andrew Cuomo might be the most celebrated governor in the United States at the moment. But watch out: Martin O'Malley, the governor of Maryland, has taken up his guitar to play with his band again, if only to show us he's not just a boring and cautious, middling politician with presidential ambitions. Here's how reporter John Wagner put it three days ago in The Washington Post: "Instead of seeing his music as a liability, many around him have come to view it as a healthy, humanizing outlet for O'Malley, who, if anything, has grown a little stiff since moving to Annapolis in 2007.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | December 13, 2012
Shortly after the 1988 presidential election, pollsters asked Democrats whom they favored to be their party's nominee in 1992. The strongest candidates were Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York. The governor of Arkansas, Bill Clinton, didn't even register. Eight years ago, after another election, the pollsters tried again. The front-runners for the 2008 Democratic nomination, they found, were Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and John F. Kerry. The newly elected senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, wasn't on the list.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
- Gov. Martin O'Malley took the stage Saturday at a high school in this early presidential primary state, telling an auditorium of South Carolina Democrats that his principles worked in Maryland - and they'd work elsewhere. "We're investing more to improve public education, to hold down college tuition, to spur innovation and job creation," O'Malley said to a crowd of 150 party faithful. But he also said Maryland has "cut state spending big time," casting himself as a pragmatist who makes tough choices.
FEATURES
By TINA DAUNT and TINA DAUNT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- Guess who's been making the political rounds in Hollywood recently? Not just Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, though she's made two major fundraising trips to Los Angeles in the past six months. Or Al Gore. (Though he's a frequent visitor.) Try Sen. John Kerry. Followed by Howard Dean. Followed by Sen. John McCain. And this week, it's Andrew Cuomo (2016, anyone?), before Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. drops by. Los Angeles has been humming along in one of its favorite roles: early-bird talent scout looking over a steady parade of politicians here to court Hollywood's most influential Democratic fundraisers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | September 16, 1997
Authorities have tightened security around U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo and his Washington offices after an anonymous caller reported to the American Civil Liberties Union in Baltimore that a contract had been taken out on Cuomo's life.The caller reported Wednesday that he had heard a contract had been taken out on Cuomo's life and that someone had planted a bomb in a courthouse in Baltimore, said Suzanne Smith, a legal assistant at the ACLU and an office spokeswoman.
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