Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAndrea Gail
IN THE NEWS

Andrea Gail

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
She is the perfect boat for "The Perfect Storm." Sixteen months ago, Lady Grace was just one of the commercial fishing boats at anchor in Ocean City Harbor. Next Friday, she'll appear on movie screens across the country as the Andrea Gail, the Gloucester, Mass., swordfish boat that sank in the North Atlantic during a horrific storm, taking six crewmen to their deaths. "She's as close to the Andrea Gail as you can get," says Doug Merrifield, the film's marine coordinator, who helped transform the best-selling book by Sebastian Junger into what Warner Bros.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The movie didn't have a happy ending, but the boat that portrayed the ill-fated Andrea Gail in "The Perfect Storm" will get one. Lady Grace, a commercial fishing boat from Ocean City, has been sold to Legal Sea Foods of Boston for $145,100. "I read the book. I saw the movie. We used to purchase a lot of fish off the Andrea Gail," says Roger Berkowitz, chief executive of the restaurant chain. Berkowitz bought the boat Friday from Warner Bros. Pictures through the on-line auction house eBay.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The movie didn't have a happy ending, but the boat that portrayed the ill-fated Andrea Gail in "The Perfect Storm" will get one. Lady Grace, a commercial fishing boat from Ocean City, has been sold to Legal Sea Foods of Boston for $145,100. "I read the book. I saw the movie. We used to purchase a lot of fish off the Andrea Gail," says Roger Berkowitz, chief executive of the restaurant chain. Berkowitz bought the boat Friday from Warner Bros. Pictures through the on-line auction house eBay.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | July 7, 2000
SEATTLE - The film "The Perfect Storm" is about six men who die at sea, but despite the tragic outcome, Cliff Mass could not stop chuckling. Realistic as the film is supposed to be, the University of Washington meteorologist found it downright laughable. He laughed at its spectacular satellite image of a hurricane, stretched across the cinema screen. He laughed at the movie's depiction of the massive rogue wave that smashed into the fishing boat Andrea Gail in October 1991 in the North Atlantic, leaving its crew dazed and bleeding.
NEWS
By Jim Shea and Jim Shea,Hartford Courant | August 3, 1997
"The Perfect Storm," by Sebastian Junger. Norton. 227pages. $23.95.In October 1991, a powerful nor'easter out of Canada merged with, and was further energized by, the remnants of a hurricane out of the tropics. The marriage produced 100 mph winds and waves the height of a 10-story building.Unfortunately, the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat out of Gloucester, Mass., found itself on the short end of these long odds and was lost, along with all aboard, off the coast of Nova Scotia.While weather of such fury, and tragedy of such magnitude, are awash with story potential, it is the skillful telling of this tale that makes "The Perfect Storm" so compelling.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 2000
Greed and need, hubris and human frailty, superstition and hard science, destiny and dumb luck - all played crucial roles in Sebastian Junger's book "The Perfect Storm," the true story of the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat that sank in 1991 in a freak storm at sea. And all are evoked with technical skill and subtlety in the movie version of a story as gripping and tragic as anything a screenwriter could conjure. "The Perfect Storm" is that rare popcorn movie that pulls filmgoers to the edge of their seats and blows their hair back, but never sacrifices the human element to action.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Sebastian Junger used to measure the cost of everything in tree work.As a tree trimmer -- a "high climber" in his parlance -- he could earn as much as $1,000 a day. Even the smallest job paid at least $200. So the health insurance policy he bought for himself, that was $900, or about a day of tree work. The deductible was $2,000 -- two days of tree work, and it proved to be a real bargain in 1991, the year he broke his right hand, then cut his calf while on the job.It's hard for a right-hander to get the back of the left leg. But Junger had reached behind himself one-handed and lost control of the chain saw, which was revving at 500 mph. (That's the kind of detail Junger loves, that 500 mph part.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | July 7, 2000
SEATTLE - The film "The Perfect Storm" is about six men who die at sea, but despite the tragic outcome, Cliff Mass could not stop chuckling. Realistic as the film is supposed to be, the University of Washington meteorologist found it downright laughable. He laughed at its spectacular satellite image of a hurricane, stretched across the cinema screen. He laughed at the movie's depiction of the massive rogue wave that smashed into the fishing boat Andrea Gail in October 1991 in the North Atlantic, leaving its crew dazed and bleeding.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
When Cmdr. James Joseph "J.J." O'Connor left a North Carolina air station nine years ago piloting an HC-130 helicopter, he knew a boat was in trouble. Unknown to the 28-year-old Coast Guard officer was that the two-hour flight up the East Coast would take him into the heart of one of the strongest - and now one of the more infamous - storms in recorded history. By the time O'Connor reached the churning waters of the North Atlantic on Halloween night of 1991, the storm had sunk the Andrea Gail, a Gloucester, Mass.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,Dave.Rosenthal@baltsun.com | May 31, 2009
With summer upon us, it's time to start assembling a list of the Best Dirty Books. Not that kind of dirty. I mean books meant to be read outdoors because they carry a whiff of salt spray or the grit of a sandy beach. For me, they're the perfect read for a summer vacation. Here are a few classics that meet the standard. If you have other recommendations, let me know in an e-mail or in a comment on Read Street. Dune. Frank Herbert's science fiction tale, which started a trilogy and led to several lesser works by other authors, takes place on a planet covered by sand.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 2000
Greed and need, hubris and human frailty, superstition and hard science, destiny and dumb luck - all played crucial roles in Sebastian Junger's book "The Perfect Storm," the true story of the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat that sank in 1991 in a freak storm at sea. And all are evoked with technical skill and subtlety in the movie version of a story as gripping and tragic as anything a screenwriter could conjure. "The Perfect Storm" is that rare popcorn movie that pulls filmgoers to the edge of their seats and blows their hair back, but never sacrifices the human element to action.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
She is the perfect boat for "The Perfect Storm." Sixteen months ago, Lady Grace was just one of the commercial fishing boats at anchor in Ocean City Harbor. Next Friday, she'll appear on movie screens across the country as the Andrea Gail, the Gloucester, Mass., swordfish boat that sank in the North Atlantic during a horrific storm, taking six crewmen to their deaths. "She's as close to the Andrea Gail as you can get," says Doug Merrifield, the film's marine coordinator, who helped transform the best-selling book by Sebastian Junger into what Warner Bros.
NEWS
By Jim Shea and Jim Shea,Hartford Courant | August 3, 1997
"The Perfect Storm," by Sebastian Junger. Norton. 227pages. $23.95.In October 1991, a powerful nor'easter out of Canada merged with, and was further energized by, the remnants of a hurricane out of the tropics. The marriage produced 100 mph winds and waves the height of a 10-story building.Unfortunately, the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat out of Gloucester, Mass., found itself on the short end of these long odds and was lost, along with all aboard, off the coast of Nova Scotia.While weather of such fury, and tragedy of such magnitude, are awash with story potential, it is the skillful telling of this tale that makes "The Perfect Storm" so compelling.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Sebastian Junger used to measure the cost of everything in tree work.As a tree trimmer -- a "high climber" in his parlance -- he could earn as much as $1,000 a day. Even the smallest job paid at least $200. So the health insurance policy he bought for himself, that was $900, or about a day of tree work. The deductible was $2,000 -- two days of tree work, and it proved to be a real bargain in 1991, the year he broke his right hand, then cut his calf while on the job.It's hard for a right-hander to get the back of the left leg. But Junger had reached behind himself one-handed and lost control of the chain saw, which was revving at 500 mph. (That's the kind of detail Junger loves, that 500 mph part.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
GLOUCESTER, Mass. -- Here at the Crow's Nest, they are missing a golden opportunity to become a tourist attraction. That doesn't seem to bother them much. A national spotlight has been on this Main Street bar ever since "The Perfect Storm," a best-selling book set in Gloucester, hit shelves in 1997. Throngs of vacationers arrive and head straight for the visitors center to ask where they can find the Crow's Nest. But the Crow's Nest never really wanted to be "found." And it hasn't done much to capitalize on this wave of interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 16, 2000
You've seen "The Perfect Storm." Maybe you even read it. But have you heard it? I mean, really listened? The wave-tossed blockbuster has been captivating audiences with its awesome visual effects. With heart-stopping scale, the film shows the massive storm system that ambushed the swordfish boat Andrea Gail and killed its crew of six men off the coast of Massachusetts in 1991. Much has been written about the meticulous detail demanded by director Wolfgang Petersen ("Das Boot," "Air Force One")
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.