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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
The Andrea Doria, once the pride of the postwar Italian merchant marine, lies in the mud on its starboard side, 250 feet down in dark and cold Atlantic waters 50 miles south of Nantucket. The ocean liner's fate was sealed when it collided with the Stockholm of the Swedish American Line on July 25, 1956. The next morning, the mortally wounded Andrea Doria slowly slipped beneath the waves, its death throes recorded for posterity by reporters in airplanes and on nearby rescue vessels. Fifty-two people lost their lives, but a heroic rescue effort saved 1,660 passengers, crew and officers, including captain Pierre Calamai.
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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
A large envelope of newspaper clippings arrived this week from Baltimore friends vacationing on Nantucket who are aware of my interest in shipwrecks. Inside were special sections, both excellent, produced by the island's two weekly newspapers, The Inquirer and Mirror and The Nantucket Independent. The sections recall the loss of the Andrea Doria, which sank 50 years ago when it collided with the Swedish liner Stockholm about 50 miles southeast of the island. Late on the evening of July 24, 1956, first-class passengers aboard the Italian Line's 697-foot-long Andrea Doria, were sipping nightcaps and slowly dancing to another rendition of "Arriverderci, Roma" by the ship's orchestra before they retired for the evening.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 1998
HACKENSACK, N.J. - To an elite cast of New Jersey adventurers who spend their weekends scouring the sunken remains of shipwrecks on the Atlantic's murky floor, the Andrea Doria beckons.The obstacles to reaching the ill-fated vessel, which sank 42 years ago off Nantucket, Mass., are daunting: bone-chilling temperatures, ferocious currents, clouds of silt that swallow all light and the crushing pressures that bear down under 24 stories of dark ocean.Wreck diving, like any extreme sport, is recreation turned obsession.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
Shoppers and the just plain curious must wonder how a former sea-scarred Coast Guard vessel - often confused with a cutter- has come to rest in a forlorn weed-grown corner of Port Covington. For the last 18 months or so, the USCG Tamaroa, a 205-foot former 1,600-ton Navy salvage tug has been tied up behind the Sam's Club and Wal-Mart now occupying the former heavy industrial site. During its 61 years afloat, the stout-hearted vessel, which served both in the Atlantic and Pacific, compiled an impressive record.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | April 27, 1997
The "miracle girl" of the Andrea Doria tragedy, Linda Morgan, is today the chief curator of the highly respected private McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas.Now Linda Hardberger, she has developed an expertise in theater arts in her 13 years there. For seven years before that, she worked at the San Antonio Art Museum.The loss of two family members and serious injuries of her mother and herself resulted in her declining interviews about the tragic night in 1956, said her husband, Phil Hardberger, chief judge of the Fourth Circuit, Texas Court of Appeals, in San Antonio.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Ruth Roman, the former sultry star of stage, screen and television who died this month at her California home, found herself caught up in a real-life drama when the grand ocean liner the Andrea Doria collided with the Stockholm off Nantucket, Mass., on July 25, 1956.Roman was returning to New York from Italy aboard the Andrea Doria with her 3 1/2-year-old son, Dickie Hall, and a nurse-companion, Grace Els.While her young son slept in cabin 82 on the Andrea Doria's upper deck with Els, Roman, dressed in an evening gown, had gone to the ship's Belvedere Lounge for a drink and to mingle with other passengers.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 27, 1997
A famous ship dripping with irony slipped quietly in and out of Baltimore on Monday in its maiden voyage here.The visitor for less than a day at Pier 5, Dundalk Marine Terminal, was a 15,000-gross- ton passenger vessel called Italia Prima, meaning "Italy First."The ship was in the last stages of an around-the-world tour that began Dec. 21 in Genoa, Italy. Genoa was the home port of Christopher Columbus and another famous 16th-century Italian sailor, Andrea Doria, who won the city freedom from the Spanish.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
A large envelope of newspaper clippings arrived this week from Baltimore friends vacationing on Nantucket who are aware of my interest in shipwrecks. Inside were special sections, both excellent, produced by the island's two weekly newspapers, The Inquirer and Mirror and The Nantucket Independent. The sections recall the loss of the Andrea Doria, which sank 50 years ago when it collided with the Swedish liner Stockholm about 50 miles southeast of the island. Late on the evening of July 24, 1956, first-class passengers aboard the Italian Line's 697-foot-long Andrea Doria, were sipping nightcaps and slowly dancing to another rendition of "Arriverderci, Roma" by the ship's orchestra before they retired for the evening.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Their memories are haunting.Ellen Dean was a passenger on the luxury ocean liner Andrea Doria in 1956 when it collided with another ship and sank. Paula Weinstein was a 5-year-old in 1939 when German planes bombed her Polish village.Both survived to raise families in the Baltimore area. But as the years have passed, they wanted their stories to be remembered, especially by their children and grandchildren.Now, they will.To capture such moments, the Baltimore County Department of Aging sponsored its first writing contest recently.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
Shoppers and the just plain curious must wonder how a former sea-scarred Coast Guard vessel - often confused with a cutter- has come to rest in a forlorn weed-grown corner of Port Covington. For the last 18 months or so, the USCG Tamaroa, a 205-foot former 1,600-ton Navy salvage tug has been tied up behind the Sam's Club and Wal-Mart now occupying the former heavy industrial site. During its 61 years afloat, the stout-hearted vessel, which served both in the Atlantic and Pacific, compiled an impressive record.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
The Andrea Doria, once the pride of the postwar Italian merchant marine, lies in the mud on its starboard side, 250 feet down in dark and cold Atlantic waters 50 miles south of Nantucket. The ocean liner's fate was sealed when it collided with the Stockholm of the Swedish American Line on July 25, 1956. The next morning, the mortally wounded Andrea Doria slowly slipped beneath the waves, its death throes recorded for posterity by reporters in airplanes and on nearby rescue vessels. Fifty-two people lost their lives, but a heroic rescue effort saved 1,660 passengers, crew and officers, including captain Pierre Calamai.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Ruth Roman, the former sultry star of stage, screen and television who died this month at her California home, found herself caught up in a real-life drama when the grand ocean liner the Andrea Doria collided with the Stockholm off Nantucket, Mass., on July 25, 1956.Roman was returning to New York from Italy aboard the Andrea Doria with her 3 1/2-year-old son, Dickie Hall, and a nurse-companion, Grace Els.While her young son slept in cabin 82 on the Andrea Doria's upper deck with Els, Roman, dressed in an evening gown, had gone to the ship's Belvedere Lounge for a drink and to mingle with other passengers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 1998
HACKENSACK, N.J. - To an elite cast of New Jersey adventurers who spend their weekends scouring the sunken remains of shipwrecks on the Atlantic's murky floor, the Andrea Doria beckons.The obstacles to reaching the ill-fated vessel, which sank 42 years ago off Nantucket, Mass., are daunting: bone-chilling temperatures, ferocious currents, clouds of silt that swallow all light and the crushing pressures that bear down under 24 stories of dark ocean.Wreck diving, like any extreme sport, is recreation turned obsession.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 27, 1997
A famous ship dripping with irony slipped quietly in and out of Baltimore on Monday in its maiden voyage here.The visitor for less than a day at Pier 5, Dundalk Marine Terminal, was a 15,000-gross- ton passenger vessel called Italia Prima, meaning "Italy First."The ship was in the last stages of an around-the-world tour that began Dec. 21 in Genoa, Italy. Genoa was the home port of Christopher Columbus and another famous 16th-century Italian sailor, Andrea Doria, who won the city freedom from the Spanish.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | April 27, 1997
The "miracle girl" of the Andrea Doria tragedy, Linda Morgan, is today the chief curator of the highly respected private McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas.Now Linda Hardberger, she has developed an expertise in theater arts in her 13 years there. For seven years before that, she worked at the San Antonio Art Museum.The loss of two family members and serious injuries of her mother and herself resulted in her declining interviews about the tragic night in 1956, said her husband, Phil Hardberger, chief judge of the Fourth Circuit, Texas Court of Appeals, in San Antonio.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Their memories are haunting.Ellen Dean was a passenger on the luxury ocean liner Andrea Doria in 1956 when it collided with another ship and sank. Paula Weinstein was a 5-year-old in 1939 when German planes bombed her Polish village.Both survived to raise families in the Baltimore area. But as the years have passed, they wanted their stories to be remembered, especially by their children and grandchildren.Now, they will.To capture such moments, the Baltimore County Department of Aging sponsored its first writing contest recently.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
On September 5, 2004, MIHOVIL "Mike" of Baltimore, a retired New York City Longshoreman who worked on some of the great ocean liners, such as the Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth, Andrea Doria, SS United States and Ile de France during the heyday of trans- Atlantic travel, devoted father of Marija "Mary" Poling, Nevenka "Nancy" Propf and Michael Radov; father-in-law of Ike Poling and Jack Propf; grandfather of Larry Propf, Michael Poling and Jennifer Ward...
NEWS
October 17, 2005
Philip Robbins, a retired journalism teacher and former Evening Sun reporter, died of pancreatic cancer Thursday at his Elkton home. The former Northwood resident was 74. Born in Hickman, Ky., he received a bachelor's degree from Washington and Lee University and then served in the Army as a sergeant during the Korean War. He then received a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. In 1955 he joined The Evening Sun and was a general assignment reporter. He was later a maritime reporter.
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