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By Dale Curry | February 16, 1994
* Chaurice: A fresh Creole hot sausage usually made with chili powder, red, white and black peppers, salt and other seasonings, chaurice is popular for po-boys or grilled and served as hors d'oeuvres. Some versions are simply fresh pork sausage with lots of pepper. It is also used to flavor red beans, jambalaya and cooked greens.* Italian sausage: Popular in New Orleans, Italian sausage has various seasonings but is usually a fresh pork sausage flavored with peppers and anise seed or fennel.
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By Donna Ellis | October 1, 2012
Unless you have the family on a no-carb diet – and we know how that fad has died out – you probably spend some meal-planning energy on carb-y side dishes to go with protein sources and vegetables. Potatoes, pasta, rice, grains are among the choices. And among the grain-y options we tend to forget are grits. That's right. Grits. The South's answer to Italian polenta. Since we do, in essence, live in the South, you've probably tried had grits for breakfast, but few of us consider fixing them for supper.
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By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 14, 1999
Let the good times roll with a Mardi Gras dish that leaves the cook free to two-step instead of standing guard in the kitchen. This chicken and Cajun sausage jambalaya can be made ahead, whenever it's convenient. A quick trip to the store for French bread, pecan pralines or pecan ice cream, and chicory coffee rounds out the preparation for this supper of Louisiana favorites.Andouille (pronounced awn- DWEE) is a heavily smoked, coarsely ground, spicy Cajun sausage. Outside of Louisiana, it is available in specialty-food stores and through mail-order and online sources.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | February 13, 2012
The football season is over. So is Groundhog Day. And Valentine's Day, too. But if any excuse for a party will do, don't forget that Mardi Gras is Tuesday, Feb. 21. And while it may be a little late to book your trip to the Big Easy, you can at least get a taste of it at our local Copeland's of New Orleans. The eatery took up residence in Columbia about 11 years ago and still draws its share of fun-loving folks who enjoy contemporary versions of regional Creole/Cajun fare, as well as more American food, like burgers.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 25, 2004
By starting with a very hot skillet (cast-iron is best for this), you can speed up the baking of this simple Southern dish. The pudding is similar to spoon bread and is quite filling, so you'll need only to add a vegetable and salad to make a complete meal. We've suggested andouille sausage here, but any of your favorite sausages can be used, including plain old breakfast sausages. Tips Make sure the oven is heated fully to 425 degrees. Make sure to heat the oil in the skillet almost to the smoking stage before adding the batter.
FEATURES
By Dale Curry and Dale Curry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 16, 1994
Not a decade ago, Louisiana sausages were regional treats, the Cajuns snacking on hot boudin, cooks along the river seasoning their gumbos with andouille from a few local butchers, and New Orleanians sandwiching their hot, smoked and Italian sausages in French bread.Today, andouille is a household word in California and might just as easily be heard in Baltimore or Kansas. Boudin, too, has reached the masses, and sausages generally have gotten hotter and more highly seasoned nationwide as part of the fallout of the Cajun craze of the '80s.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Magnolias: Authentic Southern Cuisine By Donald Barickman The Boathouse Tales and Recipes From a Southern Kitchen By Douglas W. Bostick and Jason R. Davidson Joggling Board Press / 2006 / $26.95 More history than kitchen guide, this attractive cookbook tells the story of the Carolinas through food. Arresting photographs - only a small portion of which are actually of the finished dishes - are displayed next to stories about how ingredients such as asparagus and okra made their way to the region.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 1, 1998
Few restaurants in Baltimore have appeared with the fanfare Charleston has. By the time the former operators of Savannah opened their own restaurant in December, numerous news stories had trumpeted its arrival. Chef Cindy Wolf and her husband, Tony Foreman, hired a public relations firm and held a grand opening that half the city of Baltimore attended.The problem with creating such high expectations, of course, is that then you have to live up to them. And new restaurants almost always have glitches.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 6, 1997
When Bandaloops opened 10 years ago it was, as a restaurant critic said at the time, "maddeningly trendy." With its cute name taken from a Tom Robbins novel and dishes like "Chicken Bingo Pajama" and "Kama Sutra Strata," you had to wonder how this glorified fern bar would ever survive in Federal Hill, which has a certain tough practicality under that yuppie exterior.But survive Bandaloops did, getting rid of most of the literary allusions and arch menu descriptions in the process. Even the food is a little more down to earth these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1998
It isn't hard to imagine horses clopping along the hilly streets of historic Ellicott City. What is hard to imagine is that they were ever kept in what is now the handsome Mill Towne Tavern.This former stable has been transformed into an inviting restaurant with warm, clubby dining rooms on two levels. Before the restaurant opened last June, owner Keith Curtiss and landlord Pete Ruff renovated the sprawling condemned building on Old Columbia Pike and won some awards in the process.It's easy to see why. Inside, there's no sense of the building's rustic past, except for the rough granite walls, where folk-art paintings are hung in heavy gilt frames.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
When I went back to check, I was surprised to find out that it's been nine years since I last reviewed Sascha's 527 Cafe in Mount Vernon. Because it's close to The Sun, this has been a place I occasionally go for lunch when I'm meeting someone outside the office. By day, Sascha's, located on the first floor of a 19th-century Mount Vernon town house, is set up to provide a quick lunch of good food cafeteria style. At night, like a scene change at the theater, the place becomes a sit-down, not-quite-fine-dining restaurant.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Magnolias: Authentic Southern Cuisine By Donald Barickman The Boathouse Tales and Recipes From a Southern Kitchen By Douglas W. Bostick and Jason R. Davidson Joggling Board Press / 2006 / $26.95 More history than kitchen guide, this attractive cookbook tells the story of the Carolinas through food. Arresting photographs - only a small portion of which are actually of the finished dishes - are displayed next to stories about how ingredients such as asparagus and okra made their way to the region.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 25, 2004
By starting with a very hot skillet (cast-iron is best for this), you can speed up the baking of this simple Southern dish. The pudding is similar to spoon bread and is quite filling, so you'll need only to add a vegetable and salad to make a complete meal. We've suggested andouille sausage here, but any of your favorite sausages can be used, including plain old breakfast sausages. Tips Make sure the oven is heated fully to 425 degrees. Make sure to heat the oil in the skillet almost to the smoking stage before adding the batter.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 14, 1999
Let the good times roll with a Mardi Gras dish that leaves the cook free to two-step instead of standing guard in the kitchen. This chicken and Cajun sausage jambalaya can be made ahead, whenever it's convenient. A quick trip to the store for French bread, pecan pralines or pecan ice cream, and chicory coffee rounds out the preparation for this supper of Louisiana favorites.Andouille (pronounced awn- DWEE) is a heavily smoked, coarsely ground, spicy Cajun sausage. Outside of Louisiana, it is available in specialty-food stores and through mail-order and online sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1998
It isn't hard to imagine horses clopping along the hilly streets of historic Ellicott City. What is hard to imagine is that they were ever kept in what is now the handsome Mill Towne Tavern.This former stable has been transformed into an inviting restaurant with warm, clubby dining rooms on two levels. Before the restaurant opened last June, owner Keith Curtiss and landlord Pete Ruff renovated the sprawling condemned building on Old Columbia Pike and won some awards in the process.It's easy to see why. Inside, there's no sense of the building's rustic past, except for the rough granite walls, where folk-art paintings are hung in heavy gilt frames.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 1, 1998
Few restaurants in Baltimore have appeared with the fanfare Charleston has. By the time the former operators of Savannah opened their own restaurant in December, numerous news stories had trumpeted its arrival. Chef Cindy Wolf and her husband, Tony Foreman, hired a public relations firm and held a grand opening that half the city of Baltimore attended.The problem with creating such high expectations, of course, is that then you have to live up to them. And new restaurants almost always have glitches.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 1, 2012
Unless you have the family on a no-carb diet – and we know how that fad has died out – you probably spend some meal-planning energy on carb-y side dishes to go with protein sources and vegetables. Potatoes, pasta, rice, grains are among the choices. And among the grain-y options we tend to forget are grits. That's right. Grits. The South's answer to Italian polenta. Since we do, in essence, live in the South, you've probably tried had grits for breakfast, but few of us consider fixing them for supper.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | February 13, 2012
The football season is over. So is Groundhog Day. And Valentine's Day, too. But if any excuse for a party will do, don't forget that Mardi Gras is Tuesday, Feb. 21. And while it may be a little late to book your trip to the Big Easy, you can at least get a taste of it at our local Copeland's of New Orleans. The eatery took up residence in Columbia about 11 years ago and still draws its share of fun-loving folks who enjoy contemporary versions of regional Creole/Cajun fare, as well as more American food, like burgers.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 6, 1997
When Bandaloops opened 10 years ago it was, as a restaurant critic said at the time, "maddeningly trendy." With its cute name taken from a Tom Robbins novel and dishes like "Chicken Bingo Pajama" and "Kama Sutra Strata," you had to wonder how this glorified fern bar would ever survive in Federal Hill, which has a certain tough practicality under that yuppie exterior.But survive Bandaloops did, getting rid of most of the literary allusions and arch menu descriptions in the process. Even the food is a little more down to earth these days.
FEATURES
By Dale Curry and Dale Curry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 16, 1994
Not a decade ago, Louisiana sausages were regional treats, the Cajuns snacking on hot boudin, cooks along the river seasoning their gumbos with andouille from a few local butchers, and New Orleanians sandwiching their hot, smoked and Italian sausages in French bread.Today, andouille is a household word in California and might just as easily be heard in Baltimore or Kansas. Boudin, too, has reached the masses, and sausages generally have gotten hotter and more highly seasoned nationwide as part of the fallout of the Cajun craze of the '80s.
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