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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE ( * 1/2 - ONE AND ONE-HALF STAR) Crush is the kind of movie that gives friendship a bad name. It's a pity, too, because the film offers Andie MacDowell her best role to date. As an expatriate American living in England and serving as headmistress of a rural school there (how she came to cross the big pond is never really addressed), MacDowell is given the rare opportunity of being called on to be more than a pretty face and endearing presence. She's good, proving there's plenty of there there for good directors to tap into.
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By Susan King and Susan King,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2002
Two years after completing production, the Eddie Murphy comedy The Adventures of Pluto Nash finally arrived in theaters. The Castle Rock film, in which Murphy plays a nightclub owner on the moon battling the Mafia for control of his establishment, has had a troubled production that included re-shoots; it reportedly cost about $100 million. Critics weren't invited to see the movie before it opened - usually an indication of trouble. Along with his huge hits, Murphy has had some bona fide stinkers over the years.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - When Andie MacDowell's 13-year marriage crumbled in 1999, she was distressed at suddenly having to navigate the harrowing world of dating again. But, as it turned out, her suffering wasn't for naught. Shortly after, MacDowell read the script for Crush, a British film about Kate, a 40-something headmistress who shares an unfortunate similarity with her two best girlfriends - a knack for dating disasters. The moment MacDowell read the script, she knew she had to have the part.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - When Andie MacDowell's 13-year marriage crumbled in 1999, she was distressed at suddenly having to navigate the harrowing world of dating again. But, as it turned out, her suffering wasn't for naught. Shortly after, MacDowell read the script for Crush, a British film about Kate, a 40-something headmistress who shares an unfortunate similarity with her two best girlfriends - a knack for dating disasters. The moment MacDowell read the script, she knew she had to have the part.
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By Lou Cedrone | January 17, 1991
* ''Eve of Destruction'' A robot, designed to look exactly like her creator, turns bad. Gregory Hines and Renee Sutendijk star.* ''Flight of the Intruder'' A Navy pilot and a bombardier go against orders and bomb Hanoi. Willem Dafoe, Danny Glover and Brad Johnson star.* ''Green Card'' A comedy starring Gerard Depardieu as a Frenchman who marries an American woman (Andie MacDowell) to gain possession of a green card, one that will allow him to work in this country.* ''Hamlet'' Mel Gibson, who was introduced to American audiences as Max Max, plays the melancholy Dane in Franco Zeffirelli's version of the Shakespearean tragedy.
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By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
Gerard Depardieu is the big surprise in ''Green Card.'' The actor, without whom there might be no film industry in France, does surprisingly well with his lines. It's surprising because he doesn't really know the English language and was doing his lines by rote.The movie is a minor if not a major pleasure. One of the more interesting things about it is that it was directed by Peter Weir, the Australian who did ''Witness'' and ''Dead Poets Society.'' ''Green Card'' is not the sort of thing you'd expect from someone who did these and ''Picnic at Hanging Rock.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
"The Muse," Albert Brooks' fitfully funny comedy of Hollywood manners, is a strange animal. By turns biting and breezy, it also remarkably retrograde, ultimately sacrificing wit to less interesting likability. Even though the movie is full of Brooks's characteristically caustic lines, he winds up pulling his punches, resulting in a toothless series of vignettes rather than an insider satire on a par with, say, "Bowfinger."Not that Brooks hasn't come up with a terrific premise. He plays Steven Phillips, a middle-aged screenwriter who can feel his career sliding into irrelevance.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 18, 1991
'Green Card'Starring Gerard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell.Directed by Peter Weir.Released by Touchstone.Rated PG-13.***These are tough days on the politically correct. Not only have they been cuffed around violently in both Newsweek and New York magazines, but today two defiantly politically incorrect movies arrive, strutting with bodacious contempt.The louder of these by far is John Milius' browbeating "Flight of the Intruder"; but the better -- also by far -- is Peter Weir's brilliantly off-center "Green Card."
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
''The Object of Beauty,'' currently showing at the Charles, was made for those who enjoy the kind of comedies Hollywood did in the late '30s and early '40s.Michael Lindsay-Hogg, son of actress Geraldine Fitzgerald, wrote and directed the film, one whose principal characters are an American con man and his companion, an American con woman.These two are up to their evening clothing in debt. They can't leave the London hotel they are staying in because they owe too much. Which, of course, doesn't stop them from spending more and more and putting it on the bill.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE ( * 1/2 - ONE AND ONE-HALF STAR) Crush is the kind of movie that gives friendship a bad name. It's a pity, too, because the film offers Andie MacDowell her best role to date. As an expatriate American living in England and serving as headmistress of a rural school there (how she came to cross the big pond is never really addressed), MacDowell is given the rare opportunity of being called on to be more than a pretty face and endearing presence. She's good, proving there's plenty of there there for good directors to tap into.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
"The Muse," Albert Brooks' fitfully funny comedy of Hollywood manners, is a strange animal. By turns biting and breezy, it also remarkably retrograde, ultimately sacrificing wit to less interesting likability. Even though the movie is full of Brooks's characteristically caustic lines, he winds up pulling his punches, resulting in a toothless series of vignettes rather than an insider satire on a par with, say, "Bowfinger."Not that Brooks hasn't come up with a terrific premise. He plays Steven Phillips, a middle-aged screenwriter who can feel his career sliding into irrelevance.
FEATURES
By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 24, 1995
The man with the most memorable on-camera entrances in show business lives up to his billing in the film "Unstrung Heroes," a touching drama directed by Diane Keaton.Michael Richards, who has turned the offbeat Kramer on TV's "Seinfeld" into a national cult figure, makes his grand entrance in the film through a window. It is one of many hysterical moments in a film that is not what one would consider a comedy.Being light among the dark was of serious concern to Mr. Richards, who says he turned down considerably more lucrative offers to do film comedies so that he could appear in this relatively low-budget drama.
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By Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
I hate to go out on a limb like this but I think Jonathan Kaplan, the director of "Bad Girls," just may have seen "The Wild Bunch."For anyone familiar with the great 1969 Peckinpah picture, "Bad Girls" will seem like the revisionist Bennington version. Visually, it's Sam Peckinpah's trashy, sad, run-down West; and you keep seeing dimmer versions of "Wild Bunch" themes and imagery: a train robbery, a wagon loaded with stolen guns, a machinegun, a tortured hostage, a quartet of determined gringo gunfighters heading through a ruined Mexican fortress for a last big gunfight.
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By Los Angeles Times | October 22, 1992
What was that strange grinding noise reverberating through Hollywood recently? The collective teeth-gnashing of a number of A-list actresses.Meryl Streep, the casting coup queen, strikes again. First "Sophie's Choice," then "Plenty," then "Death Becomes Her" and now "The House of the Spirits."The lead in director Bille August's next movie, which begins shooting Jan. 18 and is penciled in for Christmas 1993 release, was, it seems, the most coveted female part since Cat- woman. Ms. Streep will play the role of Clara opposite Jeremy Irons, a role she quickly agreed to do after reading Mr. August's adaptation of Isabel Allende's 1985 best-seller.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
I hate to go out on a limb like this but I think Jonathan Kaplan, the director of "Bad Girls," just may have seen "The Wild Bunch."For anyone familiar with the great 1969 Peckinpah picture, "Bad Girls" will seem like the revisionist Bennington version. Visually, it's Sam Peckinpah's trashy, sad, run-down West; and you keep seeing dimmer versions of "Wild Bunch" themes and imagery: a train robbery, a wagon loaded with stolen guns, a machinegun, a tortured hostage, a quartet of determined gringo gunfighters heading through a ruined Mexican fortress for a last big gunfight.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 22, 1992
What was that strange grinding noise reverberating through Hollywood recently? The collective teeth-gnashing of a number of A-list actresses.Meryl Streep, the casting coup queen, strikes again. First "Sophie's Choice," then "Plenty," then "Death Becomes Her" and now "The House of the Spirits."The lead in director Bille August's next movie, which begins shooting Jan. 18 and is penciled in for Christmas 1993 release, was, it seems, the most coveted female part since Cat- woman. Ms. Streep will play the role of Clara opposite Jeremy Irons, a role she quickly agreed to do after reading Mr. August's adaptation of Isabel Allende's 1985 best-seller.
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By Los Angeles Times | August 27, 1991
Usually, the fight for screen space at the nation's theaters is a bruising one. But sometimes, Hollywood studios actually don't want their movies to open on many screens. It's a strategy called "platforming," and in the case of Disney-Touchstone's "The Doctor," it appears to be working."The Doctor," starring William Hurt as a cocky surgeon who experiences the cold side of the medical system when he develops cancer, opened July 26 in six theaters. "It's a movie that we knew critics and audiences would respond to," says Touchstone President David Hoberman.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
''The Object of Beauty,'' currently showing at the Charles, was made for those who enjoy the kind of comedies Hollywood did in the late '30s and early '40s.Michael Lindsay-Hogg, son of actress Geraldine Fitzgerald, wrote and directed the film, one whose principal characters are an American con man and his companion, an American con woman.These two are up to their evening clothing in debt. They can't leave the London hotel they are staying in because they owe too much. Which, of course, doesn't stop them from spending more and more and putting it on the bill.
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