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NEWS
June 21, 2007
On June 18, 2007, YOLANDA MARIA CHRISTINA ANDES, age 96, of Randallstown, beloved wife of the late Frank Frederick Andes, devoted mother of Evelyn Rose Cavanaugh, Frank F. Andes, Jr., James A. Andes, Thomas L. Andes, William J. Andes and the late Dolores M. Klein. She is also survived by 28 grandchildren, 59 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care of Maryland, 7008 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD, 21244.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2007
On June 18, 2007, YOLANDA MARIA CHRISTINA ANDES, age 96, of Randallstown, beloved wife of the late Frank Frederick Andes, devoted mother of Evelyn Rose Cavanaugh, Frank F. Andes, Jr., James A. Andes, Thomas L. Andes, William J. Andes and the late Dolores M. Klein. She is also survived by 28 grandchildren, 59 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care of Maryland, 7008 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD, 21244.
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NEWS
By Alan Singer and Alan Singer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
"Death in the Andes," by Mario Vargas Llosa. Translated by Edith Grossman. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 276 pages. $24 The title of Mario Vargas Llosa's new novel, "Death in the Andes," invites us to entertain expectations of a particular, and so conventionally, dramatic death. Indeed, within 15 pages a beatific young couple arriving for spiritual communion with the Andean heights is brutally murdered by blank-faced children of the Shining Path. But this is only the first of myriad deaths.
TRAVEL
By Jason Blevins | August 1, 2004
Charles Darwin, who traipsed through South America in the mid-1800s, was somewhat perplexed with the barren stretch of Andes Mountains in southern Argentina, preferring the range's more diverse offerings in Chile. Obviously, Darwin didn't ski. The serrated, bleak Andes in southern Argentina is a ski experience like no other. The Valle de Las Lenas resort combines the steeps of Jackson Hole, the snowy aprons of Europe and the vistas of Colorado's slopes -- all from a single mountaintop lift that gives access to more than half a million acres of off-trail skiing.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
How often does one night of television offer two visits to the majestic Andes Mountains of South America? Documentaries on PBS and the Learning Channel accomplish the vicarious travel feat.* "The New Explorers: Expedition Inspiration" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The expedition was to Mount Aconcagua in Argentina, at 22,834 feet the tallest peak in the Southern Hemisphere. The inspiration was provided by survivors of breast cancer, such as expedition leader Laura Evans and the other members of her party.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 12, 1998
Stunning photography and some people with unusual ways of spending their time highlight the Discovery Channel's look at "The Andes" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats midnight-3 a.m.).Narrated by Christopher Plummer, the series takes great delight in profiling one of the most ecologically diverse regions of the planet. Its usual tack is to take one aspect of the 4,700-mile-long South American mountain chain, usually an animal or a geographic feature (sometimes both, since the latter tends to attract the former)
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1997
PASADENA, Calif. -- Sojourner, the pint-size robot geologist, has taken the first chemical fingerprint of a rock on Mars and determined that it resembles the lava found on the Andes mountains.Significantly, the 8-inch-high rock known as "Barnacle Bill" shows signs of repeated heating and melting, an indication that the red planet stayed warm longer than scientists previously thought.This is another bit of evidence supporting the theory that Mars was once warm, wet and possibly hospitable to primitive life.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1997
SAQUISILI, Ecuador -- The indigenous people cling to the high Andes Mountains, coming down as deliberately as the glaciers from the nearby 19,348-foot Cotopaxi volcano.As they have for generations, the Quechua-speaking descendants of the Incas herd sheep on wind-swept hills. They grow crops on terraced slopes of fertile lava turned to soil. At times they descend the 2,000 feet to go to market in this town in the Central Highlands.The hardy mountaineers endure harsh sunlight near the equator and cold, stormy nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 13, 2004
In the late 1970s, Father Ugo de Censi, an Italian missionary priest of the Salesian Order, arrived in the impoverished Peruvian village of Chacas, nestled in the shadow of the Cordillera Blanca high in the Andes mountains. On inspecting his new parish, de Censi found the town's lovely colonial-era church sadly dilapidated and its beautiful 18th-century altarpiece damaged almost beyond repair. An even more urgent need presented itself in the form of de Censi's parishioners, among the poorest of the poor.
FEATURES
By Todd Shapera and Todd Shapera,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
In the cooling air of the early evening, as we entered Argentina's fertile Mendoza valley, the Andes began to soar over the horizon. We followed the sunset and soon were enveloped by a mountain canyon that followed the banks of the Mendoza River, with its sweeping bends displaying flashes of white water.About 20 miles farther west, we turned onto a bumpy, steep dirt road to reach the remote hamlet of El Salto. Here, our $55-a-night cabin sat on a small, verdant plateau surrounded by high peaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 13, 2004
In the late 1970s, Father Ugo de Censi, an Italian missionary priest of the Salesian Order, arrived in the impoverished Peruvian village of Chacas, nestled in the shadow of the Cordillera Blanca high in the Andes mountains. On inspecting his new parish, de Censi found the town's lovely colonial-era church sadly dilapidated and its beautiful 18th-century altarpiece damaged almost beyond repair. An even more urgent need presented itself in the form of de Censi's parishioners, among the poorest of the poor.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 20, 2004
The whole world has come back!" exclaims mountain climber Joe Simpson as he emerges into sunlight from a crevasse beneath the 21,000-foot peak of Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes. And that's how this simultaneously harrowing and glorious docudrama ultimately makes a viewer feel - as if the air outside has a new taste. Touching the Void does what only the best nature adventures can do. It inspires wonder at the rough and risky beauty of an unspoiled portion of the Earth and a harsh, tempered joy at the way it can push human strength to its pinnacle.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
The Nativity scene at the Catholic Center is a small masterpiece of woodcarving by the peasant artisans of a remote village high in the Peruvian Andes. The creche might be an altar piece from Renaissance Italy, with the finely carved Virgin praying, St. Joseph reverent, a shepherd and king adoring at the crib side, an ox and a donkey peering from the stable. But the shepherds with their sheep stepping into the scene under the golden guiding star could be peasants from the high Andes village of Chacas where the figures were carved.
NEWS
By Halle Gaut and Halle Gaut,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2002
Tired of walking the mall and feeling that everything looks the same? May we suggest a taste of Peru? The Peruvian Connection is known for its signature use of alpaca wools and Pima cottons. Owners Annie and Biddy Hurlbut, after many travels to Peru, finally figured out a way to share the region's rich Andean textile and knitting traditions with the rest of the world. What started out as a catalog now includes a Web site as well as retail stores. Marylanders are lucky enough to have one at the Prime Outlets in Perryville.
NEWS
By Nicholas Wade and Nicholas Wade,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2001
A delicate piece of detective work in the collections of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew has started to cast light on the origins of the blight that caused the Irish potato famines a century and a half ago. Analysis of DNA from stricken potato leaves has confirmed that the pathogen was a fungus known as Phytophthora infestans, but suggests that it did not originate in the Toluca Valley of Mexico, a hot spot of different strains of the blight that has...
TRAVEL
By Richard O'Mara and By Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2001
I met a devil in the street. He stood only 4 feet tall. He threw flour at me, or maybe it was talcum powder. Then he sprayed me with white foam from an aerosol can. I would have sprayed him back, but I had no can. He got away, laughing under his mask. That happened early in the evening of the first day of carnival in Humahuaca, Argentina. You could have illuminated a small city with the energy expended that night in the plaza, with the church on one side, the cabildo (town hall) with its mechanical saint on the other.
TRAVEL
By Jason Blevins | August 1, 2004
Charles Darwin, who traipsed through South America in the mid-1800s, was somewhat perplexed with the barren stretch of Andes Mountains in southern Argentina, preferring the range's more diverse offerings in Chile. Obviously, Darwin didn't ski. The serrated, bleak Andes in southern Argentina is a ski experience like no other. The Valle de Las Lenas resort combines the steeps of Jackson Hole, the snowy aprons of Europe and the vistas of Colorado's slopes -- all from a single mountaintop lift that gives access to more than half a million acres of off-trail skiing.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
Havre de Grace High School Principal Jon Andes didn't exactly say "I told you so."But you'd understand if he did.Last week he learned his school was one of eight schools in Maryland selected to compete for the prestigious national School Recognition Program."
SPORTS
By Gerard Shields and Erika Niedowski and Gerard Shields and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
As she has for the past 31 years, Peggy Andes studied the Orioles' roster yesterday like a schoolteacher looking over her new roll of pupils.Under crystal blue skies and brilliant sunshine, Andes sat along the third base side of Oriole Park, her insides fluttering with all the emotions that Opening Day brings: trepidation, hope, anxiety and joy. Gone were familiar names like Alomar, Palmeiro and Davis, replaced by the likes of Belle, Clark and Garcia."
NEWS
By Kirk Semple and Kirk Semple,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1998
PITAYO, Colombia -- Eight people were murdered last year in this small mountain village of Paez Indians; at least six of the deaths are blamed on a flower.Townspeople also tell of the advent of prostitution and the rape of more than a dozen girls, all in the past few years. Same cause: "la flor."So it has gone since the beginning of the decade when this reservation of 5,200 residents, wedged high in the Andes of southwest Colombia, saw the arrival of the opium poppy -- the source of heroin -- and with it the disintegration of a community.
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