Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAncient Rome
IN THE NEWS

Ancient Rome

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Matthew B. Roller Professor The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Salary --$76,000 Age --39 Years on the job --12 Teaching --Roller is a tenured professor and heads the classics department, which covers anything about ancient Rome or Greece from about 1500 B.C. to A.D. 500, including its culture, philosophy, art, literature and history. He specializes in the literature and history of the ancient Roman world. Typical day --Roller sits on various academic committees. He usually teaches two classes each semester - one at the graduate level and the other for undergraduates.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Showing her knack for timing, director Christy Stanlake has announced the U.S. Naval Academy Masqueraders will bookend Halloween with weekend performances of "Titus Andronicus" — "Shakespeare's first and bloodiest play" is the way she describes it — Oct. 26-27 and Nov. 2-4 at Mahan Theatre on campus. In her 11th year as Masqueraders director, Stanlake, who is also an associate professor, is known for her insightful and courageous choices of plays. When she came aboard in fall 2002, Stanlake immediately displayed vision by focusing on the role of female military leadership in George Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 5, 2000
Well, it's better than "The Phantom Menace." It's difficult to believe that it was just a year ago we -- well, some of us -- were waiting with bated breath for the next installment of "Star Wars," only to have those high hopes dashed on the shoals of George Lucas' dried-up digital effects. "Gladiator," this summer's first official blockbuster, at least pulses with more life and narrative sense than last year's, albeit not much more. For all its pumped-up action and epic historical sweep, it still feels like a movie designed to go straight to the small screen.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | December 18, 2008
Dec. 17 marked the start of Saturnalia in ancient Rome. Seneca the Younger described the holidays in A.D. 50: "It is now the month of December, when the greatest part of the city is in a bustle. Loose reins are given to public dissipation; everywhere you may hear the sound of great preparations, as if there were some real difference between the days devoted to Saturn and those for transacting business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2005
NEW YORK - At one point during the 14-month, $100 million production of HBO's new series Rome, actor James Purefoy, who plays Mark Antony, was introduced to a group of Italian extras undergoing rigorous boot-camp training to portray Roman soldiers. The cameras weren't rolling, and on any other set, the moment would have consisted of behind-the-scenes chitchat. But months of immersion in a painstakingly detailed re-creation of the ancient city had its effect. As he stood in a replica of the Forum - constructed to scale at the renowned Cinecitta Studios in Rome - Purefoy addressed the men not as himself but as the famed Roman commander.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER and HAL PIPER,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
There are three Saints Valentine -- or possibly only one. And there was Valentinus, who wasn't a saint at all, but founded a sect later judged heretical. There was even a Pope Valentine for 40 days in the late summer of 827.The 1913 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia lists two Valentines who were beheaded Feb. 14, about A.D. 269, in or near Rome, and a third martyred in Africa. Stories about the first two, the book says, are "of relatively late date and of no historical value." Of the third, "nothing further is known."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | December 18, 2008
Dec. 17 marked the start of Saturnalia in ancient Rome. Seneca the Younger described the holidays in A.D. 50: "It is now the month of December, when the greatest part of the city is in a bustle. Loose reins are given to public dissipation; everywhere you may hear the sound of great preparations, as if there were some real difference between the days devoted to Saturn and those for transacting business.
NEWS
March 31, 1992
THE FOLLOWING excerpt from an article by Jeffrey Thomas, based on a 1989-1990 survey by the National Endowment for the Humanities of 481 schoolteacher, appears in the March/April issue of the NEH publication Humanities:High school teachers of U.S. history are spending more classroom time teaching the twentieth century than the early history of the nation, running counter to the oft-stated complaint that teachers run out of teaching time at the end of...
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 20, 1993
Q: What's the value of my 19-inch-high glass vase marked "Le Verre Francais" and signed "Charder"? It was a wedding present to my mother in 1929.A: "Le Verre Francais" was a commercial line of cameo glass made by the C. Schneider factory in Epinay-sur-Seine, France, from 1920 to 1933. Your vase, signed by its artist, Charder, has an acid-engraved floral design over layered glass in different colors. It's worth around $1,400, according to vintage glass dealer Jack McAuliff, of Fancy That, 324 W. Broad St., Chesaning, Mich.
NEWS
January 3, 1998
FOOD FOR THOUGHT, courtesy of the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, a transportation planning body for Baltimore City and Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Howard, Harford and Carroll counties:The Baltimore region adds 30 households a day. Baltimore County gains 11 of those, while the city loses almost five a day.Since the end of the 1991-92 recession, the region has been adding about 59 new jobs every workday. Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties gain 20 to 30 of those jobs a day. The city loses 21 jobs a day.The average household in the region spends $84 a week on groceries, and, in addition, almost half that much each week at restaurants and other eating and drinking establishments.
NEWS
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2007
Here we go round the mulberry bush, The mulberry bush, the mulberry bush. Here we go round the mulberry bush, So early in the morning. Never in my childhood singing of that cloying Mother Goose nursery rhyme did I imagine that its words would one day have a literal meaning for me. Yet here I am at first light these June mornings, walking slowly around the large weeping mulberry across from our front door, carefully plucking small, dark berries from...
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Matthew B. Roller Professor The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Salary --$76,000 Age --39 Years on the job --12 Teaching --Roller is a tenured professor and heads the classics department, which covers anything about ancient Rome or Greece from about 1500 B.C. to A.D. 500, including its culture, philosophy, art, literature and history. He specializes in the literature and history of the ancient Roman world. Typical day --Roller sits on various academic committees. He usually teaches two classes each semester - one at the graduate level and the other for undergraduates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2005
NEW YORK - At one point during the 14-month, $100 million production of HBO's new series Rome, actor James Purefoy, who plays Mark Antony, was introduced to a group of Italian extras undergoing rigorous boot-camp training to portray Roman soldiers. The cameras weren't rolling, and on any other set, the moment would have consisted of behind-the-scenes chitchat. But months of immersion in a painstakingly detailed re-creation of the ancient city had its effect. As he stood in a replica of the Forum - constructed to scale at the renowned Cinecitta Studios in Rome - Purefoy addressed the men not as himself but as the famed Roman commander.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Spencer Ryan Trusz, a Web site designer whose diverse interests ranged from ancient Rome to Star Trek to world peace, died Wednesday at his home in Glen Burnie after a two-year bout with brain cancer. He was 25. A young man who thought deeply about the suffering and sacrifices of others, Mr. Trusz spent Memorial Day writing letters of thanks to all the military veterans he knew and to his godparents, who belonged to an international peace movement. "He spent a lot of time thinking about justice and injustice in the world," said his sister, Nicole Pekarske of Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
Colonial Players' A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum exposes human foibles recognized in 200 B.C., when Titus Maccius Plautus revealed them to Roman audiences. In 1962, Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart brought Plautus' puns, mistaken identities and cross-dressing to Broadway, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Plautus might have been ancient Rome's Mel Brooks, offending everyone equally. Romping with these politically incorrect Romans is the most fun I've had in the theater this century.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 5, 2000
Well, it's better than "The Phantom Menace." It's difficult to believe that it was just a year ago we -- well, some of us -- were waiting with bated breath for the next installment of "Star Wars," only to have those high hopes dashed on the shoals of George Lucas' dried-up digital effects. "Gladiator," this summer's first official blockbuster, at least pulses with more life and narrative sense than last year's, albeit not much more. For all its pumped-up action and epic historical sweep, it still feels like a movie designed to go straight to the small screen.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
Colonial Players' A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum exposes human foibles recognized in 200 B.C., when Titus Maccius Plautus revealed them to Roman audiences. In 1962, Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart brought Plautus' puns, mistaken identities and cross-dressing to Broadway, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Plautus might have been ancient Rome's Mel Brooks, offending everyone equally. Romping with these politically incorrect Romans is the most fun I've had in the theater this century.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER and HAL PIPER,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
There are three Saints Valentine -- or possibly only one. And there was Valentinus, who wasn't a saint at all, but founded a sect later judged heretical. There was even a Pope Valentine for 40 days in the late summer of 827.The 1913 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia lists two Valentines who were beheaded Feb. 14, about A.D. 269, in or near Rome, and a third martyred in Africa. Stories about the first two, the book says, are "of relatively late date and of no historical value." Of the third, "nothing further is known."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.