Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAncient History
IN THE NEWS

Ancient History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 25, 2012
The Howard County school board's apology for the era of segregated schools seems at first blush a magnanimous gesture of reconciliation ("Howard school board apologizes for segregation," Nov. 16). But on further reflection, it doesn't jibe with the board's more recent history. While addressing issues from a dark, bygone era of racial inequality may be cathartic, those who created and perpetuated that social order are long gone. But present day board members need only look back to 2009, when they were party to the widespread disrespect of President Barack Obama by making students' attendance at his welcome back to school address optional.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 25, 2012
The Howard County school board's apology for the era of segregated schools seems at first blush a magnanimous gesture of reconciliation ("Howard school board apologizes for segregation," Nov. 16). But on further reflection, it doesn't jibe with the board's more recent history. While addressing issues from a dark, bygone era of racial inequality may be cathartic, those who created and perpetuated that social order are long gone. But present day board members need only look back to 2009, when they were party to the widespread disrespect of President Barack Obama by making students' attendance at his welcome back to school address optional.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
Ludlow Hopkins Baldwin, a former Gilman School headmaster who brought diversity to the school and guided it through the turbulent '60s, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Roland Park Place Retirement Community. He was 92.A Baltimore native, Mr. Baldwin graduated from City College in 1921 and Gilman School in 1922. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1926 and a master's degree in archaeology from the Johns Hopkins University in 1947.A 1929 graduate of Harvard Law School, he practiced law for one week in New York City before he abandoned his legal career, returned to Baltimore and went to work for Terminal Warehouse Co. He served as president of the storage firm from 1936 to 1942.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | January 8, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS-- --Is Tony Dungy concerned about his players being distracted or even intrigued by the Colts' history with the city of Baltimore? Get ready to shake your head. The answer might be laughable if it weren't so sad. Brace yourself ... "Probably most of our guys - I'd say two-thirds of our players - don't even know that we started out in Baltimore," Dungy, the Colts coach, said yesterday. "So those two-thirds, they won't even know. You talk about Willie Mays and Jim Brown, these guys don't know who that is. So you talk about the Baltimore Colts, there would be a lot of guys who would not be aware of that."
TRAVEL
By BERNADETTE BURGER and BERNADETTE BURGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
My husband, Erich, and I met my folks for two weeks of vacation in England. Driving toward the Lake District on a blustery spring day, we stopped to see Hadrian's Wall. I expected a typical tourist destination and was surprised when we found a section of the wall down a small country lane without a gate - no park entrance fee, and hardly even a sign. We simply parked on the side of the road near an elementary school in rural England where kids were playing in the schoolyard. Not far from the road, Hadrian's Wall stretched off across the countryside, ranging in height from 2 feet to about 10 feet.
FEATURES
By Mary K. Feeney and Mary K. Feeney,HARTFORD COURANT | April 16, 1998
In the beginning, there were B.C. and A.D.Now, as the 20th century draws to a close, things are not so clear-cut.Not only is there a question about when the 21st century actually begins -- on the first day of January 2000 or the following year -- but some historians and others also are replacing B.C. and A.D. with the designations C.E. and B.C.E.The designation B.C. (Before Christ) and A.D. (Anno Domini, Latin for In the Year of the Lord) date to 527 years after the birth of Christ and are still widely used.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 14, 2002
The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek, by Barry Cunliffe (Walker and Co., 192 pages, $24). Setting out from the Greek city now known as Marseille, in the year 330 B.C., the explorer Pytheas traveled to the coasts of France and Denmark and then to the British isles, perhaps getting as far as Ireland and even Iceland -- making him, by most judgments, the first literate person to get to those areas that were unknown and feared by the civilizations on...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- In classrooms and on campuses, in living rooms and workplaces, a week before the presidential runoff election young Poles are saying: Forget their favorite candidate's Communist past. He is, many of them argue, the force for the future.Many first-time voters in next Sunday's election say they will choose Aleksander Kwasniewski, 40, a telegenic former Communist, because as a man who speaks English and knows some economics, he is a modern man.Lech Walesa, 52, who as leader of the Solidarity labor movement cracked the Communist system and who has been president for five years, is an emblem of history and should remain that way, they assert.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | September 13, 1992
Summer is over. Yippee! No more weekends of racing to the beach or pool to see how water-logged, sunburned, sand-flea-bitten, food-poisoned and overstuffed with small talk we can make ourselves by sundown on Sunday night.No more half-raw, blackened pieces of barbecued chicken served with lukewarm, mayonnaise-laden potato salad gunk. No more having to have fun, fun, fun in the sun, sun, sun. Let's hear it for rainy, snowy weekends when we can hibernate without guilt -- or sunscreen.No more long, lazy days for our children, either.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
He's not on anyone's mind this week. Especially this week. He's just a nice, older guy who used to work around here. In a way, he's the forgotten Raven. Ted Marchibroda has been gone a whole two years, just feels like 10. In 1996, Marchibroda, who had spent nine years coaching the old Baltimore Colts, became the first head coach of the new Baltimore Ravens. Over three seasons, his record was 16-31-1. In late 1998, Marchibroda was no longer the coach of the Baltimore Ravens. That's ancient history in professional sports, where ancient history is defined as "any time more than two years."
SPORTS
By GARY LAMBRECHT and GARY LAMBRECHT,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
Nearly nine months after delivering the ultimate prize to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse coach Dave Pietramala would rather not talk about it. Pietramala is way too busy analyzing videotape of a recent practice and contemplating tomorrow's season opener against Albany to think about that glorious Memorial Day last year when the Blue Jays ended 17 years of frustration. He is too consumed with teaching this younger team the right way to do things, whether it's positioning and rotating properly on defense or keeping the locker room spotless and staying on top of schoolwork.
TRAVEL
By BERNADETTE BURGER and BERNADETTE BURGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
My husband, Erich, and I met my folks for two weeks of vacation in England. Driving toward the Lake District on a blustery spring day, we stopped to see Hadrian's Wall. I expected a typical tourist destination and was surprised when we found a section of the wall down a small country lane without a gate - no park entrance fee, and hardly even a sign. We simply parked on the side of the road near an elementary school in rural England where kids were playing in the schoolyard. Not far from the road, Hadrian's Wall stretched off across the countryside, ranging in height from 2 feet to about 10 feet.
SPORTS
By Vince DiGregorio and Vince DiGregorio,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2005
VILLANOVA, Pa. - It took a span of 1 minute, 21 seconds for the Bayhawks to forget their first loss of the season. Tom Marechek sparked a four-goal flurry in the second quarter, and the Bayhawks went on to defeat the Philadelphia Barrage, 19-9, last night before 3,009 at Villanova Stadium. But the Bayhawks (10-1) failed to clinch the top seed heading into the playoffs as Boston defeated Long Island, 10-9, in overtime. The Bayhawks can correct that situation with a victory in their regular-season season finale in Rochester on Aug. 13 or a Boston loss at Long Island on Aug. 12. The visitors jumped out to a three-goal lead only to see Philadelphia pull to within 4-3, but Marechek scored to reverse the momentum with 12:26 left in the second quarter.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 29, 2003
In a recent column, I wrote about a Rutgers University study on the reluctance of young men to commit to marriage and family life, and it produced a firestorm of angry responses. In e-mails, letters, phone calls and online conversations, men said they found women to be high-handed, demanding, duplicitous, dominating, spoiled, superior, selfish and unworthy of anything more than a single night of easy sex. Why would they want to marry one? I was astonished at the venom directed not only at me, but at women in general and particularly single women.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Life was tough 3,900 years ago. Back in biblical times there were no homebuilders. No television sets. No grocery stores. This was the message for about 300 children who gathered yesterday at the Jewish Museum of Maryland on Lloyd Street for the opening of From Tent to Temple: Life in the Ancient Near East, an interactive exhibit for youngsters. "People had to hunt for their own food, make their own shelters and protect themselves," said 11-year-old Dena Lehmann of Baltimore. "It was really hard for them to eat."
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Life was tough 3,900 years ago. Back in biblical times there were no homebuilders. No television sets. No grocery stores. This was the message for about 300 children who gathered yesterday at the Jewish Museum of Maryland on Lloyd Street for the opening of From Tent to Temple: Life in the Ancient Near East, an interactive exhibit for youngsters. "People had to hunt for their own food, make their own shelters and protect themselves," said Dena Lehmann, a wide-eyed 11-year-old from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Creation of the Department of Homeland Security is a vindication for former Sens. Gary Hart, Democrat of Colorado, and Warren Rudman, Republican of New Hampshire, who nine months before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks warned of the threat and called for just such a new federal agency. Mr. Hart, while expressing some satisfaction that it has now been approved, says "a year and a half has been wasted" by President Bush's failure to act sooner on their recommendation and those of Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Republican Rep. William "Mac" Thornberry.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | September 11, 1995
ALTHOUGH SOME citizens hold that affirmative action should be scrapped, and many others believe it needs serious fixing, still others respect it as the remedy which has ameliorated, if not cured, America's outrageous and time honored discrimination against blacks, other minorities and women, and has helped millions of qualified American citizens to obtain jobs and scholarships they would never have had the slightest chance of getting without it. It has...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Creation of the Department of Homeland Security is a vindication for former Sens. Gary Hart, Democrat of Colorado, and Warren Rudman, Republican of New Hampshire, who nine months before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks warned of the threat and called for just such a new federal agency. Mr. Hart, while expressing some satisfaction that it has now been approved, says "a year and a half has been wasted" by President Bush's failure to act sooner on their recommendation and those of Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Republican Rep. William "Mac" Thornberry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 14, 2002
The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek, by Barry Cunliffe (Walker and Co., 192 pages, $24). Setting out from the Greek city now known as Marseille, in the year 330 B.C., the explorer Pytheas traveled to the coasts of France and Denmark and then to the British isles, perhaps getting as far as Ireland and even Iceland -- making him, by most judgments, the first literate person to get to those areas that were unknown and feared by the civilizations on...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.