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By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2005
THURMONT -- Don't tell students at Catoctin High School that ancient Greek is a dead language. The kids in Frederick Brainerd's ancient Greek class use it in their instant messaging. And don't tell them Latin is dead, either. "The pope speaks it, too, and he's not dead," said Luke Baseley, a junior at the high school. "So Latin is not dead." Catoctin High might be the only public high school in Maryland to teach both languages. Although Latin is taught elsewhere in Frederick County and widely throughout the state - including in Howard County - ancient Greek is taught only at Catoctin, where 28 students are enrolled for Brainerd's class next semester.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 13, 2006
Although she's entering her 50th year of teaching at St. John's College in Annapolis, Eva Brann is no intellectual snob. Trained in ancient Greek archaeology, she describes the school's mission as: "Our books demand that we be linguistically acute, mathematically quick and philosophically deep every day." But she also enjoys fly-fishing, railroads and listening to Dolly Parton. Brann, 77, is as American as a transplanted Brooklyn woman belonging to a network of European World War II refugees can get. And as the longest-serving tutor at the small private college, she will lead the formal faculty procession tomorrow at commencement.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1991
PSYCHIKO, Greece -- Choosing words that have fired the mind for centuries, the teacher started writing on the blackboard and the students concentrated as the opening lines of Homer's "Odyssey" appeared."
FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
The ancient Greeks probably had no idea when they scheduled the first Olympic Games in 776 B.C. that the simple footrace held in honor of Zeus would evolve into the lavishly produced, heavily hyped, ratings-conscious, drama-laden, up-close-and-personal international extravaganza it has become. Or so you would think. Recent archaeological research, however - specifically, the discovery of an ancient Greek parchment, found at the bottom of an ancient Greek trash can buried in a mound of volcanic ash outside a souvlaki drive-through - shows that, even nearly 3,000 years ago, the founders of the Olympics did have some inkling of what was ahead.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
The Great Kite Fly in Annapolis yesterday brought out the boy in 2-year-old Jaron Blunt and the girl in 72-year-old Joan Urbas. Neither paid any attention to the scores of other kite-fliers on the green fields of St. John's College as they concentrated on the task at hand. For when it comes right down to it, kite-flying is an intensely individual sport. St. John's College, a scholarly campus where 450 undergraduates read a "great books" curriculum that includes ancient Greek, philosophy and English poetry, holds the kite festival to bring the college and community together.
NEWS
By Michael James | October 3, 1990
WANTED: Traveling Bard to provide inspiration at an office in need of musical enlightenment.The qualified candidate will possess his/her own lyre and must be versed in ancient Greek poetry. Voice must be soft and lilting. Minstrels a plus but not necessary.Added consideration will be given to those who have a whimsical view of Howard County happenings and various news events that shape the daily lives of those who work in the county mainstream.We offer an excellent benefits package and pleasant working conditions, but no pay. The job will be rewarding to those whose mission is to use music as an inspirational force in the modern-day office structure.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 13, 2006
Although she's entering her 50th year of teaching at St. John's College in Annapolis, Eva Brann is no intellectual snob. Trained in ancient Greek archaeology, she describes the school's mission as: "Our books demand that we be linguistically acute, mathematically quick and philosophically deep every day." But she also enjoys fly-fishing, railroads and listening to Dolly Parton. Brann, 77, is as American as a transplanted Brooklyn woman belonging to a network of European World War II refugees can get. And as the longest-serving tutor at the small private college, she will lead the formal faculty procession tomorrow at commencement.
FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
The ancient Greeks probably had no idea when they scheduled the first Olympic Games in 776 B.C. that the simple footrace held in honor of Zeus would evolve into the lavishly produced, heavily hyped, ratings-conscious, drama-laden, up-close-and-personal international extravaganza it has become. Or so you would think. Recent archaeological research, however - specifically, the discovery of an ancient Greek parchment, found at the bottom of an ancient Greek trash can buried in a mound of volcanic ash outside a souvlaki drive-through - shows that, even nearly 3,000 years ago, the founders of the Olympics did have some inkling of what was ahead.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2002
ATHENS, Greece - In 1801, Thomas Bruce, the seventh Earl of Elgin and British ambassador to Constantinople, hit upon what he considered a splendid idea. The ancient Greek temple of the Parthenon - among the most famous buildings in the world - was decorated with a series of 17 marble figures and a 525-foot-long frieze depicting the ancient Greek gods and heroes. They didn't seem to be doing anybody any good at the 2,500-year-old edifice atop the Acropolis. So why not hammer them off and transport them to a place where they would be better appreciated - that is, England's green and pleasant land?
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2005
Ringing the tower bells early yesterday was a post-midnight moment of truth for 93 seniors at St. John's College in Annapolis who had just handed in their senior essays. The scene was more sedate than the neighboring Naval Academy's annual spring ritual of climbing the greased Herndon Monument. But then, "Johnnies," as the undergraduate liberal arts students are called, are generally known for their devotion to the life of the mind. This midwinter night, however, was a time to be festive.
NEWS
By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2005
THURMONT -- Don't tell students at Catoctin High School that ancient Greek is a dead language. The kids in Frederick Brainerd's ancient Greek class use it in their instant messaging. And don't tell them Latin is dead, either. "The pope speaks it, too, and he's not dead," said Luke Baseley, a junior at the high school. "So Latin is not dead." Catoctin High might be the only public high school in Maryland to teach both languages. Although Latin is taught elsewhere in Frederick County and widely throughout the state - including in Howard County - ancient Greek is taught only at Catoctin, where 28 students are enrolled for Brainerd's class next semester.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2005
Ringing the tower bells early yesterday was a post-midnight moment of truth for 93 seniors at St. John's College in Annapolis who had just handed in their senior essays. The scene was more sedate than the neighboring Naval Academy's annual spring ritual of climbing the greased Herndon Monument. But then, "Johnnies," as the undergraduate liberal arts students are called, are generally known for their devotion to the life of the mind. This midwinter night, however, was a time to be festive.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
The Great Kite Fly in Annapolis yesterday brought out the boy in 2-year-old Jaron Blunt and the girl in 72-year-old Joan Urbas. Neither paid any attention to the scores of other kite-fliers on the green fields of St. John's College as they concentrated on the task at hand. For when it comes right down to it, kite-flying is an intensely individual sport. St. John's College, a scholarly campus where 450 undergraduates read a "great books" curriculum that includes ancient Greek, philosophy and English poetry, holds the kite festival to bring the college and community together.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2002
ATHENS, Greece - In 1801, Thomas Bruce, the seventh Earl of Elgin and British ambassador to Constantinople, hit upon what he considered a splendid idea. The ancient Greek temple of the Parthenon - among the most famous buildings in the world - was decorated with a series of 17 marble figures and a 525-foot-long frieze depicting the ancient Greek gods and heroes. They didn't seem to be doing anybody any good at the 2,500-year-old edifice atop the Acropolis. So why not hammer them off and transport them to a place where they would be better appreciated - that is, England's green and pleasant land?
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Don't expect ancient in Disney's "Hercules." Forget your tattered copy of Bulfinch's mythology. Disney's 35th animated motion picture has more to do with Nike the sneaker than Nike the Greek goddess. The references are thoroughly contemporary, from hostile takeovers to mega-theme parks to Rolling Stones lyrics.Yup, Disney does a Disney on Greek mythology. It takes what little it needs from the original and ditches the rest.It is heavenly as well as devilishly ironic. "Hercules" is a cautionary tale about celebrity from Disney, the premier manufacturer of the stuff.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Don't expect ancient in Disney's "Hercules." Forget your tattered copy of Bulfinch's mythology. Disney's 35th animated motion picture has more to do with Nike the sneaker than Nike the Greek goddess. The references are thoroughly contemporary, from hostile takeovers to mega-theme parks to Rolling Stones lyrics.Yup, Disney does a Disney on Greek mythology. It takes what little it needs from the original and ditches the rest.It is heavenly as well as devilishly ironic. "Hercules" is a cautionary tale about celebrity from Disney, the premier manufacturer of the stuff.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1991
PSYCHIKO, Greece -- Choosing words that have fired the mind for centuries, the teacher started writing on the blackboard and the students concentrated as the opening lines of Homer's "Odyssey" appeared."
NEWS
By Michael James | October 3, 1990
WANTED: Traveling Bard to provide inspiration at an office in need of musical enlightenment.The qualified candidate will possess his/her own lyre and must be versed in ancient Greek poetry. Voice must be soft and lilting. Minstrels a plus but not necessary.Added consideration will be given to those who have a whimsical view of Howard County happenings and various news events that shape the daily lives of those who work in the county mainstream.We offer an excellent benefits package and pleasant working conditions, but no pay. The job will be rewarding to those whose mission is to use music as an inspirational force in the modern-day office structure.
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