Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAncient Egypt
IN THE NEWS

Ancient Egypt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1996
It's an occasion that would somehow seem more appropriate for the second Sunday in May, but for a reason only they understand, two cable TV operations seem to have settled on today as "Mummy's Day."(OK, I know it's a lame play on words, but it got your attention, didn't it?)The fun begins at 8 p.m. on Arts & Entertainment with episode No. 1 of "Mummies," a two-part, four-hour look at ancient Egyptian history through the preserved remains of their leaders.Tonight's episode, which airs from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., looks at the process of mummification itself: How -- and why -- did the Egyptians do it?
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge and Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge,Morning Call | February 18, 2007
PHILADELPHIA / / The boy king's burial bling is back for another fling. Golden treasures from the tomb of Tutankhamun, who ruled ancient Egypt from ages 9 to 19, are touring the United States for the first time since the late 1970s, when Tut mania had visitors camping overnight outside museums and Steve Martin danced the Tut watusi on Saturday Night Live. Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, an exhibition of 130 objects from the final resting places of King Tut and other royal relatives in the 18th Dynasty (1555 B.C. to 1305 B.C.)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
Deep inside the Walters Art Gallery, archaeologist Stephen Harvey is directing an excavation. There are no shovels or trowels involved; no sandy, sun-baked pits. But hundreds of ancient Egyptian objects are nonetheless being rediscovered one by one, dusted off and scrutinized.Harvey is excavating the Walters' storage vaults.No Egyptologist has ever really done this -- because until Harvey was hired last September, the museum did not employ one.The Walters long has been renowned for its illuminated manuscripts.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
No one is sure when cats first adopted humans - entering our homes and picking a favorite spot to be admired, fed and stroked. But researchers digging on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus have unearthed a 9,500-year-old feline skeleton, buried intact near the remains of a human. That's about 3,000 years earlier than previous evidence of a cat-human association. A team of French scientists announced yesterday that the specimen of an 8-month-old Felis silvestris, uncovered in a Neolithic village, was considerably larger than most of today's domestic varieties - about the size of a modern African wildcat.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 13, 1996
Gazing at the curious markings on the stone behind the glass exhibit case, Arnold Lehman focuses on the recurrent ones that look like a familiar punctuation mark for anyone who's taken even grade school English."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and By Gary Vikan,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2001
"The Mummy Congress: Science, Obsession, and the Everlasting Dead," by Heather Pringle. Theia. 368 pages. $23.95. This gruesomely compelling book, written by a science journalist and frequent contributor to Discover magazine, is devoted to an eccentric group of about 200 scientists who convene every three years in some exotic spot naturally conducive to mummification -- most recently, in the little Chilean town of Aria, bordering the driest place on...
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 16, 2002
Ancient Egypt was a society preoccupied by death, but as a child growing up in Richmond during the 1950s, Betsy Bryan didn't think of it like that. For her it was pure wonder. "The way they had it set up [at the Richmond Museum], it was dark, and the objects really stood out. It was like a secret that I didn't know about," Bryan recalled. "And what I really wanted to know about was how to read the hieroglyphs." Today, Bryan is a Johns Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies and, as one of two curators for the National Gallery of Art's current show The Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt, she is one of the world's acknowledged experts on ancient Egyptian writing as well as art. The show, which opened last month, brings together some 115 ceremonial and religious objects from Egyptian museums and archaeological sites, plus a life-sized reconstruction of the burial chamber of the ancient ruler Thutmose III (1479-1425 B.C.)
NEWS
November 10, 1994
ONCE again, courtesy of the New York Times News Service, we bring you highlights of world history compiled from student papers by Richard Lederer, an English teacher in Concord, N.H. The following excerpts are reprinted from Mr. Lederer's book, "Anguished English," published by Wyrick & Co. of Charleston, S.C.:"During the Renaissance America began. Christopher Columbus was a great navigator who discovered America while cursing the Atlantic. His ships were called the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Fe."
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,Sun Art Critic | September 22, 2002
Though Central and South America are often described familiarly as the United States' back yard, we actually know far less about the pre-Columbian cultures that once flourished there than we do about, say, ancient Egypt. Perhaps that's why a new long-term exhibition opening today at the Walters Art Museum looks so strange to modern eyes. Titled Art of the Ancient Americas, the exhibit presents more than 100 objects spanning some 3,000 years of pre-Columbian history. The show is made possible by an extraordinary 10-year loan from the Austen-Stokes Ancient Americas Foundation, which owns one of the world's premier collections of ancient American art. But though much of pre-Columbian art is contemporaneous with the art of ancient Egypt, we have only recently begun to penetrate its mysteries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holland Cotter and By Holland Cotter,New York Times News Service | July 7, 2002
Just over 25 years ago, The Treasures of Tutankhamen opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington and set a model for the must-see museum event. The show came with sensational art, a sexy story line (teen-age pharaoh, archaeological derring-do, a curse from beyond the grave) and a monumental dose of promotional spin. Attendance was staggering. The blockbuster was born. The Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt, which opened June 30 at the same museum, is clearly designed to give its predecessor a run for the money, and those hopes are not entirely misplaced.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | October 5, 2003
Life in ancient Egypt, the Court of Versailles or 1960s Baltimore was a hair-raising experience. Really. Perhaps in no other eras has the female coiffure reached such, well, heights, towering actual feet above the wearer's skull line. There are hairdos on display in the Eternal Egypt exhibit at the Walters Art Museum (running through Jan. 18, 2004) that would make Hairspray heroine Tracy Turnblad sick with envy. For instance, there is the Shabti statuette of a woman who appears to be wearing what only could be described as a black fright wig that would put most punk rockers to shame.
NEWS
By Caroline F. Campion and Caroline F. Campion,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Hidden within one of the most benign of New York establishments, the neighborhood deli, dwells a silent killer. Crouched beneath the ice cream freezer or curled in innocent repose between the aisles of condiments and canned soup, he waits patiently for his moment to pounce. Not only have many New Yorkers been face to face with this cunning deli dweller, some have been known to reach out a hand and, yes, rub the fiend behind the ear. The fiend in question is not insidious bacteria or even Steven Seagal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,Sun Art Critic | September 22, 2002
Though Central and South America are often described familiarly as the United States' back yard, we actually know far less about the pre-Columbian cultures that once flourished there than we do about, say, ancient Egypt. Perhaps that's why a new long-term exhibition opening today at the Walters Art Museum looks so strange to modern eyes. Titled Art of the Ancient Americas, the exhibit presents more than 100 objects spanning some 3,000 years of pre-Columbian history. The show is made possible by an extraordinary 10-year loan from the Austen-Stokes Ancient Americas Foundation, which owns one of the world's premier collections of ancient American art. But though much of pre-Columbian art is contemporaneous with the art of ancient Egypt, we have only recently begun to penetrate its mysteries.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 16, 2002
Ancient Egypt was a society preoccupied by death, but as a child growing up in Richmond during the 1950s, Betsy Bryan didn't think of it like that. For her it was pure wonder. "The way they had it set up [at the Richmond Museum], it was dark, and the objects really stood out. It was like a secret that I didn't know about," Bryan recalled. "And what I really wanted to know about was how to read the hieroglyphs." Today, Bryan is a Johns Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies and, as one of two curators for the National Gallery of Art's current show The Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt, she is one of the world's acknowledged experts on ancient Egyptian writing as well as art. The show, which opened last month, brings together some 115 ceremonial and religious objects from Egyptian museums and archaeological sites, plus a life-sized reconstruction of the burial chamber of the ancient ruler Thutmose III (1479-1425 B.C.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holland Cotter and By Holland Cotter,New York Times News Service | July 7, 2002
Just over 25 years ago, The Treasures of Tutankhamen opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington and set a model for the must-see museum event. The show came with sensational art, a sexy story line (teen-age pharaoh, archaeological derring-do, a curse from beyond the grave) and a monumental dose of promotional spin. Attendance was staggering. The blockbuster was born. The Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt, which opened June 30 at the same museum, is clearly designed to give its predecessor a run for the money, and those hopes are not entirely misplaced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and By Gary Vikan,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2001
"The Mummy Congress: Science, Obsession, and the Everlasting Dead," by Heather Pringle. Theia. 368 pages. $23.95. This gruesomely compelling book, written by a science journalist and frequent contributor to Discover magazine, is devoted to an eccentric group of about 200 scientists who convene every three years in some exotic spot naturally conducive to mummification -- most recently, in the little Chilean town of Aria, bordering the driest place on...
TRAVEL
By Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge and Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge,Morning Call | February 18, 2007
PHILADELPHIA / / The boy king's burial bling is back for another fling. Golden treasures from the tomb of Tutankhamun, who ruled ancient Egypt from ages 9 to 19, are touring the United States for the first time since the late 1970s, when Tut mania had visitors camping overnight outside museums and Steve Martin danced the Tut watusi on Saturday Night Live. Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, an exhibition of 130 objects from the final resting places of King Tut and other royal relatives in the 18th Dynasty (1555 B.C. to 1305 B.C.)
FEATURES
November 8, 1998
Barbie on boardEver wonder where the ubiquitous Barbie doll will show up next? Now it seems she's taking a cruise. Carnival Cruise Lines has teamed up with toy maker Mattel to bring us the Carnival Cruise Barbie doll.The $45 doll, available in shops aboard Carnival's ships, wears sunglasses and a nautical-themed sports ensemble: white shorts, a red-and-white striped crop top and a short red, white and navy blue jacket with gold trim. But wait ... can those be Carnival logos emblazoned on her shorts?
FEATURES
November 8, 1998
Barbie on boardEver wonder where the ubiquitous Barbie doll will show up next? Now it seems she's taking a cruise. Carnival Cruise Lines has teamed up with toy maker Mattel to bring us the Carnival Cruise Barbie doll.The $45 doll, available in shops aboard Carnival's ships, wears sunglasses and a nautical-themed sports ensemble: white shorts, a red-and-white striped crop top and a short red, white and navy blue jacket with gold trim. But wait ... can those be Carnival logos emblazoned on her shorts?
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
Deep inside the Walters Art Gallery, archaeologist Stephen Harvey is directing an excavation. There are no shovels or trowels involved; no sandy, sun-baked pits. But hundreds of ancient Egyptian objects are nonetheless being rediscovered one by one, dusted off and scrutinized.Harvey is excavating the Walters' storage vaults.No Egyptologist has ever really done this -- because until Harvey was hired last September, the museum did not employ one.The Walters long has been renowned for its illuminated manuscripts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.