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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 1, 2002
There's not a shovel in sight. No picks, no tape measures. No carefully dug trenches with scientists intently peering at the earth. But at the Walters Art Museum, an excavation of sorts is under way. Like an archaeologist on a dig in rarely visited territory, Regine Schulz is combing the exhibition cases at the Walters and exploring its storage vaults. She's examining hundreds of Egyptian antiquities, from 3-inch bronzes to large stone reliefs. She's gently uncovering them and eyeing them closely.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 11, 2009
Talk about traveling first-class. Four slabs of marble and two clay vases bound for Baltimore received exit visas issued by the Hellenic minister of culture himself. They were driven to the airport in Athens, Greece, in a truck with a suspension so steady that a plastic cup of water didn't spill a drop. And the van received a police escort, just to make sure that nothing untoward occurred. None of that stopped Eleni Vlachogianni's pulse from pounding on the recent day when she unlocked the cases in which the treasures were enclosed.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
ELKO, Nev. - They improvise on topics from politics to love, making their points in rhythmic, rhyming stanzas. Get them together on a stage and they're likely to try to one-up each other with good-natured insults that grow more outrageous with each verse. Basque poets may be the original rappers. Basque poetry is an ancient art, with antecedents that date to the 15th century, but it is as current as the news. Now, a group of Basque-American poets who have kept this native art alive in their adopted country have been selected for an award from the National Endowment for the Arts for their work, though the official ceremony scheduled for yesterday in Washington was postponed because of Hurricane Isabel.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS | July 20, 2008
When University of Maryland medical school graduate Giraud Foster became the personal physician to the king of Yemen in 1961, he developed a strong interest in that ancient land and a passion for archaeology that stayed with him for life. Between 1961 and 1971, Foster and his wife, Carolyn, acquired more than 60 sculptures, statues, relief carvings and other treasures from the South Arabian peninsula - the area now known as Yemen - including two given to them by the last king, Imam Ahmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 22, 2004
Renewed purpose Industrial and commercial scraps have been recycled into works of art in Surplus, a new show at Area 405. The exhibit, which features a number of pieces made from old materials left in a local warehouse, is on view through Aug. 1. Area 405 is at 405 E. Oliver St. Hours are noon-3 p.m. Sundays and by appointment. Call 410-528-2101 or visit www.area405.com. Body of art The human form is the focus of Go Figure, a mixed-media show at the Maryland Federation of Art's Circle Gallery in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Kirsten Valle and Kirsten Valle,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Athena, peering from a glass case marked with a tiny red laurel, is the first stop. She's small and modest, as is the signature owl on her arm, frozen for centuries in bronze contemplation. Then there are the vases, awash in orange and black, the headless, marble-muscled statues and the bronze-cast figurines, all sinewy limbs and weathered reminders of the world's original heroes: the earliest Olympic athletes. The Heroes of the Ancient Games, an array of ancient Greek art that opens as a walking tour tomorrow at the Walters Art Museum and continues through September, celebrates a time before worries of security and steroids, before the duel of amateur vs. professional and before 2004 sends the Olympics back to Athens.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 24, 1998
The Scythians were an ancient nomadic people who occupied present-day Ukraine north of the Black Sea. They prospered from the fifth to the third century B.C., and they made magnificent objects of gold -- jewelry, weapons, horse trappings and ceremonial objects.The Walters Art Gallery will announce today that in the spring of 2000, it will present "Scythian Gold: Treasures from Ancient Ukraine," an exhibit of 165 Scythian works, most of which have been discovered in recent years and never before seen in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | September 18, 2003
NOW OR NEVER Renowned art scholar David Driskell will present a slide lecture Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Driskell, a professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, is known as one of the world's leading experts on African-American art. His presentation will address the purchase of African-American artwork by museums and private collectors. In addition, he will discuss the BMA's most recent acquisitions, including paintings by Henry Ossawa Tanner and Hale Woodruff.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 3, 1996
The exhibit "Pandora's Box: Women in Classical Greece," which ends its run at the Walters Art Gallery on Sunday, must be counted as one of Baltimore's most successful art shows, ever.Critics have loved it. So have scholars. Attendance is expected to greatly exceed pre-opening estimates. Financially, there's a chance the show will come close to breaking even, a rarity for museum shows. Even the bulky catalog, weighing in at a hefty $39.95 for the paperback, has sold three times as many copies as the pre-exhibit estimate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 11, 2009
Talk about traveling first-class. Four slabs of marble and two clay vases bound for Baltimore received exit visas issued by the Hellenic minister of culture himself. They were driven to the airport in Athens, Greece, in a truck with a suspension so steady that a plastic cup of water didn't spill a drop. And the van received a police escort, just to make sure that nothing untoward occurred. None of that stopped Eleni Vlachogianni's pulse from pounding on the recent day when she unlocked the cases in which the treasures were enclosed.
FEATURES
By Claudia Luther and Claudia Luther,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2007
Marcel Marceau, the great French mime who for seven decades mastered silence and brought new life to an ancient art form, has died. He was 84. Mr. Marceau died Saturday in Paris, French news media reported, citing his former assistant, Emmanuel Vacca. The cause of death was not disclosed. Yesterday, French Prime Minister Francois Fillon praised Mr. Marceau as "the master," saying he had the rare gift of "being able to communicate with each and everyone beyond the barriers of language." Active until late in his life, Mr. Marceau toured the world for more than half a century, giving more than 15,000 performances.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2007
In 12th century China, a Taoist monk known as Chang San-Feng is said to have studied the physical movements of five animals and concluded that two - the snake and the crane - were best-suited to overpower opponents who were fierce and tenacious. From that ancient observation, the slow, graceful movements of tai chi were born. Today, with the art and exercise of tai chi growing in popularity across the United States, scientists have found that older adults who practice this martial art strengthen themselves against an opponent as stubborn as any - the tiny chickenpox virus, which can cause a painful and often persistent nerve inflammation called shingles.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
In the midst of life-threatening illness, Lisa McGann turned to art for solace and renewal. At a farm field near her Bel Air home, she stumbled onto a natural medium that has formed the background for what she calls "stories." McGann burns images onto dried gourds. Her canvas can be an ordinary pumpkin or squash, or unusual gourds with names that describe their shapes - gooseneck, nest egg and cannonball - or speak to their origin, such as African kettle and Corsican. "I started telling my story on the gourds, but it's really everyone's story," said McGann, a 44-year-old mother of three.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
In the largest study of acupuncture to date, researchers have found the 2,000-year-old Chinese treatment can supplement traditional therapies to help relieve pain and improve function in patients with arthritis of the knee. Patients who had 23 sessions of acupuncture over six months reported significantly better knee function by the eighth week of treatment and a marked decrease in pain by the 14th week. The results of the trial, published today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, validate, at least to some extent, what many Americans already believe: Acupuncture works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 22, 2004
Renewed purpose Industrial and commercial scraps have been recycled into works of art in Surplus, a new show at Area 405. The exhibit, which features a number of pieces made from old materials left in a local warehouse, is on view through Aug. 1. Area 405 is at 405 E. Oliver St. Hours are noon-3 p.m. Sundays and by appointment. Call 410-528-2101 or visit www.area405.com. Body of art The human form is the focus of Go Figure, a mixed-media show at the Maryland Federation of Art's Circle Gallery in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Kirsten Valle and Kirsten Valle,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Athena, peering from a glass case marked with a tiny red laurel, is the first stop. She's small and modest, as is the signature owl on her arm, frozen for centuries in bronze contemplation. Then there are the vases, awash in orange and black, the headless, marble-muscled statues and the bronze-cast figurines, all sinewy limbs and weathered reminders of the world's original heroes: the earliest Olympic athletes. The Heroes of the Ancient Games, an array of ancient Greek art that opens as a walking tour tomorrow at the Walters Art Museum and continues through September, celebrates a time before worries of security and steroids, before the duel of amateur vs. professional and before 2004 sends the Olympics back to Athens.
FEATURES
By Claudia Luther and Claudia Luther,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2007
Marcel Marceau, the great French mime who for seven decades mastered silence and brought new life to an ancient art form, has died. He was 84. Mr. Marceau died Saturday in Paris, French news media reported, citing his former assistant, Emmanuel Vacca. The cause of death was not disclosed. Yesterday, French Prime Minister Francois Fillon praised Mr. Marceau as "the master," saying he had the rare gift of "being able to communicate with each and everyone beyond the barriers of language." Active until late in his life, Mr. Marceau toured the world for more than half a century, giving more than 15,000 performances.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS | July 20, 2008
When University of Maryland medical school graduate Giraud Foster became the personal physician to the king of Yemen in 1961, he developed a strong interest in that ancient land and a passion for archaeology that stayed with him for life. Between 1961 and 1971, Foster and his wife, Carolyn, acquired more than 60 sculptures, statues, relief carvings and other treasures from the South Arabian peninsula - the area now known as Yemen - including two given to them by the last king, Imam Ahmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | September 21, 2003
He looks so familiar, the square-chinned man who's staring straight ahead as he has for nearly 3,900 years, his eyes heavy, his firm mouth slightly turned down. Sesostris III, king of Egypt, neither young nor old, has the bearing worthy of his office. He looks irrefutably royal, powerful in every way, including the musculature of his chest. A workshop of sculptors carved at least six life-size granite statues of him sometime during Sesostris' reign, beginning in 1874 B.C. It was roughly the midpoint, and politically and economically the high point, of ancient Egypt's Middle Kingdom.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
ELKO, Nev. - They improvise on topics from politics to love, making their points in rhythmic, rhyming stanzas. Get them together on a stage and they're likely to try to one-up each other with good-natured insults that grow more outrageous with each verse. Basque poets may be the original rappers. Basque poetry is an ancient art, with antecedents that date to the 15th century, but it is as current as the news. Now, a group of Basque-American poets who have kept this native art alive in their adopted country have been selected for an award from the National Endowment for the Arts for their work, though the official ceremony scheduled for yesterday in Washington was postponed because of Hurricane Isabel.
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