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By Shawn M. Lockhart and Shawn M. Lockhart,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
A MEMORABLE PLACESince 1995, summer has found me walking alone with my life on my back in the wilds of County Clare, on the west coast of Ireland. Clare, home of my distant bloodlines, had persistently beckoned to me over the years, until, finally, I answered the call.Each year I ready myself for yet another part of this continuing journey, this pilgrimage of the heart ... searching for something I have lost, recovering my long-lost self, not knowing from one year to the next if I can even return at all, what with life's twists and turns being what they are. But it seems some greater hand is moving me there once again.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 30, 2014
The political practices of the Islamic State are terrifying: kidnapping, ransoming, ethnic cleansing and, of course, beheading. These people must be vanquished. But equally frightening is the group's key premise. Like many reactionary movements, ISIS feeds upon and nurtures the dangerous notion that somehow the world, or at least the parts over which they claim authority, can somehow be restored to an earlier, idyllic era — in this case, the 8th century. ISIS can chop off all the heads members want, but here's a newsflash for them: Try as they might to reverse history, time marches in but one direction.
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NEWS
By PHOTOS BY ANDRM-I F. CHUNG and PHOTOS BY ANDRM-I F. CHUNG,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | January 16, 2006
Every Saturday, a class meets at the Columbia Gym in Harper's Choice to practice kendo, a Japanese martial art that is similar to fencing. Stemming from the ancient samurai tradition, kendo instruction is compulsory for Japanese children in primary school. Now it is a sport, and contenders compete in tournaments from the regional level all the way up to the international level. Matches last from three to four minutes and never end in a tie. Men and women compete against each other, but women can compete only against other women if they choose.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 6, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - A major early civilization - rivaling in sophistication the ones that emerged in the Indus Valley or Mesopotamia, the famed Cradle of Civilization - apparently thrived in central Asia between 2200 B.C. and 1800 B.C. These people, who lived in desert oases in what is now Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, used irrigation to grow wheat and barley, forged distinctive metal axes, carved alabaster and marble into intricate sculptures, and painted pottery...
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
By studying traces of ancient starlight, astronomers are gaining a better understanding of how the infant universe took shape - a step toward answering questions about the nature of space, time and energy as defined by Einstein's theories. But the deeper in space that scientists try to probe, the murkier things become. Even with ever-improving technology, the oldest stars are still too distant to observe directly. In probing this and other enigmatic phenomena, astronomers often make assumptions based on what the latest instruments reveal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1991
NUWEIBA, Egypt -- From the start, running the Taba Hilton was a challenge. When Neil Mathieson took over as general manager of the resort hotel almost two years ago, Israel had just been forced to hand the Taba enclave at Israel's southern tip back to Egypt after years of argument and negotiation.Bitter and angry, Israeli tourists, the hotel's only natural clientele, stopped coming. And they began to return only after more than a year of coaxing, price cuts and carefully crafted package deals.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 16, 2005
Excavations at a ruined city on the plains of northeastern Syria have turned up the oldest known example of large-scale warfare -- an ancient campaign that pummeled the city into submission at the dawn of civilization more than 5,500 years ago, researchers said yesterday. The discovery of the devastated remains of the ancient trading center suggests that the urge to attack and conquer cities is as old and basic as the need to build them, the researchers said. "This clearly was no minor skirmish," said archaeologist Clemens Reichel of the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, who led the team of archeologists who made the discovery.
NEWS
By Rita Giordano and Rita Giordano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 21, 2001
PHILADELPHIA--Trowels in hand, the student archaeologists had settled down to the day's dig when Katie Gerbner, 18, spied a blue-trimmed vase and peered inside. "Guys, there's coins in here," Gerbner announced. "Katie," said their teacher, Matt Glendinning, "how many are there, and can you see anything on them?" "They're Roman," Gerbner said. Gerbner and her 15 Germantown Friends School classmates would say they are on an adventure that's the next best thing to a real archaeological dig. The students had embarked on a discovery mission that ultimately will span ancient Greece to the Middle Ages.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BAIRAGHAR, India --Plenty of women might feel they deserve an award for marrying their husbands, but Madhavi Arwar is actually getting one - from the Indian government, no less. Not that her husband, Chandrashekhar, is a bad sort. In fact, he's good-looking, holds a steady job at an insurance company and dotes on their apple-cheeked son. But he is also a Dalit, or an "untouchable," the lowest of the low under India's ancient caste system. Madhavi is not, and for marrying "down" the social ladder, she is entitled to $250 in cash, plus a certificate of appreciation.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Walking through a giant hall in the Baltimore Convention Center, Susan Johnson and Sherry Mills stopped to admire a bronze-and-steel sculpture with water cascading out of it. "I need this," Mills said. "You may want to come around this side first," Johnson said, nodding at a sticker announcing the water feature's $18,000 price. The sculpture by San Francisco artist Michael Szabo was among the many pricey items at the American Craft Council show this weekend. Others among the 650 crafts people at the event were showing high-end jewelry, paintings, furniture and glassware, with prices reaching into the tens of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Georg H.B. Luck, whose career teaching the classics at the Johns Hopkins University spanned two decades and included studying the role magic and witchcraft played in the theology and world of the ancient Greeks and Romans, died Sunday from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87 and a longtime resident of the city's Poplar Hill neighborhood. "Georg was a modest man who had great gusto for the things that interested him," said Richard A. Macksey, a noted Baltimore bibliophile and professor of humanities at Hopkins.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2013
As we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, we are reminded that equality is unconditional, something we basically knew from the start.  And it wasn't born out of the Great Charter of the Liberties of England, or the Magna Carta; the Declaration of Independence; the Constitution or even the Bill of Rights. Rather, as Abraham Lincoln said in the movie "Lincoln": "it was right there all the time; there in Euclid's (Father of Geometry) 'Elements,' a 2,000-year-old book of mechanical law. " In fact, Abraham Lincoln, who explored and wrestled with passage of the 13th Amendment focusing on the abolition of slavery, unflinchingly put Euclid this way in the movie "Lincoln": "Things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | December 2, 2012
The Ravens were fortunate that Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger didn't play Sunday because the score might have been worse. Much worse. In the past couple of weeks, the Ravens had the football gods smiling down on them, but Sunday they were beaten by a quarterback older than Moses. Some say Charlie Batch was playing in the NFL when there were no facemasks on helmets. There is speculation he has filed for Medicare and Social Security. But Batch, 37, outperformed his much younger and sometimes more talented counterpart Joe Flacco as Pittsburgh upset the Ravens, 23-20, before 71,442 at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
The Howard County school board's apology for the era of segregated schools seems at first blush a magnanimous gesture of reconciliation ("Howard school board apologizes for segregation," Nov. 16). But on further reflection, it doesn't jibe with the board's more recent history. While addressing issues from a dark, bygone era of racial inequality may be cathartic, those who created and perpetuated that social order are long gone. But present day board members need only look back to 2009, when they were party to the widespread disrespect of President Barack Obama by making students' attendance at his welcome back to school address optional.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
An authentic Indiana Jones is alive and well, right here in town. Baltimore, meet Douglas Comer. Operating rather inconspicuously from his Charles Village-based firm Cultural Site Research and Management, Comer has overseen some of the region's most important archaeological and historical preservation projects. That's when he's not spur-of-the-moment globetrotting to a newly discovered archaeology site or to play watchdog over the preservation of some of the Earth's most-treasured archaeological finds.
FEATURES
By Tina Kelley and Tina Kelley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1996
SEATTLE -- His bones lay for 93 centuries in a bed of fine Columbia River sand that held them gently, without compressing or distorting them. He was middle-aged when he died, say the few scientists who have seen him. He had all his teeth, and a spear tip embedded two inches deep in his pelvis.And, they say, his face had somewhat Caucasian features.He is called Kennewick Man, after the southern Washington town where he was discovered this past summer, and he is at once one of the biggest anthropological finds and frustrations in years.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
He doesn't much look like it now, at 85, what with the thinning hair, stooped shoulders and sweat pants hitched up nearly chest-high beneath his British prep school blazer. And, safari suit notwithstanding, Basil Saffer didn't much look like it then, either: bespectacled, slight Englishman that he was, three cameras dangling from his neck as he roamed ancient lands in a 20-year quest for treasure - or at least what he viewed as such. "The Indiana Jones of Brick" they called him, and some still do - a testament not to Harrison Ford-like looks, not to particularly swashbuckling adventures, but to Saffer's determined and meticulous efforts to research, seek out, obtain and preserve ancient brick.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Showing her knack for timing, director Christy Stanlake has announced the U.S. Naval Academy Masqueraders will bookend Halloween with weekend performances of "Titus Andronicus" — "Shakespeare's first and bloodiest play" is the way she describes it — Oct. 26-27 and Nov. 2-4 at Mahan Theatre on campus. In her 11th year as Masqueraders director, Stanlake, who is also an associate professor, is known for her insightful and courageous choices of plays. When she came aboard in fall 2002, Stanlake immediately displayed vision by focusing on the role of female military leadership in George Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
Except for the spout sticking up from its backbone, the reddish-brown clay dog bears a striking resemblance to the Chihauhau curled up in front of your fireplace. There's the whiplike tail that's been temporarily stilled, the ears cocked sleepily in the direction of a faraway sound. An observer would almost expect that pup's nose to be moist and its tongue warm. Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? This drowsy canine just leaped over 18 centuries. One of the delights of "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas," the new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum , is that it creates common ground between contemporary humans and the ancestors from whom we are separated by four millennia.
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