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By Sam Gugino and Sam Gugino,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
For $64,000, what dish (other than green salad and soupe du jour) graces more restaurant menus than any other? Why, Caesar salad, of course. I have no statistics to verify this, just a lot of observation.Twenty years ago, Caesar salad and steak seemed like the most common order in restaurants. Today, the steak -- and the martinis and cigarettes that went with it -- is as rare as a spotted owl. But Caesar salad is as popular as ever, maybe more so.However, while Caesar salad may be the most used restaurant dish, it may also be the most abused.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
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NEWS
By REGINA SCHRAMBLING and REGINA SCHRAMBLING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 6, 2006
The all-American dip, the dairy-based kind that clings to chips and crudites alike, is one of the most seductive innovations of that age of innocence, the 1950s. Now that fats have been partially rehabilitated, the classic dips look better than ever. Green Goddess evokes another era so powerfully it seems brand-new. An adaptation of a salad dressing invented in the 1920s at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, it is the most amazing blend of fresh herbs, herb-flavored vinegar, mayonnaise and a whole tin of anchovies - and when it's made fresh, it tastes like every one of those and much more.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
ARTHUR SCHWARTZ'S NEW YORK CITY FOOD An Opinionated History and More Than 100 Legendary Recipes By Arthur Schwartz Stewart, Tabori & Chang / 2008 / $27.50 Defining New York cuisine is as difficult as listing which are our most American dishes, for New York reflects the country's breadth, and its food is truly a sum of its parts, cooked by the immigrant cultures, new and old, that continue to make this teeming city great. Veteran food writer and New York native Arthur Schwartz fittingly details a culinary history from the Native Americans and Dutch straight through to final chapters on soul food, contemporary classics and the fare favored by the Russians, Koreans, West Indians, Greeks, South Asians, Poles and Mexicans who have flocked to the city in more recent decades.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | October 6, 1991
Even those who vow that they despise anchovies will love this quick-cooking sauce.Typically served on top of pasta, puttanesca sauce offers a flavorful blend of tomatoes, garlic, capers and olives that also can be used to perk up even the dullest of broiled chicken breasts.The history of this sauce is as rich as its flavor. It originated in the slums of Naples and supposedly was a favorite of the local prostitutes (puttanas) who, according to folklore, would prepare the sauce with pasta for their customers from items readily available in the kitchen.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2001
"What is this stuff?" When the fourth friend posed the same question during a restaurant review, I knew a remedial lesson was in order. The "stuff" is tapenade, and it is everywhere these days. It also is delicious. Tapenade is a spread traditionally made with black olives, anchovies, capers and olive oil. The ingredients are pureed and slathered on crusty bread as an appetizer. The spread originated in the sunny south of France, where the fixings are readily available. You probably won't find classic tapenade in many restaurants, though.
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimere and Linda Gassenheimere,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1992
For years northern Italian cuisine has captured the spotlight, but now Sicilian cooking is coming back into vogue. With vegetables, pasta, fish and bread as its staples, it fits right in with today's ideas about good food.The island of Sicily, situated just 3 miles off the toe of the Italian mainland, is dotted with groves of citrus fruit, olives and grapes. Its mountains create spectacular scenery, and it has miles of sandy beaches.Perciatelli -- a long, hollow pasta -- adds texture and flavor to our entree.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | April 28, 1992
THE FOLLOWING is from a cassette tape found under the pantry steps behind the Supreme Court building. Eight distinctive male voices are heard and one female. Fortunately, none can be identified with certainty:Male Voice One: Did anybody get a pastrami on white with mayonnaise and lettuce? I ordered pastrami with mayo and -- would you look at this revolting sandwich, Chief? Corned beef on rye with mustard. They must think we're writing a Broadway musical here instead of interpreting a Constitution.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 20, 1993
Zorba's 5631 Harford Road. Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday throughThursday, 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday,and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday.$ Call (410) 426-6082.What distinguishes a really good neighborhood from one that's merely so-so, in my opinion, is whether or not it has a first-rate pizza place that delivers. Zorba's fits that role for many folks in the Hamilton area. The Zorba Special pizza -- everything, including anchovies -- is outstanding ($9.95 small, $12.75 large). They also offer a Greek pizza (peppers, onions, feta cheese, $7.25 and $9.95)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | August 13, 2008
Yes, those jars of marinara sauce at the supermarket beckon when you are faced with the question, "What's for dinner?" But marinara is surprisingly easy to make and lends itself to many variations. I tried adding anchovies I had in the freezer to a can of crushed tomatoes recently for a weeknight meal. Their subtle flavor seemed to boost the taste of the tomatoes. Carol Mighton Haddix writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. LINGUINE WITH GARLIC MARINARA Makes 4 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small onion, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 anchovy fillets, finely chopped 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper, or to taste 1/4 cup each: dry white wine, water 1 can (28 ounces)
NEWS
By REGINA SCHRAMBLING and REGINA SCHRAMBLING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 6, 2006
The all-American dip, the dairy-based kind that clings to chips and crudites alike, is one of the most seductive innovations of that age of innocence, the 1950s. Now that fats have been partially rehabilitated, the classic dips look better than ever. Green Goddess evokes another era so powerfully it seems brand-new. An adaptation of a salad dressing invented in the 1920s at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, it is the most amazing blend of fresh herbs, herb-flavored vinegar, mayonnaise and a whole tin of anchovies - and when it's made fresh, it tastes like every one of those and much more.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2001
"What is this stuff?" When the fourth friend posed the same question during a restaurant review, I knew a remedial lesson was in order. The "stuff" is tapenade, and it is everywhere these days. It also is delicious. Tapenade is a spread traditionally made with black olives, anchovies, capers and olive oil. The ingredients are pureed and slathered on crusty bread as an appetizer. The spread originated in the sunny south of France, where the fixings are readily available. You probably won't find classic tapenade in many restaurants, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2000
SOMETIMES a restaurant abounds with so much charm and goodwill that it seems petty to find any fault with it at all. Simon's, on Fairmount Avenue in Butcher's Hill, is just such a place. We circled around the one-way streets of Butcher's Hill, a lovely old neighborhood, until we came upon Simon's warm glow in the quiet of the night. Even from the outside, the restaurant is beguiling. The tiny, historic building - originally a tavern - has been painted a warm and welcoming rose color and has whimsical stucco garlands above the long, narrow front window.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
What did you do on your summer vacation? Lounge at the beach? Hike the trails around Aspen? Visit Hershey Park? If so, you had a fairly typical family holiday. Or did you spend your time off sticking potato strips on soft-shell crabs on Anguilla, taking pictures of plates of food in Venice or tasting barrel samples with winemakers in the Napa Valley? Then you must be a food professional. Because those were ideal idyllic vacation activities for some local chefs and caterers, who say they devote 50 to 100 percent of their time away from work exploring the wide world of food and wine.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 1995
There are few foods that inspire poetry at my family's supper table. Cauliflower was one. When I was kid growing up in the Midwest, as soon as my dad saw a bowl of cauliflower he would recite a poem in its honor.The poem went something like "See the little cauliflower, growing sweeter by the hour."As he recited the verses my dad would push a bowl of steaming cauliflower in front of me and and my three brothers. We would recoil. Cauliflower was a vegetable and, therefore, not to be trusted.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
ARTHUR SCHWARTZ'S NEW YORK CITY FOOD An Opinionated History and More Than 100 Legendary Recipes By Arthur Schwartz Stewart, Tabori & Chang / 2008 / $27.50 Defining New York cuisine is as difficult as listing which are our most American dishes, for New York reflects the country's breadth, and its food is truly a sum of its parts, cooked by the immigrant cultures, new and old, that continue to make this teeming city great. Veteran food writer and New York native Arthur Schwartz fittingly details a culinary history from the Native Americans and Dutch straight through to final chapters on soul food, contemporary classics and the fare favored by the Russians, Koreans, West Indians, Greeks, South Asians, Poles and Mexicans who have flocked to the city in more recent decades.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | April 8, 1995
Some memorable fishing experiences on the Chesapeake Bay, which now need revising:* Hooking huge weakfish on a hot summer night, until my wrists ached, on the edge of the main ship channel in midbay. They hit the deck, bellies bulging, literally coughing up quantities of a tiny bait fish that seemed unimportant in the flush of the moment.* A frigid winter day -- and night, and another day -- fishing with gill nets nonstop amid ice floes with the bay's biggest rockfish netter, piling up stripers by the ton. They too hit the deck spitting up a tiny bait fish on which they had been gorging in the icy depths of the upper Chesapeake.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 20, 1993
Zorba's 5631 Harford Road. Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday throughThursday, 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday,and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday.$ Call (410) 426-6082.What distinguishes a really good neighborhood from one that's merely so-so, in my opinion, is whether or not it has a first-rate pizza place that delivers. Zorba's fits that role for many folks in the Hamilton area. The Zorba Special pizza -- everything, including anchovies -- is outstanding ($9.95 small, $12.75 large). They also offer a Greek pizza (peppers, onions, feta cheese, $7.25 and $9.95)
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