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May 5, 1995
WJZ anchorman Al Sanders was hospitalized and listed in critical condition yesterday, according to statement from station management."Al Sanders is back in the hospital after undergoing several weeks of outpatient chemotherapy treatment for lung cancer," WJZ Vice President and General Manager Marcellus Alexander said.4 "His condition has unexpectedly turned critical."Family, friends and all of us at WJZ TV ask you to join us in praying for his well-being. We ask that the privacy of his family be respected at this time," Mr. Alexander concluded.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
 An Emmy-winning actor, Peabody Award-winning documentarian and longtime CBS anchorman are among the seven personalities coming to town for the 2014-15 Baltimore Speakers Series. The Tuesday-evening series, presented by Stevenson University, kicks off Sept. 30 with Alan Alda, the Emmy-winning star of CBS's landmark TV series "M*A*S*H," and ends April 28, 2015 with former CBS anchorman Dan Rather. Other speakers in the series include former Australia Prime Minister Julia Gillard (Oct.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Kenneth Manelis, a weekend news anchorman for WBAL-AM radio who was known for his calm demeanor on breaking news stories, died Monday after a short illness at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson.Mr. Manelis, 48, of Pikesville had been with the radio station off and on for nearly 20 years. He last anchored the news the weekend of March 28 and did rush-hour traffic reports early last month.He had worked part time at WBAL since 1990, combining his work as one of the station's newscasters with free-lance announcing duties; part-time, on-air work at Maryland Public Television; and acting jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
UPDATES (Nov. 30) AT END WITH JACKSON COMMENT. After 20 years at WJZ-TV anchorman Kai Jackson has informed management that he is leaving the station at the end of the year. Jackson co-anchors one-half of the 4 p.m. and all of the 5 p.m. weekday news on WJZ. He also reports for the 11 p.m. newscast. He is the second high-visibility anchor to leave the station this year. Adam May left WJZ for Al Jazeera America in May. WJZ president and general manager Jay Newman said no immediate replacement will be named.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Outside a mega-movie theater at the White Marsh mall, people are whispering and staring at the man with white frizzy hair. "You on Channel 13?" a young man asks as he takes a break from sweeping up litter. "What's your name?" It's Richard Sher, former anchor and longtime reporter at Baltimore's WJZ-TV, and he is just emerging on this warm July night from a special screening of Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. Starring Saturday Night Live alum Will Ferrell, the movie, which opens today, spoofs television news in the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 9, 2004
Bill Clinton may feel your pain, but no one feels his own pain better than Will Ferrell. In his equally flimsy and hilarious new vehicle Anchorman, he has a cataclysmic bout of grief on a pay phone that becomes more gut-wrenching and side-splitting with every passing second. His yowls nearly shatter the booth; his phone-mate could hear him if they were using tin cans attached to string. The hero of Anchorman, 1970s San Diego TV-news star Ron Burgundy, is a narcissist with a heart almost as big as his head.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 5, 2005
When an executive of long standing steps down, his farewell typically is accompanied by toasts, kudos and kind recollections. But the departure of 73-year-old anchorman Dan Rather from the CBS Evening News instead is generating an unprecedented wave of harsh assessments - and not just from longtime critics. Voiced by many of the anchorman's peers and former colleagues, the negative comments resonate with anger toward Rather and are suffused with resentment over the blow to the credibility of the media dealt by a now-infamous 60 Minutes Wednesday report on the military career of President Bush.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 17, 2004
You've heard of the "Summer of Love" and the "Summer of Sam"? This year, the hot-weather season at the cinema could be called the "Summer of Arrogant Nitwits." From mainstream laugh-fests such as Anchorman, Dodgeball and Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle to such talked-about indie comedies as Napoleon Dynamite and Saved!, the big screen has been overrun by nincompoops with attitude. "For the last five or so years, there's been a particular genre of stupid movies that are just stupid for the sake of being stupid," says B.J. Sigesmund, movie editor for US Weekly.
NEWS
December 30, 1999
A photo caption in yesterday's Today section incorrectly listed Peter Jennings' network affiliation. Jennings will serve as anchorman for ABC's 24-hour Y2K coverage, broadcast locally on WMAR, Channel 2.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
May 15, 2004
Floyd Kalber, 79, a television news anchorman whose career included stints on NBC's Today show, died Thursday of emphysema, family members said. Mr. Kalber, a winner of five Emmy Awards, died at his home in the Chicago suburb of Burr Ridge. Mr. Kalber left WMAQ-TV in Chicago in 1976 after 16 years as the 10 p.m. anchorman to appear on the Today show in New York. He also worked as an NBC correspondent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimote Sun | April 9, 2012
We had a spirited discussion Sunday on CNN's  "Reliable Sources" about Keith Olbermann's suit against Al Gore's Current TV. The video is at the end of this post, and I urge you to take a look especially at what Sharon Waxman, founder of TheWrap, has to say about Olbermann having played his games maybe once too often. Here's something Olbermann should perhaps be even more worried about: the fact that to win his suit he is going to have to trash a liberal icon in Gore. And how are Olbermann's liberal fans (however many might be left)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | June 19, 2008
A TV wake of six days and five nights for NBC newsman Tim Russert came to an end yesterday with a moving memorial service on cable channel MSNBC. Aptly representative of the arc of Russert's life, those eulogizing the 58-year-old anchor of Meet the Press ranged from an elementary school nun in Buffalo, N.Y., to the stars of mainstream media and singer Bruce Springsteen. From the announcement of Russert's death shortly after 3:30 p.m. Friday to yesterday's service that began at 4 p.m., TV served one of its primary ritualistic functions as a medium of mourning, offering access and an outlet for the affection that millions of Americans felt for an ebullient anchorman - as well as the grief they experienced at his death.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | November 14, 2006
It was only a matter of minutes before the first "Ratherism" was uttered. Dan Rather, the 75-year-old former CBS anchorman, was describing the start-up news operation that he has built at Mark Cuban's HDNet channel since his stormy departure five months ago from the network he had called home for 44 years. Dan Rather Reports will premiere at 8 tonight on the HDNet channel. More information on the channel can be found at www.hd.net.
FEATURES
March 6, 2006
March 6 1857: In its "Dred Scott" decision, the Supreme Court held that Scott, a slave, could not sue for his freedom in federal court. 1906: Comedian Lou Costello was born in Paterson, N.J. 1981: Walter Cronkite signed off for the last time as principal anchorman of the CBS Evening News.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 5, 2006
Amid all the buzz about "re-inventing the evening news" and the "death of the anchorman era," Bob Schieffer for the past year has gone steadfastly about doing what he does best: Reporting the news in a conventional, straightforward manner with a maximum of authority and a minimum of fuss. And the old-school, Texas newsman - who Friday will celebrate his first anniversary as interim anchor of the CBS Evening News - has enjoyed a year unmatched by anyone else in TV news. Although NBC and ABC have spent millions launching new anchors for their flagship broadcasts, their audiences are in sharp decline.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 30, 2005
Anchorman Peter Jennings, in a statement read last night on ABC World News Tonight, shared with viewers his feelings about his battle with lung cancer and expressed gratitude for the support he has received from fans and friends. The 66-year-old anchorman announced on the April 6 newscast that he had received the cancer diagnosis and shortly thereafter began treatment. "Thousands of you have spoiled me rotten with your attention in the last couple of weeks," Jennings said in a statement that was read on air by Elizabeth Vargas.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 23, 1991
IF TELEVISION had to cover pro football games the way it has to cover wars, what you see might go something like this:Anchorman: The heavily favored San Francisco 49ers have begun to show their superiority early in the championship game with the New York Giants. Let's go to Candlestick Park for an update.Reporter: Yes, Dan, the 49ers took the opening kickoff and drove straight down the field, racking up one first down after another.Anchorman: Bill, can you tell us some of the highlights?Reporter: Joe Montana completed five passes in that drive.
FEATURES
March 6, 2006
March 6 1857: In its "Dred Scott" decision, the Supreme Court held that Scott, a slave, could not sue for his freedom in federal court. 1906: Comedian Lou Costello was born in Paterson, N.J. 1981: Walter Cronkite signed off for the last time as principal anchorman of the CBS Evening News.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 10, 2005
An oasis of calm. That's what veteran newsman Bob Schieffer swears he'll deliver beginning tonight, when he takes over from Dan Rather as anchorman of the CBS Evening News. Though the 68-year-old Washington correspondent and longtime host of Face the Nation steps into the post temporarily, virtually everyone in the television industry is hailing his appointment as the smartest move CBS News has made in a long time - and no one at CBS has mentioned an end date. When Schieffer takes the anchor chair, the Evening News will be transformed overnight from a broadcast dominated by the most polarizing anchorman in network television history to one featuring what may be the medium's most neutral and reassuring announcer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 5, 2005
When an executive of long standing steps down, his farewell typically is accompanied by toasts, kudos and kind recollections. But the departure of 73-year-old anchorman Dan Rather from the CBS Evening News instead is generating an unprecedented wave of harsh assessments - and not just from longtime critics. Voiced by many of the anchorman's peers and former colleagues, the negative comments resonate with anger toward Rather and are suffused with resentment over the blow to the credibility of the media dealt by a now-infamous 60 Minutes Wednesday report on the military career of President Bush.
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