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By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Cranberry Station Elementary School's original contractor filed a defamation suit yesterday against top Carroll County school officials, claiming they falsely accused him of being unable to finish the project on time or within budget.James W. Ancel Inc. of Towson took issue with statements made at a public meeting last month by Superintendent William H. Hyde, Assistant Superintendent Vernon F. Smith Jr. and school board attorney Louis J. Kozlakowski, who argued that Ancel's contract was terminated because of scheduling concerns and disputes over rock removal and steel work.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that the Harborview condo association must pay the owner of one of the tower's penthouses more than $15,500 each month for failing to complete maintenance within a court-ordered deadline. Judge Emanuel Brown found the condo association in contempt of a 2011 award, upheld on appeal in 2013, that required the board to complete maintenance due to water infiltration in owner James W. Ancel, Sr.'s 27 t h floor unit. Ancel, the head of a Towson-based construction firm, filed suit against the board in 2010 over mold problems in the luxury waterfront tower.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
Once touted as an affordable cure for overflowing classrooms in Westminster, Cranberry Station Elementary has proved to be a taxpayer burden instead. Officials are cutting corners as the school is being built -- with thinner roofing material and fewer play areas -- to pay for a project that is already $1.7 million over budget.Why does the school have such a hefty price tag?Two words: "I apologize."Documents obtained by The Sun show that the bulk of the school's 20 percent cost overrun stems from Carroll County school officials' relentless pursuit of an apology from the man they hired to build the school, James W. Ancel.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The Baltimore County school system will have to spend as much as $7 million more than expected for an addition at one of its high schools, after allowing a construction firm to pull out of the project over a dispute with the architect, leaving only a concrete foundation and 2-foot-high walls behind. Contractor James W. Ancel asked to leave the $20 million project at Milford Mill Academy last year, claiming the architectural drawings supplied by the county were flawed. The school system decided to pay him $7.6 million for the work he performed and for equipment and materials he brought to the site, and then to seek another contractor, calling it the most expedient and sensible resolution.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
Once touted as an affordable cure for overflowing classrooms in Westminster, Cranberry Station Elementary has proved to be a taxpayer burden instead. Officials are cutting corners as the school is being built -- with thinner roofing material and fewer play areas -- to pay for a project that is already $1.7 million over budget.Why does the school have such a hefty price tag?Two words: "I apologize."Documents obtained by The Sun show that the bulk of the school's 20 percent cost overrun stems from Carroll County school officials' relentless pursuit of an apology from the man they hired to build the school, James W. Ancel.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
Top Carroll County school officials doctored videotapes of school board meetings and withheld other information regarding the troubled construction of Cranberry Station Elementary School, according to a lawsuit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court.The suit, filed by Cranberry Station's original contractor, James W. Ancel Inc. of Towson, accuses school officials of violating Maryland's Public Information Act, which protects the public's access to government documents and materials.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
Top Carroll County school officials doctored videotapes of school board meetings and withheld other information regarding the troubled construction of Cranberry Station Elementary School, according to a lawsuit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court.The suit, filed by Cranberry Station's original contractor, James W. Ancel Inc. of Towson, accuses school officials of violating Maryland's Public Information Act, which protects the public's access to government documents and materials.
NEWS
By John Murphy and Melody Simmons and John Murphy and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Carroll school officials defended yesterday their costly breakup with the original contractor of Cranberry Station Elementary, arguing that tight deadlines and numerous disputes contributed to their decision to take over the project.While acknowledging that the Board of Education was responsible for some delays on the Westminster school, officials said frequent disputes with Towson contractor James W. Ancel led them to believe the school might not be completed on time."Early on, it started to become obvious to us that the adversarial relationship maybe was a little unusual.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
A Baltimore County judge has decided there is enough reason to let a defamation suit against top Carroll County school officials move forward.The lawsuit, filed in April by James W. Ancel -- a Towson contractor who was hired to build Cranberry Station Elementary School in Westminster -- alleges Superintendent William H. Hyde, Assistant Superintendent Vernon F. Smith Jr. and school board attorney Louis J. Kozlakowski harmed his reputation by saying that...
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that the Harborview condo association must pay the owner of one of the tower's penthouses more than $15,500 each month for failing to complete maintenance within a court-ordered deadline. Judge Emanuel Brown found the condo association in contempt of a 2011 award, upheld on appeal in 2013, that required the board to complete maintenance due to water infiltration in owner James W. Ancel, Sr.'s 27 t h floor unit. Ancel, the head of a Towson-based construction firm, filed suit against the board in 2010 over mold problems in the luxury waterfront tower.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
A city panel dismissed citations for mold at a luxury Inner Harbor high-rise this summer after inquiries from a city councilwoman who lives there. A penthouse resident at the Harborview says Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector contacted city officials out of concern that enforcement action would hurt property values at the 27-story building. Paul C. Clark says leaks and mold have forced his family out of the penthouse they bought last year for $1.15 million. Spector, who lives at the Harborview with her boyfriend despite representing a district in Northwest Baltimore, says she called city officials about the case, but did not ask them to drop the citations proposed by the Health Department.
NEWS
February 13, 2007
Gerard Albert Ancel Sr., a retired high school French teacher, died of pancreatic cancer Feb. 6 in Clearwater, Fla. The former Hampden resident was 72. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, he graduated from St. Joseph, a French Jesuit University there, and later taught French in the American Embassy there. He moved to Baltimore in 1961 and received two master's degrees in education, from Loyola College and the Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Ancel was a State Department interpreter for visiting dignitaries before beginning a teaching career at Boys' Latin School.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2005
He's got baseballs autographed by every American president since 1901, including the only known ball signed by Theodore Roosevelt and a few that were hurled as Opening Day first pitches. He's got Babe Ruth's 1920 bat, with indentations Ruth made each time he hit a home run. Remember George Brett's 1983 "pine tar" home run? He's got the can of pine tar. And while other collectors can boast that they have a copy of the first issue of Playboy featuring curvaceous Marilyn Monroe on its black-and-white cover, James Ancel has probably the only one signed by her husband, Joe DiMaggio.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
At one end of his long, rectangular Towson office, James W. Ancel hovers over a pile of books and documents from one of the dozen construction bids his firm wins each year to build multimillion-dollar garages, schools and wastewater treatment projects. Yet the 39-year-old Baltimore native's mind is on the phone at the room's other end, which he'll use to begin bidding on one of two baseball jerseys worn by Baltimore Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. in his rookie year. During the past five years, spurred in part by Ripken's quest for ironman status, Ancel has gained an East Coast reputation as a serious baseball memorabilia hunter with a coveted collection.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Ending one of its nagging legal battles, the Carroll County Board of Education has reached a settlement with Towson contractor James W. Ancel, agreeing to pay him $60,000 to drop his defamation lawsuit against top school administrators.Ancel, who was hired to build Cranberry Station Elementary School, filed the $45 million suit in April, claiming school officials falsely accused him of being unable to complete the project on time and within budget. School lawyers argued that the statements were matters of opinion and not defamatory.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
A Baltimore County judge has decided there is enough reason to let a defamation suit against top Carroll County school officials move forward.The lawsuit, filed in April by James W. Ancel -- a Towson contractor who was hired to build Cranberry Station Elementary School in Westminster -- alleges Superintendent William H. Hyde, Assistant Superintendent Vernon F. Smith Jr. and school board attorney Louis J. Kozlakowski harmed his reputation by saying that...
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Ending one of its nagging legal battles, the Carroll County Board of Education has reached a settlement with Towson contractor James W. Ancel, agreeing to pay him $60,000 to drop his defamation lawsuit against top school administrators.Ancel, who was hired to build Cranberry Station Elementary School, filed the $45 million suit in April, claiming school officials falsely accused him of being unable to complete the project on time and within budget. School lawyers argued that the statements were matters of opinion and not defamatory.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
A city panel dismissed citations for mold at a luxury Inner Harbor high-rise this summer after inquiries from a city councilwoman who lives there. A penthouse resident at the Harborview says Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector contacted city officials out of concern that enforcement action would hurt property values at the 27-story building. Paul C. Clark says leaks and mold have forced his family out of the penthouse they bought last year for $1.15 million. Spector, who lives at the Harborview with her boyfriend despite representing a district in Northwest Baltimore, says she called city officials about the case, but did not ask them to drop the citations proposed by the Health Department.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Cranberry Station Elementary School's original contractor filed a defamation suit yesterday against top Carroll County school officials, claiming they falsely accused him of being unable to finish the project on time or within budget.James W. Ancel Inc. of Towson took issue with statements made at a public meeting last month by Superintendent William H. Hyde, Assistant Superintendent Vernon F. Smith Jr. and school board attorney Louis J. Kozlakowski, who argued that Ancel's contract was terminated because of scheduling concerns and disputes over rock removal and steel work.
NEWS
By John Murphy and Melody Simmons and John Murphy and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Carroll school officials defended yesterday their costly breakup with the original contractor of Cranberry Station Elementary, arguing that tight deadlines and numerous disputes contributed to their decision to take over the project.While acknowledging that the Board of Education was responsible for some delays on the Westminster school, officials said frequent disputes with Towson contractor James W. Ancel led them to believe the school might not be completed on time."Early on, it started to become obvious to us that the adversarial relationship maybe was a little unusual.
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