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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | March 13, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela embarked on a peace mission to the strife-torn eastern province of Natal yesterday, but his trip was marred by an attack on supporters in one of the townships he was to visit.One man was killed and another injured when gunmen opened fire on a car owned by Rasta Obed Maphanga, a local African National Congress leader in Ezakheni township, who was not in the car.After the incident, the ANC canceled Mr. Mandela's visit to Ezakheni township."There have been problems in Ezakheni, and this shooting was just a way to ensure that Mr. Mandela would not go there," said Cassandra Gabriel, an ANC spokeswoman in Natal.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 10, 1995
IZINGOLWENI, South Africa -- When the political leaders of South Africa squabble, the people of KwaZulu-Natal are usually the ones who die.They have been dying in this rural settlement for weeks now -- seven in one particularly grisly incident, five in another. The killings follow ancient fault lines between Zulu clans -- and those separating President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress and Mangosuthu Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party, the party of the Zulus.And this time the killings are about the future of the Zulus' tribal chiefs.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela warned yesterday that violence would spread to white sections of South Africa if the government does not act decisively to stop the carnage in black townships.Mr. Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress, urged his supporters not to attack white areas because "there are many innocent people there who have nothing to do with the violence."But he told mourners in Kagiso township at a memorial service for victims of a massacre last weekend, "The government must know that as long as it allows this violence to continue . . . there is a danger that this violence might spread to the white areas."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
SOWETO, South Africa -- State President Frederick W. de Klerk's two impromptu walkabouts during his campaign stop in this sprawling black township were moments out of the picture-book of the new South Africa.Scores of excited residents crowded about, smiling as they strained for a glimpse of the white leader of the party that imposed apartheid and then dismantled it.Whether or not they would vote for his National Party next month was beside the point: Their president had come to call, and they were glad.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
SOWETO, South Africa -- State President Frederick W. de Klerk's two impromptu walkabouts during his campaign stop in this sprawling black township were moments out of the picture-book of the new South Africa.Scores of excited residents crowded about, smiling as they strained for a glimpse of the white leader of the party that imposed apartheid and then dismantled it.Whether or not they would vote for his National Party next month was beside the point: Their president had come to call, and they were glad.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 8, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The African National Congress put off plans yesterday to march on the black homeland of Bophuthatswana amid threats of violence and a warning that the South African government would stop the demonstration.The march, planned for tomorrow, would have been the first major demonstration since 28 ANC protesters were gunned down by government troops in the black homeland of Ciskei on Sept. 7.ANC spokesman Carl Niehaus said the organization was "walking a very difficult tightrope" between supporters who wanted to demonstrate and black homeland authorities who promise a repeat of the Ciskei bloodshed.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | July 20, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's top law enforcement officer confirmed yesterday that the government gave thousands of dollars to political opponents of the African National Congress, the main anti-apartheid group in the country.Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok said the government financed two political rallies held by the Zulu-based Inkatha movement, the ANC's main black rival, but he said the support was non-partisan.The statement was the first official disclosure by the government that it has helped Inkatha.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 10, 1995
IZINGOLWENI, South Africa -- When the political leaders of South Africa squabble, the people of KwaZulu-Natal are usually the ones who die.They have been dying in this rural settlement for weeks now -- seven in one particularly grisly incident, five in another. The killings follow ancient fault lines between Zulu clans -- and those separating President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress and Mangosuthu Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party, the party of the Zulus.And this time the killings are about the future of the Zulus' tribal chiefs.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 18, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In the midst of a critical debate on the shape of South Africa's future government, Nelson Mandela has been sidelined, suffering from exhaustion.The African National Congress (ANC) said yesterday that Mr. Mandela, its president and driving personality, has canceled most of his appointments on doctor's orders to get a much-needed rest.The 74-year-old black leader has been forced to take time off as his organization debates a controversial proposal for a coalition government that would include the ANC and the ruling National Party.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | August 3, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa is braced for two days of paralysis this week as millions of black workers stage a nationwide strike aimed at forcing the white government to give way to black rule.Thousands of police officers have been dispatched to the nation's most volatile black townships, and government officials have warned of possible violence between supporters and opponents of the strike.On the eve of the mass work stoppage, observers from the United Nations arrived in the country, saying they hoped their presence would contribute to a peaceful climate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 20, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Gunmen in the polarized Zulu province of Natal surrounded sleeping supporters of the African National Congress early yesterday and killed 15 in what ANC leaders feared was the first big blow of a violent anti-election campaign.Zibuse Mlaba, a Zulu chief who is also an ANC leader in the area, said the victims, most of them teen-agers, had put up posters in the nearby town of Creighton on Friday and were preparing for a voter education program yesterday.Police said the group had been shot and stabbed just after midnight as they slept in an abandoned house in the village of Mahlele, in southern Natal.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | March 13, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela embarked on a peace mission to the strife-torn eastern province of Natal yesterday, but his trip was marred by an attack on supporters in one of the townships he was to visit.One man was killed and another injured when gunmen opened fire on a car owned by Rasta Obed Maphanga, a local African National Congress leader in Ezakheni township, who was not in the car.After the incident, the ANC canceled Mr. Mandela's visit to Ezakheni township."There have been problems in Ezakheni, and this shooting was just a way to ensure that Mr. Mandela would not go there," said Cassandra Gabriel, an ANC spokeswoman in Natal.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 18, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In the midst of a critical debate on the shape of South Africa's future government, Nelson Mandela has been sidelined, suffering from exhaustion.The African National Congress (ANC) said yesterday that Mr. Mandela, its president and driving personality, has canceled most of his appointments on doctor's orders to get a much-needed rest.The 74-year-old black leader has been forced to take time off as his organization debates a controversial proposal for a coalition government that would include the ANC and the ruling National Party.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 8, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The African National Congress put off plans yesterday to march on the black homeland of Bophuthatswana amid threats of violence and a warning that the South African government would stop the demonstration.The march, planned for tomorrow, would have been the first major demonstration since 28 ANC protesters were gunned down by government troops in the black homeland of Ciskei on Sept. 7.ANC spokesman Carl Niehaus said the organization was "walking a very difficult tightrope" between supporters who wanted to demonstrate and black homeland authorities who promise a repeat of the Ciskei bloodshed.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- The South African reform process was dealt a blow yesterday by Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, who said he would not talk with the government as long as it was making private deals with the dominant black African National Congress.Mr. Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said he would not abide by any agreements struck between the government of President F. W. de Klerk and the ANC led by Nelson Mandela."Either we will have bilateral negotiations between the government and the ANC, which will lead to the victory of revolutionaries . . . or we will have multilateral negotiations leading to a fair, race-free democracy in which the ANC is one party among many," he said.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | August 3, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa is braced for two days of paralysis this week as millions of black workers stage a nationwide strike aimed at forcing the white government to give way to black rule.Thousands of police officers have been dispatched to the nation's most volatile black townships, and government officials have warned of possible violence between supporters and opponents of the strike.On the eve of the mass work stoppage, observers from the United Nations arrived in the country, saying they hoped their presence would contribute to a peaceful climate.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- The South African reform process was dealt a blow yesterday by Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, who said he would not talk with the government as long as it was making private deals with the dominant black African National Congress.Mr. Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said he would not abide by any agreements struck between the government of President F. W. de Klerk and the ANC led by Nelson Mandela."Either we will have bilateral negotiations between the government and the ANC, which will lead to the victory of revolutionaries . . . or we will have multilateral negotiations leading to a fair, race-free democracy in which the ANC is one party among many," he said.
NEWS
By PETER HONEY and PETER HONEY,Mr. Honey was The Sun's Johannesburg correspondent from 1986 to 1990. He was born and raised in South Africa | February 9, 1992
I have just returned from a month in South Africa; visiting family, looking up old friends, making new ones and watching my old homeland trying to wriggle out of apartheid.It has left me as perplexed as everybody else down there. As a friend remarked, only half jokingly: "What do I think? Well it depends on which day of the week it is." But I did come away with a tale or two that, hopefully, will leave the casual reader as well-confused as anyone else.The first concerns a banquet held for Nelson Mandela and other leaders of the African National Congress to celebrate the organization's 80th birthday on January 8.It's not that the dinner itself was interesting, just that the host was the Bloemfontein City Council.
NEWS
By PETER HONEY and PETER HONEY,Mr. Honey was The Sun's Johannesburg correspondent from 1986 to 1990. He was born and raised in South Africa | February 9, 1992
I have just returned from a month in South Africa; visiting family, looking up old friends, making new ones and watching my old homeland trying to wriggle out of apartheid.It has left me as perplexed as everybody else down there. As a friend remarked, only half jokingly: "What do I think? Well it depends on which day of the week it is." But I did come away with a tale or two that, hopefully, will leave the casual reader as well-confused as anyone else.The first concerns a banquet held for Nelson Mandela and other leaders of the African National Congress to celebrate the organization's 80th birthday on January 8.It's not that the dinner itself was interesting, just that the host was the Bloemfontein City Council.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | July 20, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's top law enforcement officer confirmed yesterday that the government gave thousands of dollars to political opponents of the African National Congress, the main anti-apartheid group in the country.Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok said the government financed two political rallies held by the Zulu-based Inkatha movement, the ANC's main black rival, but he said the support was non-partisan.The statement was the first official disclosure by the government that it has helped Inkatha.
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