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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 8, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela emerged from political isolation yesterday to launch a scathing attack on leaders of the African National Congress, which is headed by her estranged husband Nelson.Speaking at the grave site of Helen Joseph, a celebrated anti-apartheid campaigner who died last month at the age of 87, Mrs. Mandela criticized ANC leaders for cutting a deal to share power between "the elite of the oppressed and the oppressors."It was the first major speech by Mrs. Mandela since she was forced to resign her ANC positions last April after her highly publicized breakup with Mr. Mandela and her conviction on assault and kidnapping charges.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Acknowledging that it may have gone far outside the law in granting a blanket amnesty to top officials of South Africa's ruling government, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said yesterday that it would submit its decision to a court for review.vTC The amnesty, granted last month to 37 leaders of the African National Congress, including Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, immediately drew fire from South Africa's other political parties.They pointed out that the amnesty was unlike any other issued by the commission.
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NEWS
October 24, 1990
Zephania Mothopeng, 77, who broke away from the African National Congress to help form and lead the militant Pan Africanist Congress, died yesterday in South Africa. He had been suffering from cancer and pneumonia. Mr. Mothopeng lived his last years a few blocks from fellow black nationalists Nelson Mandela and Walter Sisulu, but his militant stance kept him far from the more moderate ANC leaders. His release from Johannesburg's Diepkloof Prison in November 1988 preceded reforms that included freedom for the ANC leaders and government promises to include blacks in a new constitution.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 21, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The post-Mandela era opened here yesterday with a shift in political priorities from reconciliation of this racially divided society to its economic transformation to benefit the poor.Thabo Mbeki, successor to President Nelson Mandela as leader of the ruling African National Congress and heir apparent to the state presidency in 1999, used his keynote speech to the party's national conference to set the agenda for taking the country into the next millennium."We are the ANC," he said, "because we are committed to the reduction of poverty and can never say our work is done while, with our own eyes, we see the suffering of the rural masses and the blight of the squatter camps that surround our towns and our cities."
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela and President Frederik W. de Klerk meet today in an atmosphere of mounting political tension.The meeting takes place as top government officials question the African National Congress' commitment to peace and as ANC leaders question Mr. de Klerk's integrity and willingness to continue negotiations toward a new constitution.It also takes place amid a stepped-up ANC campaign of mass demonstrations and strikes aimed at putting new pressure on the government, which embarked on a process of reform in February but which recently has been engaged in a war of words with the ANC. Mr. de Klerk said the "mass action" campaign goes against the spirit of negotiations and could delay the 6-month-old talks.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | July 23, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The African National Congress called for the resignation of two top Cabinet ministers yesterday as the government of President F. W. de Klerk sought to contain the fallout from a major scandal involving political payoffs.The ANC, Nelson Mandela's anti-apartheid organization, said the scandal posed a threat to South Africa's peace process, which zTC only recently began to get back on track after months of delay and confrontation between the ANC and government leaders.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 17, 1990
SOWETO, South Africa -- The African National Congress threatened yesterday to walk out of negotiations with the South African government unless the government releases all political prisoners and allows all exiles to return to the country by April 30.The ANC said the government must also repeal "all repressive legislation" and end all political trials by that date.Ending its historic conference, the first inside South Africa since the organization was banned 30 years ago, the ANC also threatened to resume its military campaign against the government unless South African authorities stop the violence that has rocked black townships.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1991
DURBAN, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela's African National Congress said yesterday that international pressure was still needed, along with internal demonstrations and negotiations, to achieve a fair political settlement in South Africa.The ANC, the country's most powerful anti-apartheid organization, issued the appeal for continued international support as its historic five-day convention drew to a close in this Indian Ocean city."To achieve the strategic objective of our struggle, it is vital that we continue to combine all forms of the struggle, drawing in the widest spectrum of the people," the convention delegates said in a formal resolution.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 19, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- The African National Congress formally endorsed the idea of an interim government yesterday in which it would rule jointly with whites and other black parties during a period of transition to democracy.After a stormy three-day meeting of its 90-member executive council, ANC leaders came out in support of power-sharing with whites for up to five years, although they shunned the phrase "power-sharing," which offends many of their more militant backers.The endorsement is the clearest evidence yet that the two major parties in South Africa, the mainly black ANC and the National Party-led white-minority government, are close to agreement on the route the country should take from apartheid to full-fledged democracy dominated by the black majority.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | September 11, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The white government and the African National Congress (ANC) scrambled yesterday to find a way out of the worst political crisis in South Africa since the country's reform process began 31 months ago.Foreign Minister Roelof F. "Pik" Botha asked the United Nations to send another special envoy to help stop the violence, and the ANC agreed in principle to a meeting between Nelson Mandela, its leader, and President F. W. de...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 1, 1997
STELLENBOSCH, South Africa -- A student in this charming campus town in the heartland of lost white supremacy has just told former President F. W. de Klerk he is yesteryear's man."You had your chance, and you blew it," the student told the veteran politician, leader of the waning National Party and the country's last white president.Facing his audience last week, de Klerk didn't miss a beat. "Yes. And we did something. We abolished apartheid and admitted the wrongs of the past."With that he launched into a spirited defense of his party's record and a ferocious critique of the ruling African National Congress, led by President Nelson Mandela, the man with whom he shared the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 11, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- South African leader Nelson Mandela got the NAACP's annual convention off to a rousing start yesterday by calling on black Americans to help create a "democratic, nonracial and nonsexist" South Africa.Mr. Mandela, who is expected to become South Africa's first black president next year, said he would ask the United States to end economic sanctions against his country in the "near future.""Today we talk about elections because the sanctions have worked," said Mr. Mandela, who spent 27 years as a political prisoner in South Africa.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 19, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- The African National Congress formally endorsed the idea of an interim government yesterday in which it would rule jointly with whites and other black parties during a period of transition to democracy.After a stormy three-day meeting of its 90-member executive council, ANC leaders came out in support of power-sharing with whites for up to five years, although they shunned the phrase "power-sharing," which offends many of their more militant backers.The endorsement is the clearest evidence yet that the two major parties in South Africa, the mainly black ANC and the National Party-led white-minority government, are close to agreement on the route the country should take from apartheid to full-fledged democracy dominated by the black majority.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 25, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela glided into the board room of her sparse new office, a statuesque figure all in black except for the gold and green fringes at the edge of her scarf.The three colors are those of the African National Congress, the organization to which she pledged allegiance for more than 30 years but for which she has become a political headache in recent times.The woman once dubbed the mother of the nation is on her own now, estranged from both the ANC and her famous husband, ANC President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | January 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's congressional delegation put the finishing touches on their plans for the inauguration yesterday as their lucky guests got ready for the capital's biggest party in years.The one event that's on nearly every list, of course, is the swearing-in at noon, with members from both sides of the political aisle expected to attend. Tonight, the black-tie Mid-Atlantic States Inaugural Ball is expected to draw thousands to Union Station from Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 8, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela emerged from political isolation yesterday to launch a scathing attack on leaders of the African National Congress, which is headed by her estranged husband Nelson.Speaking at the grave site of Helen Joseph, a celebrated anti-apartheid campaigner who died last month at the age of 87, Mrs. Mandela criticized ANC leaders for cutting a deal to share power between "the elite of the oppressed and the oppressors."It was the first major speech by Mrs. Mandela since she was forced to resign her ANC positions last April after her highly publicized breakup with Mr. Mandela and her conviction on assault and kidnapping charges.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 11, 1990
SOWETO, South Africa -- Black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela said yesterday that the African National Congress will hold talks soon with its main black political adversary and the white government to stop the violence that threatens to turn South Africa into "another Lebanon."Mr. Mandela said he would meet with President Frederik W. de Klerk on Nov. 27 and with Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi as soon as possible to ensure that the peace process continues."We are concerned about the increasing tensions in the country, the violence that has erupted again," Mr. Mandela told a news conference yesterday, one day after he returned from a major trip to Europe, Asia and Australia.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 25, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela glided into the board room of her sparse new office, a statuesque figure all in black except for the gold and green fringes at the edge of her scarf.The three colors are those of the African National Congress, the organization to which she pledged allegiance for more than 30 years but for which she has become a political headache in recent times.The woman once dubbed the mother of the nation is on her own now, estranged from both the ANC and her famous husband, ANC President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | September 11, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The white government and the African National Congress (ANC) scrambled yesterday to find a way out of the worst political crisis in South Africa since the country's reform process began 31 months ago.Foreign Minister Roelof F. "Pik" Botha asked the United Nations to send another special envoy to help stop the violence, and the ANC agreed in principle to a meeting between Nelson Mandela, its leader, and President F. W. de...
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