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July 9, 1991
At its first conference inside South Africa in three decades, the African National Conference went a long way toward remaking itself from an outlawed revolutionary movement demanding power into a broad political movement democratically seeking it. Not all the way, but a long way.Its newly elected president, Nelson Mandela, tried to broker between the party's internal life and outside realities. "Our position is very clear," he said. "Sanctions must continue to be maintained and applied." But acknowledging that they are disappearing, he told the 2,224 delegates that "unless there is a great deal of flexibility and imagination, we will be left holding a shell and nothing else."
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NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Jacob Zuma, who swept to victory last week as leader of South Africa's ruling African National Congress party, was charged with corruption yesterday in a setback that could thwart his ambitions to rule the country. The populist Zuma trounced South African President Thabo Mbeki in the ANC leadership contest, although the corruption case against him has been dragging on for years. Officials of the National Prosecuting Authority announced last week that they had sufficient evidence to charge Zuma.
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NEWS
By Seamus Martin | April 16, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- To achieve nearly 70 percent of the vote in a turnout of more than three-fourths of the electorate is an extraordinary mandate for any political party, but that's precisely what the African National Congress (ANC) is about to do. Final returns will not be available until later today, but results so far indicate one of the most comprehensive victories ever attained in a democratic election. The lack of an effective opposition has raised concerns about the health of the democracy.
NEWS
By Seamus Martin | April 16, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- To achieve nearly 70 percent of the vote in a turnout of more than three-fourths of the electorate is an extraordinary mandate for any political party, but that's precisely what the African National Congress (ANC) is about to do. Final returns will not be available until later today, but results so far indicate one of the most comprehensive victories ever attained in a democratic election. The lack of an effective opposition has raised concerns about the health of the democracy.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | August 10, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The guerrilla army of the African National Congress, which operated in secret from bases outside the country for nearly three decades, opened its first-ever national conference inside the borders of South Africa yesterday.ANC President Nelson Mandela, commander in chief of the army and one of its founders in 1961, said the three-day meeting was historic because "we are gathered not in the cellars, safe houses and hide-outs of the underground, but in full view of all."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1992
BISHO, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela deplored the killing yesterday of more than two dozen supporters of the African National Congress (ANC) in a protest march against the South African black homeland of Ciskei, but the congress itself was accused of bearing some responsibility.Most of the blame for the killings was directed at Ciskei's military ruler, Brig. Joshua Oupa Gqozo.But criticism of the ANC was also voiced by white sources normally sympathetic to the ANC.ANC officials confirmed yesterday that a sudden charge by about 100 of its supporters into forbidden Ciskei territory had been approved by the highest leaders of the anti-apartheid movement, gambling that the army would refuse to fire.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 13, 1992
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- South Africa's prospects for democracy took a turn for the worse yesterday as President F. W. de Klerk issued a set of new demands on the African National Congress.Mr. de Klerk, speaking to a special session of Parliament, crushed any hopes for speedy movement toward an interim government to replace his white-minority regime.The president detailed a list of constitutional principles that he said the ANC must accept before he would release the reins of power. They included a condition that the presidency be shared by more than one party and that protections be included for "regional interests" and other "specific interests."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 3, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President F. W. de Klerk marked the fourth anniversary of the launch of the new South Africa with a blistering attack against the African National Congress -- the very group he had allowed to come out of hiding.Legalizing the ANC and freeing its leader, Nelson Mandela, after 27 years in prison were the hallmarks of Mr. de Klerk's speech on Feb. 2, 1990. Now the ANC is the clear favorite to win the country's first multiracial election in April, thus handing Mr. de Klerk's presidency to Mr. Mandela.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 24, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The march toward democracy in South Africa came to a dead halt yesterday as the African National Congress and its allies formally pulled out of negotiations with the government.Leaders of the ANC said they had no option but to break off all negotiations because "the National Party regime of President F. W. de Klerk has brought our country to the brink of disaster."The decision affirms a move Sunday by ANC President Nelson Mandela to break off meetings between the white-minority government and the dominant black political organization.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
NELSON MANDELA will remain South Africa's president until his term ends in 1999. But the daily running of the government has already largely shifted into the hands of Thabo Mbeki, his 55-year-old deputy who last week was elected president of the ruling African National Congress.Africa's post-colonial history is full of freedom fighter presidents who could not relinquish power. Mr. Mandela, 79, decided he would not go down in history as having stayed on too long. He insisted that his initial timetable for the transfer of power be adhered to. He is ready to assume the role of elder statesman, letting a younger generation take charge.
NEWS
By Samson Mulugeta and Samson Mulugeta,NEWSDAY | April 16, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Election results showed the African National Congress headed yesterday for a sweeping victory that would give it a two-thirds majority in Parliament and the power to unilaterally change the constitution. Nearly complete returns from Wednesday's voting showed the ANC winning seven of the country's nine provinces and leading in the remaining two, and enjoying even greater support than it did in the historic 1994 vote that ended white-minority rule and brought Nelson Mandela to power.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - A surprise split late last week in this country's official opposition could significantly alter regional politics by thrusting the ruling African National Congress into power in a longtime opposition stronghold and giving it nationwide dominance, analysts said this week. The New National Party, the successor to the party responsible for apartheid, said Friday that it was suspending its membership in the Democratic Alliance, the country's main political opposition.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 24, 2001
KWAMHLANGA, South Africa - By all accounts, Tony Leon should be a political nonentity in this remote black village. For starters, he's white. Dressed in a blue and gold pin-striped shirt, patent leather shoes and sunglasses, Leon looks as if he would be more comfortable socializing in Johannesburg's plush suburbs than walking the poor, dusty streets of this Mpumalanga Province village. And he's here to attempt something thought impossible: to woo black voters from South Africa's ruling African National Congress - the party of black liberation and Nelson Mandela - to join his white-dominated party, the Democratic Alliance.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 8, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The ruling African National Congress failed by a single seat to win the two-thirds parliamentary majority it sought in last week's election, according to final vote results released last night.Voters effectively handed the party, led by president-in-waiting Thabo Mbeki, an overwhelming victory, with 66.5 percent of the vote, while barely withholding the ultimate veto-proof, constitution-amending legislative power.This relaxed opposition parties, which feared ANC might tinker with the constitution, and international markets, which worried about a possible threat to the independence of the South African reserve bank.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The African National Congress, under its new leader, Thabo Mbeki, won a bigger victory in elections this week than five years ago and was headed for a commanding two-thirds majority in Parliament."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 3, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- This country's second democratic election went off smoothly yesterday, with President Nelson Mandela's hand-picked successor, Thabo Mbeki, assured of victory when the results are announced as early as today.With less emotion than in the first ballot for black majority rule five years ago, millions of South Africans put an X beside the party of their choice, and Mandela's ruling African National Congress headed for another overwhelming majority."What we have seen from President Mandela is that no one can reform a country in five years," said Smile Mastromhals, an estate agent, after he cast his vote in the cosmopolitan Johannesburg suburb of Bramley.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 14, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A tentative power-sharing agreement between the South African government and the African National Congress sparked threats of defiance and bloodshed from smaller political parties yesterday.The mostly Zulu Inkatha Freedom Party, the all-white Conservative Party and leftist black organizations all attacked the agreement, which is expected to be endorsed this week by President F. W. de Klerk's Cabinet and the ANC's executive committee.If ratified by the two major parties, the pact would put South Africa on a clear and fast track toward a new constitution and post-apartheid government.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 9, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela started the new political year with a conciliatory gesture yesterday by virtually accepting the government's timetable for elections next year.Speaking at a news conference, Mr. Mandela said his African National Congress wanted an end to white rule in South Africa this year. But he said the anti-apartheid group was "not dogmatic" about the timing of South Africa's first democratic elections."Although we feel elections are urgent, there may be some developments which would make it impossible to hold elections this year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Police said yesterday that they had uncovered a vast cache of arms and ammunition in a bunker in KwaZulu-Natal province, aggravating tensions as South Africa's second post-apartheid elections approach on June 2.The stockpile, believed to be the biggest uncovered in South Africa, were found in Nquthu, about 20 miles west of Ulundi, the former headquarters of Mangosuthu Buthelezi, head of the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party.The...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Thabo Mbeki is the man who will try to fill Nelson Mandela's shoes this year, when he seems certain to be elected the second black president of the new South Africa.President of the ruling African National Congress and deputy president to Mandela, Mbeki is a very apparent heir.But who is this man who is about to emerge from behind one of the largest shadows cast on the modern world stage?The answer, to considerable degree, can be gleaned from a new book, which clusters 42 of his speeches spanning the past 34 years.
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