Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnbar
IN THE NEWS

Anbar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 2007
RAMADI, Iraq -- Anbar province, long the lawless heartland of the tenacious Sunni Arab resistance, is undergoing a surprising transformation. Violence is ebbing in many areas, shops and schools are reopening, police forces are growing, and the insurgency appears to be in retreat. "Many people are challenging the insurgents," said the governor of Anbar, Maamoon S. Rahid, though he quickly added, "We know we haven't eliminated the threat 100 percent." Many Sunni tribal leaders, once openly hostile to the American presence, have formed a united front with American and Iraqi government forces against al-Qaida in Iraq.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John A. McCary | March 18, 2010
The Iraqi parliamentary elections last week highlight one very important lesson about tribal engagement in counterinsurgencies: It works. Voter turnout in Sunni tribal provinces such as Anbar and Diyala -- formerly hotbeds of the insurgency -- topped out at 70 percent. Among the long list of newly formed political parties vying for seats in parliament, more than a few boasted openly tribal affiliations. Tribal outreach was also a major component of coalition forming for major Shiite candidates, including Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and Ayad Allawi, proving that tribal engagement can work across sectarian lines.
Advertisement
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2006
RAWAH, Iraq -- Few Americans are greeted as warmly by Iraqi soldiers serving in the western desert of Anbar province as Maj. John Bilas, a Marine from Camp Pendleton. He pays them. Tall and sturdily built, Bilas recently climbed aboard a Black Hawk helicopter in Baghdad and headed for Al Asad, a military base in Anbar, the heartland of Iraq's Sunni Arab-led insurgency. He carried more than $2 million in cash. Over the next several days, riding in Humvee convoys, he would make the dangerous journey across Anbar to outposts and bases to deliver the payroll for the soldiers of Iraq's 7th Army Division.
NEWS
By Doug Smith and Saif Rasheed and Doug Smith and Saif Rasheed,Los Angeles Times | August 17, 2008
RAMADI, Iraq - As Iraqi officials and the U.S. military haggle over when to let Anbar province take control of its own security, a row of broken-down Ford pickups in a Ramadi schoolyard offers a sobering picture of the readiness of the region's security forces. The U.S. military gave the vehicles to the police stationed in a former school here, but the Iraqi government hasn't provided parts or a maintenance system to keep them running. The cops work on their own vehicles, picking parts from the junkers.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2005
RAMADI, Iraq - Fear of insurgent attacks and a call by Sunni Muslim clerics to boycott the elections prevailed in the turbulent Anbar province yesterday as most voters stayed at home despite U.S. promises to protect those who showed up to cast ballots. Unofficial figures from the province showed that about 17,000 of as many as 250,000 eligible voters in Anbar participated in the first national election since a U.S.-led coalition deposed Saddam Hussein. The mostly Sunni province is home to the restive cities of Ramadi and Fallujah.
NEWS
By Michael R. Gordon and Michael R. Gordon,New York Times News Service | September 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The political and security situation in western Iraq is grim and will continue to deteriorate unless the region receives a major infusion of aid and a division is sent to reinforce the U.S. troops operating there, according to the senior Marine intelligence officer in Iraq. The assessment, prepared last month by Col. Peter Devlin at the Marine headquarters in Anbar province, has been sent to senior military officials in Iraq and at the Pentagon. While the U.S. military is focused on trying to secure Baghdad and prevent the sectarian strife there from escalating into a civil war, the assessment points to the difficulties in Anbar, a vast Sunni-dominated area of western Iraq where the insurgency is particularly strong.
NEWS
By Sam Enriquez and Julian E. Barnes and Sam Enriquez and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Thousands of people paid respects yesterday to the sheik credited with forging ties between Sunni tribesmen and the U.S. military, and American leaders weighed the prospects of the brother who is expected to succeed him. The U.S. military also reported that four U.S. soldiers were killed in Diyala province by an explosion near their vehicle. No names were released pending notification of their families, and no further details were available. The insurgent group al-Qaida in Iraq claimed responsibility yesterday in a Web site posting for the killing of Abdul-Sattar Abu Risha, who had persuaded Sunni tribes that once backed the insurgents to cooperate with the United States and accept arms to fight the insurgents.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | December 18, 2007
BAGHDAD -- On Thursday, Gen. David Petraeus addressed a gathering of hundreds of Sunni sheiks in flowing robes, including some who were attacking his soldiers around the capital not long ago. This is the new Baghdad, where security has improved as tens of thousands of former Sunni insurgents have recently turned against al-Qaida in Iraq and smashed it with U.S. help. Many of these Sunnis are now on the U.S. payroll. But no one is certain whether these security gains will hold after the extra U.S. "surge" troops are withdrawn as scheduled by next July, or whether Iraq will slip back into brutal sectarian warfare.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2007
Al Asad Air Base, Iraq -- President Bush made an unannounced visit to Iraq yesterday and held out the possibility that some U.S. troops might be withdrawn from the country if security gains made in one part of the country can be spread to others. However, the president offered no timetable on a withdrawal and did not indicate how many troops might be involved. And he insisted that decisions on force levels should not be driven by "a nervous reaction by Washington politicians or poll results."
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 14, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A Sunni tribal leader who was among the United States' high-profile allies in Iraq was killed in a bomb blast yesterday, an assassination that could undermine U.S. attempts to recruit former foes to stabilize the country. Sheik Abdul-Sattar Abu Risha was killed 10 days after meeting with President Bush during Bush's one-day visit to Anbar province, in western Iraq. The sheik had become a symbol of the military's effort to turn one-time enemies into partners to oppose insurgents and militias.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | December 18, 2007
BAGHDAD -- On Thursday, Gen. David Petraeus addressed a gathering of hundreds of Sunni sheiks in flowing robes, including some who were attacking his soldiers around the capital not long ago. This is the new Baghdad, where security has improved as tens of thousands of former Sunni insurgents have recently turned against al-Qaida in Iraq and smashed it with U.S. help. Many of these Sunnis are now on the U.S. payroll. But no one is certain whether these security gains will hold after the extra U.S. "surge" troops are withdrawn as scheduled by next July, or whether Iraq will slip back into brutal sectarian warfare.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman and Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A car bomb killed at least six people in the central Iraqi city of Ramadi yesterday, shattering the calm of an area that in recent months had been considered one of the safest in the country. Ramadi police officials said the bomb exploded near the city's courthouse in the late morning after a suicide bomber drove to the site. There were conflicting reports of the number of dead, but women, children and at least one police officer were said to be among the fatalities. The U.S. military had said four people died, including the bomber.
NEWS
By Sam Enriquez and Julian E. Barnes and Sam Enriquez and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Thousands of people paid respects yesterday to the sheik credited with forging ties between Sunni tribesmen and the U.S. military, and American leaders weighed the prospects of the brother who is expected to succeed him. The U.S. military also reported that four U.S. soldiers were killed in Diyala province by an explosion near their vehicle. No names were released pending notification of their families, and no further details were available. The insurgent group al-Qaida in Iraq claimed responsibility yesterday in a Web site posting for the killing of Abdul-Sattar Abu Risha, who had persuaded Sunni tribes that once backed the insurgents to cooperate with the United States and accept arms to fight the insurgents.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 14, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A Sunni tribal leader who was among the United States' high-profile allies in Iraq was killed in a bomb blast yesterday, an assassination that could undermine U.S. attempts to recruit former foes to stabilize the country. Sheik Abdul-Sattar Abu Risha was killed 10 days after meeting with President Bush during Bush's one-day visit to Anbar province, in western Iraq. The sheik had become a symbol of the military's effort to turn one-time enemies into partners to oppose insurgents and militias.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2007
Al Asad Air Base, Iraq -- President Bush made an unannounced visit to Iraq yesterday and held out the possibility that some U.S. troops might be withdrawn from the country if security gains made in one part of the country can be spread to others. However, the president offered no timetable on a withdrawal and did not indicate how many troops might be involved. And he insisted that decisions on force levels should not be driven by "a nervous reaction by Washington politicians or poll results."
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber detonated a vest packed with explosives in a Sunni Arab mosque in Fallujah yesterday, killing 10 worshipers, including the imam, and shattering what had been a period of relative calm for a region once the most volatile hotbed of Iraq's insurgency. The attack at the end of evening prayers was the deadliest to shake Anbar province since Sunni tribal leaders began working with U.S. forces in recent months to purge Islamist insurgents. The U.S. military and a Fallujah police official blamed al-Qaida in Iraq.
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. Marines launched a major offensive near Iraq's western border yesterday aimed at disrupting an important conduit for insurgents thought to be filtering into the country from Syria and slowing attacks before the referendum Oct. 15 on a new constitution. About 1,000 troops stormed into the village of Sadah early yesterday in armored Humvees and tanks. At least 10 people were killed by fire from helicopter gunships, said a doctor at the hospital in the nearby town of Qaim.
NEWS
By John A. McCary | March 18, 2010
T he Lesson Holds: What Tribal Engagement in Iraq Can Teach Us about Winning Allies in Afghanistan The Iraqi parliamentary elections last week highlight one very important lesson about tribal engagement in counterinsurgencies: It works. Voter turnout in Sunni tribal provinces such as Anbar and Diyala - formerly hotbeds of the insurgency - topped out at 70 percent. Among the long list of newly formed political parties vying for seats in parliament, more than a few boasted openly tribal affiliations.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Alexandra Zavis and Tina Susman and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The managing editor of a government-run newspaper launched with U.S. funding after the fall of Saddam Hussein was found dead yesterday, the 85th Iraqi journalist to be killed since the war began. The body of Filaih Wadi Mijthab of the daily Al Sabah was found in Baghdad on the day that a four-day-old curfew imposed after the bombing of a Shiite Muslim mosque in Samarra was lifted. Five unidentified bodies were found yesterday. Mijthab was kidnapped Wednesday by gunmen who intercepted his vehicle as he drove to work.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.