Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnatomy
IN THE NEWS

Anatomy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
WMAR-TV, Baltimore's ABC affiliate, aired a rerun Thursday night of the medical drama "Grey's Anatomy" that contained graphic violence eerily similar to the real-life events that took place earlier in the day at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The episode, which was last year's season finale of the hospital series, involved a man who becomes angry after his wife dies in surgery and goes on a shooting spree in the hospital while hunting for the doctor who treated her. The last image before the first commercial is a doctor shot in the head by the gunman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Nobody brings out the Republican long knives quite like Hillary Clinton does, and this week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart coined the perfect name for it: "Brainghazi. " It's the merging of the umpteenth investigation of Benghazi with the latest slander to be directed her way, the suggestion by Republican strategist Karl Rove that she's suffered brain damage. Mr. Rove tried to walk back that little smear on Tuesday after a New York Post headline to that effect set the Internet on fire.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 5, 1994
Spalding Gray has just arrived in Portland, Ore., after four days at a jungle island resort in the Strait of Malacca, where he spent much of his time fending off a large, wrathful monkey.Gray went to the resort to relax after working on a new John Boorman movie called "Beyond," about a 1988 pro-democracy uprising in Burma. But his contretemps with the monkey left him sounding more on edge than usual."I began carrying a big stick," Gray says. "I became like this old character in this place.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2013
    The 76ers have raided the Spurs' coaching pool, Grey's Anatomy is still on, and Wall Street moguls are doing their best to bully both Apple and BitCoin. Welcome to your trends report for Wednesday, August 14, 2013. Trending now What: Spurs Where: Twitter Why; The 76ers finally got their man. Brett Brown accepted the team's head coaching offer on Monday, according to several league sources. The former San Antonio Spurs assistant will receive a four-year, guaranteed contract.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2005
The courtroom drama Anatomy of a Murder opens tonight in the recently renovated Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park, marking the award-winning Bowie Community Theatre's 38th season. "The theater group wanted to do a mystery, and I prefer to do plays of substance over just a story line," said BCT director Estelle Miller. "I decided if we could find a cast of 16 men for this play that were characters to say something, I would direct it." Anatomy of a Murder was first a book, published in 1956 and written by Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker, under the pen name Robert Traver.
NEWS
By Jonathan D.Rockoff and Jonathan D.Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
Three days after a Kenwood High School junior left an anatomy class because she refused to dissect a cat, the Baltimore County school system let her return to the honors course yesterday and perform simulated dissections on a computer. "I'm relieved," Jennifer Watson, 16, of Essex said after learning the school system had purchased a CD-ROM so she can perform virtual dissections during her fifth-period class, rather than taking a standard-level class she didn't want. Watson said the turnabout will help many other classmates interested in learning physiology without cutting up dead animals.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2004
There's religious immortality and there's the more mundane kind Ronn Wade provides. He can give you shelf life after death. "This is a real human heart," says Wade as he reaches into a plastic bag and removes what looks like a pinkish-gray conch. "It's biostatically stable. You can hold it in your hands." With that, the heart gets passed around the room. Carefully. As if it's made of Waterford crystal. This is the kind of heart nobody wants to be responsible for breaking. Wade - longtime director of both the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's State Anatomy Board and the Anatomical Services Division of the University of Maryland Medical School, all of which means he secures and distributes research cadavers - has been invited to address a small group of nurses and administrative staff at St. Joseph Medical Center.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2003
Anne Wolkow, who is 96 years old, said she initially was leery of her husband's decision to donate his body to science, but she came to celebrate that act. Westminster resident Jacki Tkacik's parents made a similar choice, and her entire family has signed up to follow suit. Lauren Roth only knew the cadaver that she studied in anatomy class last fall as "Morty," but the 22-year-old medical student wondered what it would be like to meet his family. Wolkow, Tkacik and Roth were among a crowd of about 60 that gathered yesterday on a lawn at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville to honor Marylanders who had donated their bodies to medical education and research.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Talk about your still lifes. In most art schools, budding Rembrandts paint bowls of bananas or reclining nudes to learn their craft. Megan Bluhm's first assignment was a pelvic bone in charcoal. The only nudes she sketches are dead. "They hold real still," she says. "That's the nice part about it." Bluhm is a modern student of an ancient art: medical illustration. Even in this world of high-tech imaging, medicine still relies on old-fashioned illustrators to show what's going on inside the human body.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Add this to the reasons to take up jogging: It might be what separates us from the apes. Scientists at Harvard and the University of Utah say that much of our anatomy was shaped 2 million years ago when the earliest humans developed the bones, ligaments and joints necessary for long-distance running. That, in turn, gave humans a chance to hunt animals that were much faster in a sprint - but couldn't stay ahead in the long haul. Adaptations for running A close look at our skeletons - and the spring-like tendons in our legs and our relatively big buttocks (sorry, but it's true)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 26, 2013
Friday afternoon in a spacious Annapolis courtroom with a flat-screen monitor, Dr. Roy E. Bands Jr., board-certified orthopedic surgeon, presented a side view of John Leopold's lumbar region - how his lower spine, abdomen and bladder looked in January 2010. Too bad the doctor didn't have a scan of the Anne Arundel County executive's prefrontal cortex. And too bad technology does not exist to tell us what Leopold was thinking when he treated his staff - mostly the police officers assigned to protect him - like a bunch of stooges and lackeys.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Each week The Sun's  John McIntyre  presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: ANIMADVERSION Brace yourself if something you have written prompts animadversions. Animadversion (pronounced an-uh-mad-VER-zhun) is formal criticism or censure; animadversions are critical comments or remarks. To animadvert is to produce such criticism.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 9, 2011
There are serious news reports, and then there are serious news reports.  Thankfully, a recent performance of the KTLA Morning News team falls into the latter category. Tackling the important issue of the Shake Weight, the Los Angeles journalists were reduced to, well, what inevitably happens to everyone when discussing this latest fitness craze: Making anatomy jokes.  Some money quotes:  • "I've got a small, white one. Does that make a difference?"  • "I don't think it's the size of it. It's actually the technique.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Like a ghostly apparition from their past, Ben Roethlisberger will materialize in front of the Ravens on Saturday in Heinz Field and try to vanquish their Super Bowl aspirations for the second time in three seasons. The Pittsburgh Steelers' seven-year veteran has been equal parts quarterback, magician and tormentor to the Ravens while winning his last six starts against them, often in extraordinary fashion. There was the phantom touchdown throw to Santonio Holmes — who did not appear to break the plane of the goal line — that beat the Ravens, 13-9, at M&T Bank Stadium in December 2008 and won the AFC North title.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 6, 2010
Ravens coach John Harbaugh didn't second guess his decision to go for a first down rather than a potential game-tying field goal in the final minute of Sunday night's AFC North showdown against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Neither did kicker Billy Cundiff. With the wind in Cundiff's face, Harbaugh eschewed a 49- or 50-yard field goal and tried to convert fourth-and-2 from the Steelers' 31 with 37 seconds left. Quarterback Joe Flacco's pass landed at the feet of intended receiver Ed Dickson and the Steelers skittered out of M&T Bank Stadium with an improbable 13-10 victory.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2005
Bowie Community Theatre starts its 40th season with the suspenseful courtroom drama Anatomy of a Murder, which becomes highly charged interactive theater involving the audience in a search for truth. Director Estelle Miller has chosen to cast the entire audience as the jury that will decide the defendant's guilt or innocence. Based on a 1958 book by Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker under the pen name Robert Traver, it became a classic film in 1959, and Anatomy of a Murder was adapted for the stage in 1964.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
Standing on a ladder before a sea of first-year medical students with faces frozen between excitement and fear, Dr. Larry Anderson delivers his opening day speech. "This is your first patient," Anderson tells the 160 students who are huddled around gurneys draped in crisp, blue sheets that obscure the lumpy topography of the human form. "Remember, the people lying here were someone's mother, father, uncle, aunt and sister. And they decided to give you a gift." The 25-year teaching veteran, who heads the University of Maryland School of Medicine's anatomy department, calls them "patients" because they are to be treated with the same respect as the living.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
WMAR-TV, Baltimore's ABC affiliate, aired a rerun Thursday night of the medical drama "Grey's Anatomy" that contained graphic violence eerily similar to the real-life events that took place earlier in the day at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The episode, which was last year's season finale of the hospital series, involved a man who becomes angry after his wife dies in surgery and goes on a shooting spree in the hospital while hunting for the doctor who treated her. The last image before the first commercial is a doctor shot in the head by the gunman.
NEWS
August 18, 2009
William F. White He requested that his body be donated to the State Anatomy Board. A Memorial Mass is scheduled for August 20 at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.