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NEWS
March 26, 2010
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: If you want anarchy to rule the streets of Baltimore, then make your cuts to the police force ("Fire, police chiefs raise alarms for city's safety," March 26). If you want the years-long effort to eradicate the street-level drug thugs to fail, then make your cuts. If you don't want the relationships formed between the foot patrol cops and the residents of the various city neighborhoods, then go ahead and make your cuts. If you want your firefighters to attempt to do their jobs under even more duress, then make your cuts and close yet even more fire houses.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
The day after Joe Maddon's team was awarded a home run after a replay review showed that Matt Joyce's ball hit the base of Camden Yards' right-field foul pole in the Orioles' 3-1 loss to Tampa Bay, the Rays manager blasted crew chief Gerry Davis, calling the situation “baseball anarchy” and saying that Davis “made stuff up on the field.” Joyce's ball was originally ruled in play, landing him at second base with a double. But after Orioles manager Buck Showalter sprinted out of the dugout to argue the ball was foul, Maddon asked for a replay review, but wanted to ensure that the ball would either be ruled a home run or remain a double.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
The day after Joe Maddon's team was awarded a home run after a replay review showed that Matt Joyce's ball hit the base of Camden Yards' right-field foul pole in the Orioles' 3-1 loss to Tampa Bay, the Rays manager blasted crew chief Gerry Davis, calling the situation “baseball anarchy” and saying that Davis “made stuff up on the field.” Joyce's ball was originally ruled in play, landing him at second base with a double. But after Orioles manager Buck Showalter sprinted out of the dugout to argue the ball was foul, Maddon asked for a replay review, but wanted to ensure that the ball would either be ruled a home run or remain a double.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Col. Moammar Gadhafi's 42-year misrule of the oil-rich African nation of Libya appears finally to be nearing an end. The rebels' surprisingly swift advance into the capital, Tripoli, over the weekend brought large parts of the government's last remaining stronghold under their control, with only isolated pockets of resistance around Mr. Gadhafi's fortified compound. Barring any unforeseen reversal of fortunes, a total military collapse of the regime could occur imminently. These events have heartened the rebel groups that have been battling the dictator over the last six months of often inconclusive fighting, which likely would have ended quite differently without NATO airstrikes on Mr. Gadhafi's forces and Western military training and equipment.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | March 7, 1997
JAKARTA -- The wiser among Indonesia's rich and powerful avoid using the word ''succession,'' lest the president hear of it. The story goes that one of Suharto's favorites, a general named Benny Murdani, lost his position a few years ago when he asked the president what he thought of Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew stepping aside for younger men in Singapore.President Suharto, the second post-colonial leader of this vast archipelago country, is 75 years old. He took power in a military coup that removed the unstable founding father, President Sukarno.
NEWS
March 4, 1997
PRESIDENT SALI BERISHA of Albania, once heralded as the lone democrat of the Balkans, picked the wrong moment to have his parliament re-elect him to a second five-year term, just after giving him emergency powers. Albania has, in the southern coastal towns, dissolved into anarchy.The ostensible target of the rioters' wrath was a group of state-protected fraudulent pyramid investment schemes that collapsed, impoverishing most Albanians. But increasingly, their real target was the strong-man rule of President Berisha.
NEWS
December 25, 1996
GUATEMALA'S government and rebels plan to sign a final treaty Sunday to end 36 years of civil war that killed at least 100,000 and perhaps 140,000 people in that little, poor country. It will arrive none too soon.Support from the rest of the Americas comes in the form of an $84.8 million loan package. It was approved by the Inter-American Development Bank to rebuild infrastructure that was destroyed by war. Involved representatives of devastated communities will help choose the projects.Unfortunately, what was war has given way to crime and anarchy.
NEWS
July 24, 1997
CHARLES Taylor's little Libya-trained force started Liberia's civil war in 1990 to overthrow the dictator Samuel Doe, who was duly murdered by a rival warlord. Mr. Taylor is more responsible than any other individual for the anarchy, brutality, population displacements, societal breakdown and massive misery that descended on his country, which was founded by freed American slaves and modeled on U.S. institutions.Now an election has been held. Mr. Taylor appears to have won three-fourths of the vote for president in a field of 12. Admittedly, many demoralized and dislocated Liberians did not vote, but among those who did, Mr. Taylor is the overwhelming choice, perhaps because he threatened more war if he did not win. Jimmy Carter, the world's chief inspector of elections, said this one was better run than those he observed in Bosnia, Croatia and Haiti.
NEWS
April 1, 1997
ALTHOUGH several European institutions were available to serve as umbrella for an intervention force in Albania, their members chose the United Nations instead. The Security Council has authorized such a force, to consist entirely of Europeans and not the usual mix of peace-keepers.The problem in Albania is nothing like that in Bosnia, which pinned down 50,000 NATO troops. It more nearly resembles Somalia, with anarchy rather than civil war. The military mission is to protect humanitarian deliveries of food and medicine.
NEWS
June 2, 2003
IT'LL BE a long, hot summer for the men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division. Savoring their quick victory in Iraq, they were supposed to be coming home soon - but two unforeseen problems have put a wrench into those plans. The first problem has to do with the unfinished nature of the victory. For a while, Pentagon officials explained away the continued violence and anarchy in Iraq by saying they never expected the regime to collapse so swiftly. But it's a safer and safer bet to say they also never expected the last remnants of resistance to persevere for so long.
NEWS
March 26, 2010
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: If you want anarchy to rule the streets of Baltimore, then make your cuts to the police force ("Fire, police chiefs raise alarms for city's safety," March 26). If you want the years-long effort to eradicate the street-level drug thugs to fail, then make your cuts. If you don't want the relationships formed between the foot patrol cops and the residents of the various city neighborhoods, then go ahead and make your cuts. If you want your firefighters to attempt to do their jobs under even more duress, then make your cuts and close yet even more fire houses.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
The world has responded with tremendous generosity to the destruction in Haiti after last week's earthquake, but the breakdown of security and order there threatens to multiply the already terrible death toll if the food, water and medicine pouring into the country can't be distributed properly. Relief officials now estimate that the death toll could rise as high as 200,000, with hundreds of thousands more left seriously injured or homeless. With people desperate for food, water and shelter, looting has broken out in the country's shattered capital, Port-au-Prince, and thousands of residents are trying to flee the destruction for outlying areas, some of which are in even worse shape.
NEWS
By Daniel Morris | September 1, 2009
In my graduate class on Arab politics, we would often puzzle over decisions autocratic leaders have made that did not seem to make sense, either in moral or strategic terms. It was often tempting to take the intellectually lazy route and think they were simply crazy or stupid. In order to make the discussion more productive, the professor would suggest that we assume the leaders are at least as smart as ourselves. In recent weeks, the only person convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing was released to Libyan soil, where he received a jubilant welcome organized by Libyan leader Col. Muammar el Kadafi.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 19, 2007
JERUSALEM -- When the Palestinians unveiled their new unity government in March, they hailed it as an intellectual powerhouse. Educated at some of the top U.S. universities, the new ministers included physicians, engineers, university professors and authors. But the violence that has engulfed the Gaza Strip this week suggests that solving the riddle of the deep divisions between Hamas and Fatah is beyond even this government's capabilities. More than 50 Palestinians have been killed in some of the deadliest fighting between the two Palestinian factions, yet the power-sharing government, which was designed to end the bloodshed, has been helpless to restore calm.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
TO SAY THAT Haiti is on the brink of disaster would be a major understatement, 10 months after it became a rudderless nation. The island is riding a wave of catastrophe heading straight for calamity. Heavily armed gangs terrorize the streets of the teeming capital, Port-au-Prince, while opposing, equally fortified militias run the countryside. Interim leaders, who billed themselves as experienced technocrats who could hit the ground running, are still trying to figure out what political ground to stand on. Having dismissed the demands of supporters of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, they underestimated the resolve of those violently agitating for his return.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Tom Burton and Matthew Hay Brown and Tom Burton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 28, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - With a growing rebel uprising closing in and security forces nowhere in sight, Haiti's capital collapsed yesterday into a chaos of street executions, arson and looting. Masked gunmen patrolling the city in pickups fired into the air while looters raided dockside warehouses. Pistol-waving youths at downtown roadblocks robbed foreigners of money, cell phones and, in some cases, their cars. Bodies, some mutilated, lay in the streets. More than three weeks into an armed uprising that has quickly seized the northern half of the country, it appeared that an increasingly isolated President Jean-Bertrand Aristide finally had unleashed his chimeres - Creole for "monsters" - in a desperate last bid to remain in power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 1999
SEATTLE -- It took only a few minutes for the people in the monarch butterfly costumes and union jackets to realize that what was planned as the biggest American demonstration yet against global trade here yesterday had turned into a burst of window-breaking and looting in the late afternoon light.A surge of violence that ended in a civil emergency began when a knot of people clad in black broke away from the main demonstration and started overturning Dumpsters, stoking fires and smashing windows of stores and restaurants.
NEWS
By Daniel Morris | September 1, 2009
In my graduate class on Arab politics, we would often puzzle over decisions autocratic leaders have made that did not seem to make sense, either in moral or strategic terms. It was often tempting to take the intellectually lazy route and think they were simply crazy or stupid. In order to make the discussion more productive, the professor would suggest that we assume the leaders are at least as smart as ourselves. In recent weeks, the only person convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing was released to Libyan soil, where he received a jubilant welcome organized by Libyan leader Col. Muammar el Kadafi.
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