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By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The rising costs of Medicaid and other state-funded assistance programs have outpaced a promising uptick in revenue, state fiscal analysts reported Wednesday. The development means Maryland lawmakers will face a $1.6 billion budget deficit when they return to Annapolis in January. Just weeks ago, officials were hopeful that better-than-expected receipts from taxes and fees would boost the state's budget outlook. But such "dollops of good news," state analyst Warren G. Deschenaux said, "didn't really mitigate the dimension of the problem.
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SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 3, 2014
ESPN NFL draft analyst Todd McShay will be part of the crew calling Maryland's game against Ohio Saturday on ABC. To get a better feel for both teams, McShay spent part of this week watching film of the Terps' and Buckeyes' previous games. One of the players McShay apparently liked was Maryland fullback and Gilman alum Kenny Goins. "Maryland FB Kenneth Goins making quick rise to top of my favorite players on tape list,” McShay tweeted Thursday . “No. 30 is gonna find contact when he's on the field!
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
The thought crossed Shane Cockerille 's mind just about every Saturday in November. If the Gilman quarterback was just one year older, it would be him instead of linebacker Shawn Petty under center for Maryland. Cockerille was far from the only one who pictured himself taking snaps for the Terps after they lost C.J. Brown, Perry Hills, Devin Burns and Caleb Rowe to season-ending injuries. “Shane Cockerille isn't the tallest quarterback, but he's a gamer that comes from a great high school program,” said 247Sports.com analyst J.C. Shurburtt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
With Greg Gumbel and Trent Green as the CBS broadcast team on today's Ravens game, I was eager to see how Gumbel would fare without his old, gaffe-prone partner Dan Dierdorf. I figured Gumbel had to be better, right? Wrong. “Welcome back to an absolutely beautiful day in Baltimore, Maryland,” Gumbel said in his opening remarks as viewers saw an overhead shot of M&T Bank Stadium. “The sun is shining, the temperature is 78 degrees on this last day of September ...” Oops.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Hechinger Co. has been silent since it announced three weeks ago today that it is negotiating the sale of the company for $3 a share, but analysts expect the company can't remain mum much longer.Failure to say something soon, they said, will hurt Hechinger even more by lowering employee morale and making customers hesitant and vendors anxious."How long do you string people on?" said Don Longo, editor of the National Home Center News, an industry trade publication. Store managers and employees can't feel very good about their jobs, he said.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Last Wednesday, at the company's Investor Day , Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank ended his opening statement by urging those in attendance to clap if they felt so compelled. There were, indeed, moments that inspired people in the crowd to bring their hands together. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady showed up. An adorable video featuring young athletes was shown. Jeremy Piven appeared in a rousing speech about what Baltimore means. Models walked the stage wearing new products. At other times, though, Under Armour officials were left to provide their own celebratory punctuation, saying, “Wasn't that cool?
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Real estate investment trusts (REITs) fended off many analysts' predictions of a slowdown in 1994 by raising $13.3 billion, according to statistics compiled by the industry's trade group.The activity made it the industry's second-best year in its 32-year history. It followed a record $18.3 billion generated last year, when 40 initial public offerings were made.It "has been a great year, despite some of the grousing about REITs which has occurred over the past six months," said Mark O. Decker, president of the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, the Washington-based trade organization.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Although the Bush administration claims that budget savings from a sweeping package of unilateral nuclear arms cuts will be "significant" over the long run, outside analysts say actual savings will probably be much smaller than advertised.This will be especially true if Congress allows the military to redirect funds earmarked for the nuclear weapons canceled by President Bush last Friday to other strategic projects, among them the B-2 stealth bomber, several analysts said.Partial figures already released by the Pentagon, which show a potential long-term savings of about $20 billion, reflect a false assumption that the military would have bought all the mobile missiles and other weapons it wanted, said Steven Kosiak, senior analyst of the Defense Budget Project, a non-partisan research group.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 19, 2012
The loss of inside linebacker Ray Lewis to a torn right triceps suffered in the fourth quarter of Sunday's 31-29 win against the Dallas Cowboys saps the Ravens of their leading tackler and emotional sparkplug. But according to a pair of NFL Network analysts, the defense should fare fine even without the 13-time Pro Bowler. Speaking on “Thursday Night Kickoff,” former St. Louis Rams running back Marshall Faulk pointed out that the unit hasn't been exactly suffocating through the first six games of the season and that was with Lewis in the starting lineup.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
T. Rowe Price Group Inc., a Baltimore-based mutual fund and investment advisory services company, reported sharp increases in average mutual fund assets under management and investment advisory revenue, but the company's profits fell short of analysts' expectations in the first quarter. Price said it posted diluted earnings of 72 cents per share — a 26 percent increase over the quarter a year ago. Analysts polled by MarketWatch had expected diluted earnings per share of 75 cents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
When the first video of Ray Rice dragging his then-fiancee off a casino elevator like a slab of meat appeared, I thought, "God bless TMZ. " With TMZ's release of video today showing him punching Janay Palmer twice and knocking her to the floor, I say, God bless TMZ again and again. You can read what I wrote in February here under the headline: "Ray Rice and how TMZ counters the great American hype machine. " TMZ did the job the mainstream sports media failed to do in showing us the ugliness of this incident.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Back-to-school promotions showed up in many area stores in mid-July. But now that the kids are back in classrooms -- or headed there soon -- the real shopping will begin, one analyst believes. Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst for The NPD Group, says this year's shoppers are waiting for school to start. He noted that retail sales in July didn't get the expected bump to help kick off the third quarter. Here's his take: "Parents are prioritizing by purchasing supplies first, then some basic wardrobe necessities and lastly following up with fashion, putting summer aside and purchasing clothing and apparel for colder rather than warmer weather," he said today in an NPD blog post.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
J. Paul Gahagan, a retired Social Security Administration disability analyst and an accomplished woodworker, died Sunday at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville of complications from an infection. He was 87. James Paul Gahagan - he never used his first name, family members said - was born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore. "He grew up on Aiken Street and had many childhood adventures, including walking over the beams of the Howard Street bridge," said a daughter, Kathy Briggs of Stoneleigh.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Former Ravens safety Ed Reed had his moments with the media during his superlative career here, some good, some bad. But now, he's joining their ranks. Sports Business Daily's John Ourand reported Thursday afternoon that Reed would be joining Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall on the “Inside the NFL” show, which will air Tuesday nights on Showtime and re-air Wednesday on NFL Network. Reed told reporters at Lardarius Webb's charity softball game in June that he was “definitely preparing to play,” though he didn't have plans to sign at all. "I'm very excited to be part of the Inside the NFL team this season," Reed said in a statement.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 11, 2014
When the regular season opens next month, former Ravens linebacker Bart Scott will debut on CBS's NFL Today pregame show as a commentator and analyst. Can't wait. Scott will be provocative, funny, entertaining and knowledgeable, but there also will be times when what he says might appear irrational or as if he's "on medication. " Can't wait. Scott, affectionately known as "The Mad Backer" in Baltimore, will always give you an honest, sometimes emotional opinion, none better than his "can't wait" rant on ESPN in 2011 after his New York Jets upset the New England Patriots.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Matthew T. Kellermann, a computer systems analyst and lifelong baseball fan, died Aug. 1 of a heart attack at his Ellicott City home. He was 53. The son of John L. "Jack" Kellermann, an American Telephone & Telegraph worker, and Ruth Bopp Kellermann, Matthew Thomas Kellermann was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in the West Hills neighborhood before moving in 1972 with his family to the Allenford neighborhood of Ellicott City. A 1979 graduate of Mount Hebron High School, where he was an outstanding varsity pitcher, he studied for two years at the Community College of Baltimore County's Catonsville campus.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 31, 2012
One of this weekend's AFC playoff games pits the Ravens against the Indianapolis Colts. There are many storylines linked to Sunday's contest including the history between Baltimore and Indianapolis, the inspiring story of Colts coach and former Ravens defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano, and the impending return of former Ravens like defensive end Cory Redding, free safety Tom Zbikowski and offensive lineman Joe Reitz. There's also the matter of the two quarterbacks, the Ravens' Joe Flacco and the Colts' Andrew Luck.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
To hear Louis Lowenstein tell it, securities analysts are shortsighted to the point of being myopic, always focusing on today's profits, encouraging rapid trading and too often failing to stick by their guns when they know an investment makes sense for the long term.It may have been a case of biting the hand that feeds you, but the roomful of Baltimore security analysts that paid for Mr. Lowenstein's trip to Baltimore was nonetheless receptive to his criticisms at the Stouffer Harborplace Renaissance Hotel yesterday.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | July 30, 2014
CBSSports.com NFL draft analyst Dane Brugler spent part of last week watching Maryland game tape from last season. He wanted to get a more extensive look at Stefon Diggs, the Terps' dynamic junior wide receiver and kick returner who many pundits feel could be an early-round pick in next year's draft. But Brugler said the Terps do have other players besides Diggs who are already on the radar of analysts and NFL teams for the 2015 NFL draft. In particular, Brugler focused on 6-foot-3, 320-pound nose tackle Darius Kilgo.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Draft fatigue? What draft fatigue? After months of preparation, the draft analysts have shifted their focus from projecting who teams would draft (with limited success) to grading the players the teams actually did select. These are typically exercises in reputation worship and common sense work: if you have a history of drafting well, you probably drafted well again this year. And if you had a ton of picks, you probably picked a lot of players who could be good, because you picked a lot of players.
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