Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnalog Signals
IN THE NEWS

Analog Signals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | December 23, 2007
The Romeros' long relationship with their television ended on a gray, drizzly morning at the Cockeysville recycling center. Dina Romero carried the small TV into a metal shipping container and placed it in a pile of other TVs destined for end-of-life dismantling in New Jersey. "My husband bought a plasma TV, so we don't need this one anymore," the Cockeysville resident said. The 13-inch set had served the family well for 22 years, but its time had come - just as it will for millions of analog TVs as the United States moves into a new digital era. With U.S. broadcasters slated to switch to all-digital transmissions on Feb. 17, 2009 - and millions of viewers already replacing their older sets with high-definition TVs - American consumers are creating what some critics see as an environmental disaster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2009
The Federal Communications Commission has been planning a move to higher-quality digital television for a very long time, so it's hard to understand why 6 million Americans will be without some of their favorite television shows this week when some television stations here and across the nation switch off their analog signals. At fault are shortsighted federal bureaucrats who tried to accomplish the conversion on the cheap and made miscalculations that even the bumbling manager of The Office would have avoided.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 15, 2009
The Federal Communications Commission has been planning a move to higher-quality digital television for a very long time, so it's hard to understand why 6 million Americans will be without some of their favorite television shows this week when some television stations here and across the nation switch off their analog signals. At fault are shortsighted federal bureaucrats who tried to accomplish the conversion on the cheap and made miscalculations that even the bumbling manager of The Office would have avoided.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Television officially enters the 21st century Feb. 17, when the much-heralded "digital transition" takes place. On that day, broadcast stations - those one can view without subscribing to cable or satellite systems - will stop transmitting old-fashioned analog signals and start sending out their programming digitally. What does that mean? A better, clearer picture, experts say, and more stations. That's the good news. The bad news is, unless you've prepared yourself and your home's TVs properly, come Feb. 17, you may not be watching any TV at all. If your sets are attached to a cable or satellite system, however, you should be fine, regardless of the age of the TV. Why are we doing this?
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
With the switch to all-digital television exactly a year away, vouchers to defray the cost of converter boxes necessary to keep older sets working will begin hitting the mail this week - and officials are urging people to request them early, as they are going fast. The federal government is offering each family up to two $40 vouchers to purchase the boxes, which will translate digital broadcast signals so they can be viewed on analog TVs. But the number of requests for the vouchers has been higher than predicted, raising concerns that the $1.5 billion set aside by the government might not be enough to meet consumer demand.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | May 1, 2008
My parents have a 20-year-old TV. They want to buy a new TV for the change to digital rather than buying a digital converter box for over-the-air reception. They do not have cable, and they are not going to get cable. Can they buy an LCD, plasma or DLP TV and use an indoor antenna to get reception? They will not put up an outdoor antenna. - James Young I use an indoor antenna with my HDTV (I also have cable, but I am able to use the indoor antenna as well) and get a good signal. It's all a question of how strong the signal is from their location.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
This fall the biggest broadcast event since the introduction of color TV will occur. But almost no one will see it.It's the rollout of high-definition television, or HDTV, a digitally transmitted signal hailed as the sharpest, most lifelike TV picture ever seen. If you have the right equipment, HDTV will also deliver compact-disk-quality sound. And because digital transmissions are so efficient, HDTV can carry Internet and other data traffic as well.The problem is that no one has an HDTV set. The question facing the government, broadcasters and manufacturers is whether consumers will part with thousands of dollars for a clearer picture of ballgames, sitcoms and old movies.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Television officially enters the 21st century Feb. 17, when the much-heralded "digital transition" takes place. On that day, broadcast stations - those one can view without subscribing to cable or satellite systems - will stop transmitting old-fashioned analog signals and start sending out their programming digitally. What does that mean? A better, clearer picture, experts say, and more stations. That's the good news. The bad news is, unless you've prepared yourself and your home's TVs properly, come Feb. 17, you may not be watching any TV at all. If your sets are attached to a cable or satellite system, however, you should be fine, regardless of the age of the TV. Why are we doing this?
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | March 15, 2007
If you have TV sets that pull in stations through antennas, listen up. The federal government will give you two vouchers worth $40 apiece to buy converters to keep those sets from going dark when broadcasters switch from analog to digital signals in less than two years. We don't know when the vouchers will be available, but when they are, sign up right away -- because there may not be enough to go around. If the government is going to take away the TV broadcasts you've been perfectly happy with, it might as well pay part of the cost to keep your set alive.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems, the cellular arm of Bell Atlantic Corp., said yesterday that it has placed orders for 40,000 cellular phones that can handle both analog and digital signals, making it one of the first cellular operators in the country to move ahead with dual-use phones.The new phones are in use experimentally in a few markets but are not commercially available.The phones are designed to switch easily between traditional analog signals and digital signals, which use a newer technology to transmit communications.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | May 1, 2008
My parents have a 20-year-old TV. They want to buy a new TV for the change to digital rather than buying a digital converter box for over-the-air reception. They do not have cable, and they are not going to get cable. Can they buy an LCD, plasma or DLP TV and use an indoor antenna to get reception? They will not put up an outdoor antenna. - James Young I use an indoor antenna with my HDTV (I also have cable, but I am able to use the indoor antenna as well) and get a good signal. It's all a question of how strong the signal is from their location.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
With the switch to all-digital television exactly a year away, vouchers to defray the cost of converter boxes necessary to keep older sets working will begin hitting the mail this week - and officials are urging people to request them early, as they are going fast. The federal government is offering each family up to two $40 vouchers to purchase the boxes, which will translate digital broadcast signals so they can be viewed on analog TVs. But the number of requests for the vouchers has been higher than predicted, raising concerns that the $1.5 billion set aside by the government might not be enough to meet consumer demand.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | December 23, 2007
The Romeros' long relationship with their television ended on a gray, drizzly morning at the Cockeysville recycling center. Dina Romero carried the small TV into a metal shipping container and placed it in a pile of other TVs destined for end-of-life dismantling in New Jersey. "My husband bought a plasma TV, so we don't need this one anymore," the Cockeysville resident said. The 13-inch set had served the family well for 22 years, but its time had come - just as it will for millions of analog TVs as the United States moves into a new digital era. With U.S. broadcasters slated to switch to all-digital transmissions on Feb. 17, 2009 - and millions of viewers already replacing their older sets with high-definition TVs - American consumers are creating what some critics see as an environmental disaster.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | March 15, 2007
If you have TV sets that pull in stations through antennas, listen up. The federal government will give you two vouchers worth $40 apiece to buy converters to keep those sets from going dark when broadcasters switch from analog to digital signals in less than two years. We don't know when the vouchers will be available, but when they are, sign up right away -- because there may not be enough to go around. If the government is going to take away the TV broadcasts you've been perfectly happy with, it might as well pay part of the cost to keep your set alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
This fall the biggest broadcast event since the introduction of color TV will occur. But almost no one will see it.It's the rollout of high-definition television, or HDTV, a digitally transmitted signal hailed as the sharpest, most lifelike TV picture ever seen. If you have the right equipment, HDTV will also deliver compact-disk-quality sound. And because digital transmissions are so efficient, HDTV can carry Internet and other data traffic as well.The problem is that no one has an HDTV set. The question facing the government, broadcasters and manufacturers is whether consumers will part with thousands of dollars for a clearer picture of ballgames, sitcoms and old movies.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
With a ceremonial first call from Vice President Al Gore in Washington to Mayor Kurt Schmoke in Baltimore yesterday, the nation's first personal communications services network launched its digital challenge to the cellular telephone industry.American Personal Communications Inc., a Bethesda-based company founded by cellular pioneer Wayne N. Schelle, inaugurated the wireless PCS network at simultaneous press conferences in both cities.The Baltimore-Washington system, which will market its services under the brand name Sprint Spectrum, is the first of what is expected to be a nationwide network of wireless PCS providers.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | May 29, 2008
I have received two coupons for TV converter boxes. Included with the coupons was a list of about 34 manufacturers. My question: Are all converter boxes basically equal? If not, is there a source where one could get ratings? Also, several models were identified as being able to pass through an analog signal. Is this an advantage? - Bob Tawes I have not reviewed the various converter boxes. But I found a Web page from Consumer Reports that offered general advice. You might want to check that out: http://tinyurl.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.